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Grand Theft Auto V Introduction:

Grand Theft Auto V is an action-adventure open-world video game developed by Rockstar North and published by Rockstar Games. It was released on September 2013 for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3, in November 2014 for Xbox One and PlayStation 4, and in April 2015 for Microsoft Windows. It’s the first main entry in the Grand Theft Auto series since Grand Theft Auto IV. Set within the unbelievable state of San Andreas, based on Southern California, the single-player story includes three criminals and their efforts to commit theft while under pressure from a government agency. The open-world design allows players freely roam San Andreas’ open countryside and the fictional city of Los Santos, based in Los Angeles.

The game can be played in different perspectives from either a first-person or third-person perspective, and its world is navigated by vehicle or on foot. Players control the three lead characters throughout single-player mode and switch between them both during and outside missions. The story is centered on the crime sequences, and many missions involve driving and shooting gameplay. A “wanted” system legislates the aggression of law enforcement response to players who commit the crime. Grand Theft Auto V Online, the online multiplayer mode, allows up to 30 players to engage in a variety of different cooperative and competitive game modes.

Gameplay Of GTA V:

Grand Theft Auto V is an open-world game played from either a third-person or first-person perspective. Players complete missions linear schemes with set objectives to progress through the story. Outside of the missions, players can freely roam the open-world. Composed of the San Andreas’s open countryside area, comprising the fictional city of Los Santos. And the fictional Blaine County, the world is much larger in area than the earlier release in the series. It can be fully explored after the game’s beginning without restriction, although story progress unlocks more gameplay content.

Players can take cover behind objects during the firefights to avoid taking damage from enemies.

Players use firearms, melee attacks, and explosives to fight enemies, and may run, swim, jump or use vehicles to roam the world. To accommodate the map size, the game introduces vehicle types absent in its previous release Grand Theft Auto IV, like fixed-wing aircraft. In combat, a cover and auto-aim system may be used as assistance against enemies. If players take damage, their health meter will be regenerate to its halfway point. Players respawn at hospitals when their health diminishes. If players commit crimes, law enforcement agencies can respond as indicated by a “wanted” meter in the HUD (head-up display). Stars displayed on the meter show the current wanted level (for example, at the maximum five-star level, police helicopters and SWAT teams swarm to dispatch players lethally). The Police officers will search for players who leave the wanted proximity. The meter enters a cool-down state and eventually recedes when players are hidden from the Law Inforcement officers’ line of sight that displays on the mini-map.

The single-player mode allows players to control three characters: Michael De Santa, Trevor Philips, and Franklin Clinton criminals whose stories interconnect as they complete missions. Some missions are completed with an only single character, and others feature two or three. Outside the missions, players can switch between characters if they want by a directional compass on the HUD. The game can switch characters automatically during missions to complete particular objectives. A character’s compass avatar may flash red if he is in danger and needs any help, and flash white if he has strategic advantages. Although players complete missions as any of the three characters, the more difficult crime missions require aid from AI-controlled accomplices with unique skill sets such as driving and computer hacking. If an accomplice survives a successful theft, they take a cut from the cash reward and can be available for following tasks with improvements to their unique skills. Some crimes afford multiple strategies; in a holdup mission. Players can either conspicuously storm the venue with guns drawn or stealthily subdue civilians with an incapacitating agent.

Each character has a skill set of eight skills that represent their ability in particular areas such as driving and shooting. Though skills improve through play, each of the characters has a skill with expertise by default (For Example, Trevor’s flying skill). The eighth “special” skill implies the effectiveness in performing an ability that’s unique to each respective character. Franklin slows down the time while driving, Michael enters bullet time in combat, and Trevor deals twice as much damage to enemies while taking half as much in fights. A meter on each character’s HUD drains when an ability is being used and regenerates when players perform skillful actions.

While free-roaming the game world, players can engage in context-specific tasks such as scuba diving and BASE jumping. Each character has its smartphone for contacting friends, starting tasks, and accessing an in-game Internet. The Internet allows players to trade in stocks via a stock market. Players can purchase properties such as businesses and garages, upgrade the vehicles and weapons in each character’s arsenal. Also, Players may visit places such as cinemas and strip clubs. Players can also customize their appearance by purchasing outfits, haircuts, and tattoos.

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The 100 Greatest Car Songs of All Time: Staff List

Whether or not you’ll be first in line for the new Fast & Furious movie this weekend, the movie’s release confirms what we’ve long suspected: It’s officially car season. Popular music has been occupied with all things automotive for ages, but particularly since the COVID pandemic started, cars have been everywhere in songs, videos and performances — unsurprising, given our crescendoing desire to hit the road to just go somewhere, anywhere this past year-plus. And now, with the world reopening, there is absolutely no time like the present to (responsibly) pile into the nearest ride and (safely) hit the highway for some quality road tripping.

In honor of this moment — as well as Billboard‘s recent digital cover story on the musical impact of the Fast & Furious franchise — we’ve compiled a list of our staff’s 100 favorite driving songs, spanning each of the past 10 decades of auto tunes. Most are of course road-focused, but not all; we wanted to pay tribute to the car’s place in music history as not just a transportation tool but a status symbol, a metaphor for excitement and escape, and a place for whatever backseat business needs to be accomplished. Truck songs were also considered, though not bus or motorcycle, and while not all songs are explicitly (or entirely) four-wheel-focused, all need at least some specific lyrical mention of cars or driving and riding to be counted.

Check out our list below, with a Spotify playlist of all 100 songs at the bottom, and try not to run through too many red lights and stop signs when blasting them out of your Bugatti, GTO or Little Red Corvette this weekend.

100. THE CARS, “DRIVE” 

Make and Model: The only Billboard Hot 100 entry for new wave greats The Cars with an automotive title to match their band name, “Drive” was also their biggest hit on the chart, motoring all the way to No. 3 in the fall of 1984.

Fuel Economy: Truth told, “Drive” is pretty tangentially car-themed for a song with its title — the lyric is mostly focused on a man asking rhetorical questions to demonstrate his value in a relationship, which is the only reason the stunning synth-rock ballad isn’t higher on this list — but the central chorus Q (and the artist/song name combo) makes its appearance here essential nonetheless.

Overdrive: “Who’s gonna drive you home tonight?” All the history, intimacy, trust and distance of a relationship in one six-word question from motorist to passenger. — ANDREW UNTERBERGER

99. JONI MITCHELL, “CAR ON A HILL”

Make and Model: Mitchell turns waiting for her absent lover to arrive into a sonic masterpiece that sounds as innovative, ambitious and magical today as it did when it came out nearly 50 years ago on 1974’s Court and Spark.

Fuel Economy:  Mitchell perfectly captures her fears that her once red-hot romance has turned tepid as her man is three hours late — and counting — but it’s the shifting tempos, bleating horns and choral interlude,all surrounding a funky beat, that keep the listener captivated.

Overdrive: Rumors are that Mitchell wrote the song about Jackson Browne or Glenn Frey, but we owe whoever kept her waiting a debt of thanks for inspiring such lines as “Fast tires come screaming around the bend/ But there’s still no buzzer/ They roll on/ And I’m waiting for his car on the hill.” — MELINDA NEWMAN

98. LLOYD BANKS FEAT. JUELZ SANTANA, “BEAMER, BENZ OR BENTLEY”

Make and Model: A hip-hop classic from 2010, “Beamer, Benz or Bentley” finds Lloyd Banks and Juelz Santana lyrically flexing about all the perks of being fresh, fly and so damn high.

Fuel Economy: With rhymes and bars that flow as fast as a 500-horsepower engine, Banks and Santana’s raps perfectly ride the track’s electric beat.

Overdrive: Banks became the early pace car for limber rhymes in 2010s hip-hop with the lyric, “I’m so fly, I’m so ferry and the way I flow is very/ Ginsu or machete, way my pencil move is deadly.” — DARLENE ADEROJU

97. LEE ANN WOMACK, “A LITTLE PAST LITTLE ROCK”

Make and Model: In her first Hot 100 hit, country star Lee Ann Womack speeds away from Dallas heading due north in the hopes of putting physical and emotional distance between her and heartbreak — though she finds the former unsurprisingly easier than the latter.

Fuel Economy: The chest-tightening ballad does a brilliant job of demonstrating the liberation that hitting the road can represent for those desperately in need of a second chance at life or love — though only up to a point.

Overdrive: If you’re listening to this one in the car, maybe best to pull over when Womack’s voice frays just a little on the “I’ve got to keep my heart out of this/ And both hands on the wheel” part of the chorus; driving through tears isn’t particularly safe for anyone. — A.U.

96. RICK ROSS FEAT. CHRISETTE MICHELE AND DRAKE, “ASTON MARTON MUSIC”

Make and Model: Though released in 2010, the J.U.S.T.I.C.E. League-produced beat to this luxurious cruising anthem strikes an old-school feel, with Rick Ross and Drake trading turns rapping and crooning, respectively — while Chrisette Michele anchors the track with a breezy, carefree hook. 

Fuel Economy: Aside from the sheer star power — at the time of the song’s release, all three artists had scored a Billboard 200 No. 1 entry in the prior year-plus — the track oozes top-down, stereo-up vibes, though Drake’s backseat driving is there to remind you that you’re always just a few blocks away from your ex’s place. 

Overdrive: Hard to go against the chorus in this instance, but if you listen closely at the end of Rozay’s first verse, he raps “In my two-seater she’s the one that I would take,” before throwing in a jubilant wee! that’s too good to pass up. — JOSH GLICKSMAN

95. DAVID LINDLEY, “MERCURY BLUES”

Make and Model:  Originally co-written and recorded as a jaunty blues by K.C. Douglas in 1948, and subsequently covered by such artists as Steve Miller and Alan Jackson, Lindley’s 1981 version cuts the brake line and lead-foots it from the opening count to the cacophonous guitar-and-drum pile-up at the end. (Cue ‘70s TV detective show clip of a car plunging over a cliff and bursting into flames.)

Fuel Economy: Lindley’s guitar virtuosity, which helped define the California rock sound of the mid-‘70s and early ‘80s, and his high-register vocals — that’s his falsetto on Jackson Browne’s live version of Maurice Williams’ ’“Stay” — make his “Mercury Blues” a giddy joy ride down an empty four-lane.

Fourth Gear: “I’m crazy ‘bout a Mercury” figures in all but one verse — and, between the lines, Lindley brings that fervor to life with some crazy-good guitar runs that channel Chuck Berry through his sui generis six-string sound.  –FRANK DIGIACOMO

94. OBZESIÓN, “MI TROKITA”

Make and Model: One of the first norteño songs to go viral on TikTok, Obzesión’s “Mi Trokita” stood out thanks to its cheeky and catchy lyrics, inspired by Texas’ truck scene, and an irresistible uptempo cambia beat that gave life to yet another dance challenge on the social media platform. Released in late 2020, the track peaked at No. 19 on Billboard’s Hot Latin Songs chart this March.

Fuel Economy: The song’s simple yet effective lyrics speak to that special bond with an old but mighty truck that can still get you from point A to B. Even better, the flashy and customized trokita is still turning heads as you cruise around the neighborhood.

Fourth Gear: The love for the truck scene in Texas at the song’s core is perfectly captured in the song’s hook — “Y run, run, run, No se raja mi trokita, Tirando aceite pasando la garita” — which essentially translates to “vroom vroom vroom, my little truck doesn’t give up/ Leaking oil passing by la garita” (a famous parking lot where truck aficionados meet up).— GRISELDA FLORES

93. HARRY CHAPIN, “TAXI”

Make and Model: The big single off Chapin’s 1972 debut, Heads and Tales, made the album a hit and Chapin a folk star. A bittersweet, meandering tale of two mismatched people confronting the disappointments of life (“She was gonna be an actress/I was gonna learn to fly”), the six-minute-plus track — with dramatic cello and bass-player-singing-falsetto interludes — is anchored by Chapin’s expressive voice and natural raconteur skills.

Fuel Economy: Well, it’s a song about a taxi driver, that takes place in a taxi. But Chapin also manages to make the listener feel like they’re actually in the taxi with him, taking the long route home, watching driver Harry and mysterious passenger Sue catch up while simultaneously hearing their inner monologues.

Overdrive: There may always be a point in a Chapin song when you wonder “are we there yet?” — but stick it out for all six minutes and you’ll be rewarded with the sardonic wink of a final lyric summing up how Harry’s disappointment is at least a little more fun than Sue’s: “And here she’s acting happy inside her handsome home/ And me, I’m flying in my taxi/ Taking tips, and getting stoned.” — REBECCA MILZOFF

92. THURSDAY, “UNDERSTANDING IN A CAR CRASH”

Make and Model: The closest thing to a breakout hit ever enjoyed by New Jersey emo royals Thursday, 2001’s “Understanding in a Car Crash” is the exhilarating, terrifying sonic approximation of bracing for inevitable on-road impact.

Fuel Economy: Amidst so many scattered thoughts and so much shattered glass, the song’s jagged guitars and yelped lyrics hit with particular force because they remember to be as much about the understanding as the car crash, singer Geoff Rickly reaching the eye of the storm and queasily concluding, “I don’t want to feel this way forever.”

Overdrive: Not that the song really needed to spell out its title, but there’s still something incredibly satisfying and cathartic about the backing vocals rising at song’s climax to shout it out loud: “UNDERSTANDING! IN A CAR CRASH!” — A.U.

91. ELLIOTT MURPHY, “DRIVE ALL NIGHT”

Make and Model: A rapid-fire cascade of drums (credited to Phil Collins), a joyous Farfisa-style organ and a pledge of “true highway affection” crack open this overlooked gem from rocker Elliott Murphy’s 1977 album Just A Story From America, the fourth release from the singer/songwriter who deserved the complimentary comparisons to his pal Bruce Springsteen.

Fuel Economy: The song’s racing pace never lets up, as Murphy’s backing vocals and lyrics evoke the great pop car classics of Jan & Dean and the Beach Boys.

Overdrive: “Now wait a minute!” shouts Murphy as the instruments drop back for a bridge, and the singer tells of a hot-wired escapade: “If your Daddy knew he’d kill/ `cause we just stole the keys to his brand new Coupe de Ville.” — THOM DUFFY

90. LUCINDA WILLIAMS, “CAR WHEELS ON A GRAVEL ROAD”

Make and Model: The 1998 title track from Williams’s fifth album takes listeners for a drive where Hank Williams plays on the radio, adults whisper in the front seats, and cotton fields stretch as far as the eye can see.

Fuel Economy: While the guitars and drums steadily chug and the chorus simply repeats the song’s title, the bright sound of the mando-guitar — half mandolin, half guitar — and the scenery Williams describes bust up the monotony of the ride.

Overdrive: Williams revealing that there’s a child in the backseat, unsure of the intention of the drive, adds an emotional depth to the upbeat track: “Child in the backseat about 4 or 5 years/ Lookin’ out the window/ Little bit of dirt mixed with tears/ Car wheels on a gravel road.” — CHRISTINE WERTHMAN

89. THE OFFSPRING, “BAD HABIT”

Make and Model: A violent, frenetic revenge fantasy, this deep cut off The Offspring’s 1994 pop-punk blockbuster Smash was the foul-mouthed favorite of every teenager still years several away from being eligible to experience the road rage described within.

Fuel Economy: “Bad Habit” certainly drives it like it talks it, switching from its foreboding, drumless intro into its breakneck-speed verses with enough whiplashing force to live up to its early threats: “When I’m in my car, don’t gimme no crap/ ‘Coz the slightest thing and I just might snap!

Overdrive: The escalatingly profane scream-along bridge no doubt remains an absolute scourge to surviving ’90s parents nationwide: “You stupid, dumb s–t, GODD–N MOTHERF–KER!!!!” — A.U.

88. RUSH, “RED BARCHETTA”

Make and Model: This six-minute epic, inspired by a 1973 short story in Road & Track and recorded for Rush’s 1981 Moving Pictures album, sketches an entire story set in a dystopian, speedphobic future, in which the singer takes a train to his uncle’s country house to joyride illegally in “A brilliant red Barchetta/ From a better, vanished time.” The Barchetta — which means “small boat” in Italian, but here refers to a high-performance, open-top car — may not be economical, but the song’s lyrics are.

Fuel Economy: This isn’t about going for a ride, it’s about driving: adrenaline, “hot metal and oil,” and then – suddenly – a car chase.

Overdrive: The song speeds up as the Barchetta does – and both seem perilously close to spinning out of control. Then, in one final twist, the narrator ditches his pursuers, and calls it a day (“Race back to the farm/ To dream with my uncle at the fireside”). — ROB LEVINE

87. THREE 6 MAFIA FEAT. LIL FLIP, “RIDIN’ SPINNERS”

Make and Model: Coming off the dirty south assembly line in 2003 — one year after Lil’ Flip’s breakout “The Way We Ball” and three years before Three 6 Mafia became Oscar winners — “Ridin’ Spinners” is an earnest ode to spinner rims everywhere, from “the club parking lot [to] the expressway.”

Fuel Economy: Writing teachers often tell you to get as specific as possible to paint the most vivid picture, which is exactly what the Memphis mafia do on this slow-rolling banger that touches on the flex and the freedom of speeding along in a top-tier ride.

Overdrive: Either DJ Paul boasting “My rims so shiny they clear like flat-screen plasma” or Flip declaring, “We like our music slow, but our cars go faster.” — JOE LYNCH

86. QUEEN, “I’M IN LOVE WITH MY CAR”

Make and Model: Many rock songs in history have used cars as romantic stand-ins, but few have ever been as explicit about a very literal love between man and machine as this deep cut from Queen’s 1975 classic A Night at the Opera, written and sung by drummer Roger Taylor.

Fuel Economy: Though the song would eventually serve as a punchline in the band’s Bohemian Rhapsody biopic, it remains one of their most enjoyably revved-up productions, with winkingly over-the-top lyrics that could probably have been recycled by Spinal Tap a decade later.

Overdrive: Few questionable rhymes ever forced into a love song have landed as deliciously as “Told my girl I’ll have to forget her/ Rather buy me a new carburetor!” — A.U.

85. CAKE, “THE DISTANCE”

Make and Model: Arguably Cake’s most enduring hit, 1996 breakout single “The Distance” rides a distorted guitar riff that pulses throughout the track, providing the perfect platform for lyrics that use the metaphor of a frantic car race.

Fuel Economy: “The Distance” is a perfect marriage of lyrics and music, each taking energy from the other as the track careens towards its climax. It’s unclear whether the main character ever quite reaches his destination — but he’s going for speed, driving and striving as fast as he can nonetheless.

Overdrive: Midway through the song, the beat drops out, leaving just that driving guitar revving things back up for one final lap through the hook, breathlessly “racing and pacing and plotting the course.” — DAN RYS

84. JOHNNY PAYCHECK, “DRINKIN’ AND DRIVIN'” 

Make and Model: This 1980 ditty comes from outlaw country singer and Grand Ole Opry member Johnny Paycheck, whose hard-charging life included a prison stint in the 1990s. The song’s message has not aged particularly well, considering how many people die each year in DUI-related accidents — but in Paycheck’s version, the only pain is the singer’s heartbreak, as he sits behind the wheel with one hand on the wheel and the other on a bottle of cheap wine.

Fuel Economy: Paycheck’s easygoing tenor and whiplash steel guitar deliver a non-stop bevy of automotive wordplay with a breezy cadence and easy-to-remember chorus — which always returns to “I’m gonna be drinkin’ and drivin’ that woman right off of my mind.”

Overdrive: Paycheck details how bad it’s gotten at the end of the song, with a little CB radio slang: “Breaker, Breaker, this is Heartache, now hear me loud and clear/ I got a memory on my tailgate, Lord, and old smokey’s on my rear.” (Smokey, a reference to the Smokey Bear campaign, is CB radio slang for a police car.) — DAVE BROOKS

83. METALLICA, “FUEL”

Make and Model: By the late ’90s, Metallica weren’t often making the same kind of road-ripping rave-ups they did in their thrashy early days — but they turned back the clock and cranked up the MPH for the blazing “Fuel.”

Fuel Economy: Such an obvious pedal-to-the-heavy-metal anthem that the music video pretty much had to be set amidst an old-school stock-car auto race, you really believe the stuff is frontman James Hetfield’s lifeblood when he begs, “Quench my thirrrrrst with GASOLIIIIIIIINE!”

Overdrive: No need for a starters’ pistol on this one, you’re off and running with Hetfield’s classic a cappella opening: “GIMME FUEL, GIMME FIRE, GIMME THAT WHICH I DESIRE!” — A.U.

82. INCUBUS, “DRIVE”

Make and Model: Serving as the California rock band’s lone top 10 hit on the Hot 100, Incubus’ “Drive” reached No. 9 in summer 2001. On the acoustic-driven track, frontman Brandon Boyd isn’t so much taking control of the wheel literally as he it is wrestling it away from his fear, and ultimately finding open road ahead after doing so. 

Fuel Economy: It’s no secret that the best songs to listen to in the car are the ones when everyone can belt out the chorus together. “Drive” provides that in droves — and while we endorse keeping open eyes, we’d suggest transitioning those open arms to grasp the steering wheel. 

Overdrive: Before launching into the pre-chorus for a second time, Boyd asks “Will I choose water over wine/ And hold my own and drive?” before letting out a soaring, wordless “ohhh-ohh-ohhhh.” — JOSH GLICKSMAN

81. THE CLASH, “BRAND NEW CADILLAC”

Make and Model: This 1979 punk belter is The Clash’s take on a 1959 rock’n’roll b-side from Vince Taylor and his Playboys. Joe Strummer’s angst is palpable as his lady pulls up in a fancy new ride just to tell him to piss off. 

Fuel Economy: The song quickly shifts gears from the singer’s excitement that his love is pulling up in a beautiful new Cadillac, to him screaming after her as she leaves him in the dust. 

Overdrive: Strummer can barely contain his emotions as he shouts to his baby, “Jesus Christ, where’d you get that Cadillac?” — TAYLOR MIMS

80. SAMMY HAGAR, “I CAN’T DRIVE 55”

Make and Model: Supposedly inspired by an upstate speeding ticket and a rejoinder offered by the Red Rocker to the officer who pulled him over, Sammy Hagar’s signature solo hit remains a classic anthem for irresponsible rubber-burners.

Fuel Economy: With synths and guitars firing in the background, Hagar offers his impassioned defense like an arena-rock Jean Valjean, making a semi-legitimate case that to deny his need for speed would be a much truer crime than any on-road infractions.

Overdrive: Those pained pauses in the song’s fist-pumping refrain: “I… CAN’T… DRIVE….. FIFTY-FIVE!!!” — A.U.

79. SNIFF ‘N’ THE TEARS, “DRIVER’S SEAT”

Make and Model: The lone hit for Sniff ‘n’ the Tears assured the British rock outfit a permanent place in late-’70s pop culture thanks to its pensive keyboards, growling guitars and alternately dreamy and anxious vocals.

Fuel Economy: With tensely shifting drums and somewhat narratively ambiguous lyrics, “Driver’s Seat” carries the mysterious, anxious allure of a late-night drive where you’re not totally sure what awaits you at your destination — you can almost feel the nervous, exciting tapping on the steering wheel.

Overdrive: The song really reaches fourth gear when everything drops out but those insistent drums and harmonized backing vocals, intoning over and over: “Driver’s seat…. AH-WOO….” — A.U.

78. IGGY POP, “THE PASSENGER”

Make and Model: A garage rock rumination with an irresistibly shambolic riff and sing-song chorus, “The Passenger” was Iggy Pop’s diary of his many hours spent riding shotgun with David Bowie, who produced the parent album, 1977’s Lust for Life.

Fuel Economy: Existing between the reckless abandon of the Stooges and the weary alienation of his solo debut The Idiot, “The Passenger” taps into the romantic solitude of two people driving for seemingly endless miles, gradually dissociating from the world as they lock into a tandem groove.

Overdrive: Just before motoring off into the sunset, Pop drops this beautiful couplet about watching the world from the highway: “All of it is yours and mine / So let’s ride and ride and ride and ride.” — J.L.

77. E-40 FEAT. KEAK DA SNEAK, “TELL ME WHEN TO GO”

Make and Model: E-40 was already a rap legend by the time he made his Warner Bros. Records debut with 2006’s My Ghetto Report Card, but this lead single — which later got an all-star remix from Kanye West, Ice Cube and The Game — marked a moment in the sun for the Bay Area’s hyphy scene.

Fuel economy: A crunk crossover produced by Lil Jon, “Tell Me When to Go” was much leaner than the ATL superproducer’s juggernaut anthems of the early 2000s — but that incessant kick drum still hits with all the heft of a slammed car door. Regardless, the enduring stars here are Keak da Sneak’s cartoonish rasp and the ingeniously simple hook that’s anything but dumb, dumb, dumb.

Overdrive: The call-and-response breakdown that taught the world how to ghost ride the whip. — NOLAN FEENEY

76. JOHN TRAVOLTA, “GREASED LIGHTNIN'”

Make and Model: Part of the soundtrack to the classic 1978 film musical Grease and performed by starring actor John Travolta, “Greased Lightnin’” hit No. 47 on the Hot 100 that same year.

Fuel Economy: Few tracks scream “song about cars” like this one, which references everything from four-barrel quads to a palomino dashboard, and was written for a moment in the film about fixing up a vehicle for an upcoming drag race — and to, of course, woo women.

Overdrive: “Greased Lightnin’” opens at its peak, when Travolta declares: “Well, this car is automatic, it’s systematic, it’s hyyyyydromatic,” with horn flares in between each statement, before announcing with overflowing excitement, “Why it’s Greased Lightning!” — LYNDSEY HAVENS

75. SHERYL CROW, “EVERYDAY IS A WINDING ROAD”

Make and Model: Sheryl Crow’s 1997 pop-rock hit is equal parts existential journey and laid-back joyride – kind of like life.

Fuel Economy: This follows the car-song road map to a T, thanks to a chorus that’s meant to be yelled out of a top-down convertible and an upbeat production that makes you want to drive a little too fast. It wasn’t just destined to be in a car commercial; it is a car commercial.

Overdrive: As she cruises down the winding road of life, Crow wonders if “all the things I’ve seen were ever real, were ever really happening?” Who knows? Just keep driving. — KATIE ATKINSON

74. ROBERT JOHNSON, “TERRAPLANE BLUES”

Make and Model: In 1936, when Johnson first recorded this blues song that takes its title from a car made by the Hudson Motor Company, automotive double entendres were still relatively new – but, then again, so was driving itself. Here, though, Johnson is stalled: “You know, the coils ain’t even buzzin’,” he laments. “The little generator won’t get the spark.”

Fuel Economy: As the song goes along, Johnson reveals that someone’s been driving his Terraplane “since I been gone.” The lyrics resonate with raw emotion — he’s going to weep and moan. He does have insurance, though, in the form of “a woman that I’m lovin’, way down in Arkansas.”

Overdrive: Most great driving songs are about the freedom of the road, but this one, like a few of Johnson’s songs, is about the poison of jealousy. “Please,” he sings, “don’t block the road.” — R.L.

73. DAVE DUDLEY, “SIX DAYS ON THE ROAD”

Make and Model: One of the classic old-school trucker anthems, “Six Days on the Road” — made famous by country singer Dave Dudley in 1963 —  commemorated the grind of load-hauling across the country, dodging cops and downing “little white pills” and doing whatever it takes to make it home ASAP.

Fuel Economy: Among the least-glamorous driving songs of all time, “Six Days” doesn’t celebrate the road so much as present it as an obstacle course, full of pratfalls to be avoided and short cuts to be taken if you know the lay of the land well enough — a wearying life, but one well-observed enough to have its own sort of worn-in, hard-earned dignity.

Overdrive: A song this deep in the drudgery doesn’t have a lot of major highs, but you gotta smile for Dudley a little when he finally reaches his destination in the final verse: “My hometown’s a-comin’ in sight/ If you think I’m happy, you’re right.” — A.U.

72. KISS, “DETROIT ROCK CITY”

Make and Model: Kiss’ car-crash rager became a fan favorite and eventual FM rock standard following its 1976 release, though it only ever charted on the Hot 100 once it was re-released as the B-side to the band’s atypical ballad “Beth,” a surprise top 10 hit that December.

Fuel Economy: Few songs about road fatality have ever been as unapologetically feel-good as “Detroit Rock City,” a song whose excitement over blasting the radio while driving to a concert can’t even be slowed down by oncoming truck headlights — with singer Paul Stanley simply smirking, “I gotta laugh ‘coz I know I’m gonna die.”

Overdrive: The double-tracked guitar interlude, gaining intensity over Peter Criss’ galloping drums, as (appropriately) thrilling and foreboding an instrumental break as you’ll hear in classic rock. — A.U.

71. ACE HOOD FEAT. FUTURE, “BUGATTI” 

Make and Model: Florida rapper Ace Hood merged into mainstream consciousness — and onto the Hot 100 — with his menacing 2013 trap anthem about the material perks of success, from watches to women to the song’s titular luxury ride.

Fuel Economy: From Mike WiLL Made It’s hyper-layered production to Future’s sing-song pre-chorus, a larger-than-life feature from Rick Ross and Hood’s own rapid-fire verses, this song takes on different speeds with the fluidity of an expertly handled manual transmission.

Overdrive: While waking up in one’s car isn’t necessarily a write-home-about accomplishment, the song’s explosive shout-along chorus — “I woke up in the new Bugatti!!” — is used more metaphorically to express the thrill of coming up so hard (and so overnight) that you can suddenly afford a car whose base model retails for $1.7 million. — KATIE BAIN

70. OMC, “HOW BIZARRE” 

Make and Model: New Zealand’s Otara Millionaires Club had their lone international hit in 1997 with “How Bizarre,” a surreal road odyssey in which the group gets pulled over by the cops, stops for gas, runs into a traveling circus and then speeds away from all the fracas — with only the titular two-word summary to tie it all together.

Fuel Economy: The lyrics might not make a ton of sense on paper, but they add up to the kind of road trip adventure that bonds a group of friends together because it could never make sense to anyone who wasn’t there — and that title and accompanying guitar cascade is all the explanation anyone else really needs, anyway.

Overdrive: After having related enough of his travels with Brother Pele and Sister Zina, frontman Pauly Fuemana declares it’ll cost extra for you to find out their journey’s end: “Wanna know the rest? Hey — buy the rights!” — A.U.

69. PEARL JAM, “REARVIEWMIRROR”

Make and Model: Such a fan favorite of an album cut that it became the title of Pearl Jam’s greatest hits album two decades later, “RVM” takes a traveling guitar riff from frontman Eddie Vedder and follows it along through its highway metaphor to an angsty — this was early-1990s grunge, after all — and grand conclusion.

Fuel Economy: From its opening lyric (“I took a drive today/ Time to emancipate”) to the wide-eyed visual of its hook (“Saw things so much clearer/ Once you were in my rear view mirror”), Vedder combines both the tensions of trying to overcome obstacles in life with the freedom of finally achieving it and speeding away into the distance.

Fourth Gear: With the song picking up intensity and the drums getting louder and more frantic, Vedder leans into a final bridge with one last release and an epic scream, “REAR VIEW MIRRORRRRR” that, when performed live, never fails to bring the house down. — DAN RYS

68. RICKIE LEE JONES, “THE LAST CHANCE TEXACO”

Make and Model: The Grammy-nominated 1979 ballad uses a lonely filling station on the outskirts of town as an allegory for settling for what’s available to you, whether it’s a relationship or a conveniently located gas pump.

Fuel Economy: The strummy number is packed with so many automotive metaphors (“her plug’s disconnected, she gets scared and she stalls,” “her timing’s all wrong,” “she can’t idle this long,” “turn her over and go,” etc.) that Rickie should consider a retirement job as a Car and Driver writer.

Overdrive: But of all the song’s metaphors, none gets more mileage than the supercharged verse that incorporates no less than four gas station company names: “Well, he tried to be Standard and he tried to be Mobil/ He tried living in a World and in a Shell.” — K.A.

67. M83, “MIDNIGHT CITY” 

Make and Model: The 2011 smash hit doesn’t offer an abundance of lyrics, but the few key lines detail (and were inspired by) a sort of backseat wonder at a sprawling metropolis viewed through car windows — though its ethereal synth pop feel and roaring saxophone to close implores listeners to refrain from “waiting” for anything, regardless of what M83’s Anthony Gonzalez says. 

Fuel Economy: Save the track’s closing minute for the time on your drive when the city’s lights shine the brightest. The very moment that saxophone kicks in, a wave of euphoria will wash over you – it’s a feeling that few songs from the past decade have been able to so prominently capture. Make sure to crank the stereo. 

Overdrive: Have we mentioned the song’s outro yet?  — J.G.

66. SELENA, “LA CARCACHA”

Make and Model: Selena Quintanilla dropped “La Carcacha” in 1992, and it would become one of the most emblematic songs of her career. Co-produced by her brother A.B. Quintanilla III and Bebu Silvetti, the track showcased just exactly how Selena y Los Dinos were revolutionizing the Tejano music industry in the ‘90s, fusing traditional cumbia, tejano, alternative rock melodies, and even incorporating car honks in the track.

Fuel Economy: If the “beep beep” throughout the track is any indication, this is the ultimate Latin pop car song. But above that, it’s the humble lyrics that make it 100 percent relatable for fans: Selena sings about getting made fun of because she’s dating a guy with a broken-down car. She comes to his defense saying that despite his old car with tailpipe smoke, tricycle-like wheels, and backward engine, her boyfriend is faithful and treats her like a queen.

Overdrive: For the most part, this track keeps everyone on their feet from beginning to end — but it’s the song’s first 30 seconds that really became a fan-favorite — especially during the TikTok era, with the countdown (“uno, dos, tres, cuatro”) and upbeat production getting users of all ages to imitate Selena’s arm-swaying and hip-shaking dance moves. — JESSICA ROIZ

65. TIM MCGRAW, “RED RAGTOP” 

Make and Model: McGraw poignantly delivers the rare country song to address abortion (though the word is never mentioned) from 2002’s Tim McGraw and the Dancehall Doctors.

Fuel Economy: The full-circle details of McGraw’s relationship are devastating: He was 20, she was 18 when they first made love in his “red ragtop” — which he later explains is the same car he drove to take her for her abortion, and the same car where he reveals “she stopped loving me.”

Overdrive: Though he never specifies the make of his car, years later, the protagonist stops at a red light and beside him is a young woman with the same green eyes as his teenage sweetheart in a Cabriolet, as he realizes there’s no going back: “Well, you do what you do and you pay for your sins/ And there’s no such thing as what might have been.” — M. Newman

64. MISSY ELLIOTT, “THE RAIN (SUPA DUPA FLY)” 

Make and Model: Missy’s Ann Peebles-reinventing 1997 breakthrough hit introduced the world to one of pop music’s new larger-than-life figures, the rapper-singer cruising into the mainstream with writer/producer buddy Timbaland in the passenger seat.

Fuel Economy: “The Rain” features verses of Missy observing the titular weather nastiness through her home window while smoking weed, and sitting on a hill undeterred as it starts falling on her umbrella — but in between, she takes a memorable drive to the beach, maintaining her way through what looks like an oncoming downpour.

Overdrive: “Beep beep, who got that keys to my jeep?/ VRRRRRRRRRMMM” — simply one of the most memorable (and oft-quoted) car lyrics in hip-hop history. — A.U.

63. JAN & DEAN, “DEAD MAN’S CURVE”

Make and Model: This song about a street race that ended in tragedy became the duo’s fourth top 10 hit on the Hot 100 in May 1964 — score one for the Americans amid the British Invasion. The duo’s Jan Berry co-wrote the song and produced and arranged the single under Lou Adler’s supervision.

Fuel Economy: The song mentions the names of actual streets you’ll encounter cruising down Sunset Blvd. in Los Angeles, adding extra real-life gravity to the California cautionary tale.

Overdrive: The spoken word interlude in which singer Dean Torrence, post-crash, tells a doctor, “Well, the last thing I remember doc, I started to swerve …” Eerily, in April 1966, Berry was involved in near-fatal collision near the spot depicted in the song. – PAUL GREIN 

62. DOOBIE BROTHERS, “ROCKIN’ DOWN THE HIGHWAY” 

Make and Model: Few things go as well together as rock’n’roll and the open highway, and this album cut off the sophomore release from the original Doobie Brothers takes that simple formula and distills it into its purest form with this song’s hook: “Woahh, rockin’ down the highway!” Chef’s kiss.

Fuel Economy: The song is an ode to speed, with lyrics that propel each verse directly towards where it needs to be: the unbridled release of the hook. There’s nothing overly complicated or even particularly inventive or witty about the song, but that’s not the point — the point is to go faster, outrun the cops, and just keep it moving.

Overdrive: Besides the obvious, the song’s best part is the pre-chorus, which underlines the manic energy that the song exudes: “Can’t stop, and I can’t stop/ Got to keep on movin’ or I’ll lose my mind!” — D.R.

61. TRAE THE TRUTH FEAT. FAT PAT & BIG HAWK, “SWANG” 

Make and Model: Released in 2005 when he was still known just as “Trae,” the booming “Swang” never charted nationally, but became an enduring local anthem in the rapper’s Houston hometown.

Fuel Economy: Most great car songs make your foot heavier on the gas pedal, but “Swang” turns the open road into a school zone with its slow-and-low groove, making anyone going over 25 look like Mario Andretti.

Overdrive: The trunk-popping legacy of “Swang” was borrowed in large part from its late featured guest Fat Pat, whose verse on DJ DMD’s “25 Lighters” offered the song its classic screwed-and-chopped chorus, and who guest rapper Big Hawk shouts out on his own verse: “I’m Fat Pat’s clone, his legacy carries on/ His heartbeat pumps through my flesh and bone.” — A.U.

60. EDDIE RABBIT, “DRIVIN’ MY LIFE AWAY” 

Make and Model: Country singer Eddie Rabbitt found crossover success with this jaunty rockabilly jam featured in the 1980 movie Roadie, which starred Meat Loaf and included the tagline, “The bands make it rock, but the roadies make it roll.”

Fuel Economy: Whether you’re a trucker, a roadie or just someone logging hours behind the wheel, “Drivin’” turns your slog of a drive into a bouncy quest for a sunny day.

Overdrive: Rabbitt reaching that rare moment of car-and-tune synchronicity: “Those windshield wipers slapping out a tempo/Keeping perfect rhythm with the song on the radio.” — C.W.

59. RADIOHEAD, “AIRBAG”

Make and Model: Kicking off their 1997 post-Britpop masterpiece OK Computer, Radiohead’s “Airbag” finds lead singer Thom Yorke in a mess of pre-millennial anxieties, with his recurringfear of cars reappearing at the song’s core.

FuelEconomy: A jarring sonic melange of twinkling sleigh bells, sawing cello riffs and guitars that are equally majestic and nauseous-sounding, the non-fatal lyrical crash of “Airbag” resonates because the music sounds as simultaneously rattled and relieved as Yorke himself.

Overdrive: “In a fast German car/ I’m amazed that I survived/ An airbag saved my life,” the frontman proclaims — an obviously life-affirming moment that still quickly gives way to an uneasy sensation of “Now what?” — A.U.

58. MAREN MORRIS, “’80S MERCEDES”

Make and Model: This fun-loving track, which Morris co-wrote with the late busbee, arrived as the second single off her 2016 full-length debut album, Hero. 

Fuel Economy: Morris manages to make a song about a car from a time before she was born feel entirely her own, with lines like “She ain’t made for practicality/ Yeah, I guess she’s just like me.” Plus, with details peppered throughout like the hula girl on the dash, fans could easily imagine an accompanying visual without ever seeing the music video.

Overdrive: The song’s early chorus — “Feel like a hard-to-get starlet when I’m driving” — evokes such a visceral liberation and perfectly sets up the Instagram-caption-ready climax that repeats: “I’m a ’90s baby/ In my ’80s Mercedes.” — L.H.

57. DEPECHE MODE, “BEHIND THE WHEEL”

Make and Model: The third single off the synth-rock band’s platinum-selling 1987 release Music For the Masses, the dark tune sees frontman Dave Gahan ceding control for ultimate pleasure.

Fuel Economy: The Anton Corbijn-directed video may offer a throwback to the same BMW Isetta that was featured in “Never Let Me Down Again,” but the vehicle this song conjures is sleeker and dirtier — and we mean that in the best way — as Gahan’s low voice revs with desire for his “little girl” to “do what you want.”

Overdrive: Is there such a thing as *under*drive? Because Gahan’s yearning for submission is palpable from the outset: “My little girl, drive anywhere/ Do what you want, I don’t care/ Tonight, I’m in the hands of fate/ I hand myself over on a plate now.” — ANNA CHAN

56. JERRY REED, “EAST BOUND AND DOWN”

Make and Model: Few songs can summarize an entire film in just a few verses like “East Bound and Down,” the fast-paced, banjo heavy hit for the bootlegging blockbuster Smokey and the Bandit — with Reed in a starring role aside Burt Reynolds and Sally Field.

Fuel Economy: You don’t have to know CB radio lingo to understand this rollicking track, which is filled with trucker references like “Ole Smokeys got them ears on” — meaning then police are listening for chatter on the airwaves — while “East Bound and Down” is a popular sign for drivers meaning they’re no longer transmitting, but likely still listening as they pull over for a brief rest.

Overdrive: The song’s stakes are set from the opening stanza: “The boys are thirsty in Atlanta / And there’s beer in Texarkana / And we’ll bring it back no matter what it takes.” — D.B.

55. BEYONCÉ, “PARTITION”

Make and Model: Acting as the back-half of “Yonce” from Beyonce’s 2013 self-titled album, “Partition” does not pump the brakes while detailing the Queen’s fantasies of having sex with her husband Jay-Z in the back of a limousine on the way to the club — one the occupied couple doesn’t really plan on making it into. 

Fuel Economy: With the sound of a car window rolling up to signal the transition from “Yonce” to “Partition,” the subsequent synth arrangements sound like the limo zooming through the city while capturing the thrill of Bey and Jay’s own wild ride in the back seat. 

Overdrive: The Queen’s alter-ego ordering her limo driver not to watch any of the action: “Driver, roll up the partition, please/ I don’t need you seeing ‘Yonce on her knees.” — HERAN MAMO

54. THE SMITHS, “THERE IS A LIGHT THAT NEVER GOES OUT”

Make and Model: A classic moper from Moz and company off their iconic 1986 album The Queen is Dead, in which the eternally glum singer pines to go out and see people and live the life of a care-free joy rider.

Fuel Economy: The acoustic reverie with dramatic strings not only muses about being in a car to nowhere, but it doubles down on its auto-erotic fantasy when Morrissey dreams about him and his lover being wiped out on the road together.

Overdrive: If you think there’s anything on Earth more romantic than the line, “And if a 10-ton truck/ Kills the both of us/ To die by your side/ Well, the pleasure, the privilege is mine,” we don’t know what to tell you. — GIL KAUFMAN

53. RONNY AND THE DAYTONAS, “G.T.O.”

Make and Model: Written and performed by John Wilkin, this surf rock number pays homage to America’s favorite muscle car, the Pontiac GTO, which could “turn it on, wind it up (and) blow it out” with an engine growl that could be heard from blocks away.

Fuel Economy: The 1964 track, released just one year after the GM vehicle debuted on U.S. streets, was written by a teenage Wilkin and recorded with Nashville producer Bill Justis and session players — but still captured enough on-road giddiness with its verse ravings and wordless “wah-wah” chorus to hit No. 4 on the Hot 100 that September.

Overdrive: Wilkin shows off his car knowledge in the opening lyrics, hailing the cars “three deuces and a four-speed / and a three-eighty-nine.” The three deuces were a reference to the GTO’s unique three double-barreled carburetors, four speed described the car’s transmission while three-eighty-nine was a nod to the V8 engine’s large size, measuring 389 cubic-inches. — D.B.

52. KANYE WEST FEAT. PAUL WALL & GLC, “DRIVE SLOW”

Make and Model: Released as a late single from Kanye West’s second studio album, Late Registration, “Drive Slow” featuring Paul Wall and GLC is a warning tale to anyone who might think it’s cool to live life in the fast lane.

Fuel Economy: “Drive Slow” is the perfect song for a late-night car ride, with its slow groove and deep nostalgic narrative that delivers a word to the wise about resisting temptation — on the road and elsewhere.

Overdrive: Kanye dominates the proceedings with one line of advice that defines the song, “Don’t rush to get grown, drive slow homie.” — D.A.

51. ARETHA FRANKLIN, “FREEWAY OF LOVE”

Make and Model: This smash reached No. 3 on the Hot 100 in August 1985, becoming Franklin’s highest-charting hit in more than a decade. The Queen was 43 when the song was released, not too old to put the top down and go cruising – in more ways than one. “How’d you get your pants so tight?” is a come-on line for the ages.

Fuel Economy: The song, produced by Narada Michael Walden, has that mid-’80s top 40 radio sound, and Clarence Clemons’ sax solo adds fire — but there’s not one moment where Franklin is not firmly in the driver’s seat.

Overdrive: On the line “City traffic moving way too slow/Drop your pedal and go,” Franklin gets more mileage out of the word “drop” than any other singer could have. Another nice touch: The license plate on Franklin’s pink Cadillac in the video reads: “RESPECT.” – P.G. 

50. THE BEACH BOYS, “FUN, FUN, FUN”

Make and Model: With its “Johnny B. Goode“-inspired electric guitar intro and lyrics about blowing off the library to go cruising, The Beach Boys’ 1964 hit is sonically and lyrically synonymous with the easygoing West Coast aesthetic.

Fuel Economy: In Southern California, the lure of ditching school for the beach and burgers is a constant temptation for licensed teens. “Fun, Fun, Fun” zeroes in on that unique balance between work and fun that so many Golden State high schoolers try and fail to achieve.

Overdrive: There’s only one way to listen to this song, and it’s by driving down Pacific Coast Highway with the radio blasting, sunroof open, and a bag of In-N-Out strapped to your front seat — with the song’s “Well she got her daddy’s car/ And she cruised through the hamburger stand now” opening lines ringing in your ears for the full effect. — MIA NAZARENO

49. NIO GARCIA x BRRAY x JUANKA x ANUEL AA x MYKE TOWERS, “LA JEEPETA” (REMIX)

Make and Model: In early 2020, Puerto Rican artist Nio Garcia teamed up with Brray and Juanka to unleash the catchy mid-tempo reggaetón single “La Jeepeta.” But it was the remix, aided by Anuel AA and Myke Towers, that ignited its success on the charts; while the original failed to secure a spot on Hot Latin Songs, the remix peaked at No. 3 in August.

Fuel Economy: Built around slang for an SUV truck or Jeep, with raunchy lyrics and a bounce perfect for large-vehicle travel, the song was met with skepticism from Garcia’s team — but he insisted it was destined for big things. “From the day the intro and the chorus were created, I knew this song was going to be a hit,” Garcia told Billboard last July.

Overdrive: The chorus lyrics are particularly graphic: “Getting high in the jeep/ Next to me I have a blonde [girl] with big boobs/ She wants me to put it in.”  But that seems to be part of its appeal: Most of the 1.6 million Jeepeta dances on YouTube, for example, have both men and women making the universal gestures to describe big boobs or having intercourse. — J.R.

48. DEEP PURPLE, “HIGHWAY STAR”

Make and Model: Opener to classic rock virtuosos Deep Purple’s 1972 signature set Machine Head, “Highway Star” rides a mix of adrenaline and ego as singer Ian Gillian sounds equally in love with his car, his girl and himself over his band’s intoxicating open-road motoring.

Fuel Economy: “Highway Star” quite simply goes for it, with a full-band commitment to playing harder, faster and longer than their peers, and ending up with a blazing track quite worthy of the “killer machine” the song celebrates.

Overdrive: The song’s instrumental intro builds to such a memorable fever pitch, with Gillian’s falsetto wail coming in over the top of the band’s heavy chugging, that it was used as the opening music for the Rock Band video game. — A.U.

47. CALVIN HARRIS FEAT. FUTURE & KHALID, “ROLLIN”

Make and Model: “Rollin” helped roll out Harris’ 2017 album Funk Wav Bounces Vol. 1 as its third single, with Khalid and Future’s featured vocals about leaving a soon-to-be-ex in their rearview riding the cruise-controlled wave of the song’s looped synth-funk beat.

Fuel Economy: Khalid and Future’s anecdotes about their past relationships certify going for a drive as the prime antidote for having too much on one’s mind, making the track a perfect road trip playlist addition. 

Overdrive: Khalid’s chorus setting the tone for the need for speed: “I’ve been rollin’ on the freeway/ I’ve been riding 85/ I’ve been thinking way too much/ And I’m way too gone to drive.” — H.M.

46. 2PAC, “PICTURE ME ROLLIN'” 

Make and Model: On this fan favorite from the 1996 All Eyez on Me double album, a fresh-out-of-jail 2Pac wants everyone to forget about all his problems and just picture him rollin’ in his Mercedes.

Fuel Economy: This is the ultimate carefree car song, from a man who had plenty to care about. But with haters and critics everywhere, he wanted all his enemies to see just how blessed (not stressed) he was, over laid-back drums and guitar pops that certainly aided his demonstration.

Overdrive: In the song’s unforgettably DGAF outro, Pac has one message for all his haters, including the prison he was just bailed out of, “all you punk police” and the DA who charged him: “Any time y’all wanna see me again, rewind this track right here, close your eyes, and picture me rollin’.” — K.A.

45. CARRIE UNDERWOOD, “BEFORE HE CHEATS”

Make and Model: Underwood was fresh off her 2005 American Idol win when she released her debut album Some Hearts, whose third single “Before He Cheats” became a massive crossover hit — hitting No. 1 on Hot Country Songs, No. 8 on the Hot 100, winning Grammys for best female country vocal performance and best country song and entering the canon of all-time karaoke classics.

Fuel Economy: This pop/country anthem runs on sweet revenge. The fantasy of taking a baseball bat to your cheating lover’s precious ride is popular among those of us who’ve ever been romantically scorned, but what’s just as delicious here is the seething, sarcastic contempt Underwood expresses for both him and the “bleached-blond tramp” he’s got in the passenger’s seat.

Overdrive: Underwood doesn’t stop with just taking “a Louisville Slugger to both headlights,” instead further demonstrating that hell hath no fury by keying his “pretty little souped-up four-wheel drive,” carving her name into his leather seats and, to really bring her point home — and to make sure he doesn’t get back to his — slashing all four tires. — K.B.

44. A TRIBE CALLED QUEST, “I LEFT MY WALLET IN EL SEGUNDO”

Make and Model: “I Left My Wallet in El Segundo” is a storytelling saga of an inconvenient mishap in the midst of an impromptu vacation, taken from NY rap greats A Tribe Called Quest’s 1990 debut album, People’s Instinctive Travels and the Paths of Rhythm. 

Fuel Economy: Q-Tip flexes his anecdotal skills throughout the breezy, playful track, which depicts a cross-country road trip with Ali, Jarobi and Phife Dawg from Brooklyn, New York to El Segundo, California in a ‘74 Dodge Dart.

Overdrive: With a story that’s completely mapped out from beginning to end, listeners can’t miss any of the detours that take place on this musical adventure from the Tribe. — D.A.

43. JOHNNY CASH, “I’VE BEEN EVERYWHERE” 

Make and Model: This well-traveled travelogue was written in 1958 by Australian country singer Geoff Mack and popularized in 1962 by another Aussie performer Lucky Starr (Leslie William Morrison). Many covers have followed, but Cash’s version, recorded with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers for the Man in Black’s 1996 Unchained album, is the one that’s ingrained in 21st century pop culture — thanks to its use in episodes of The Simpsons and Family Guy, a Choice Hotels commercial and at least two films.

Fuel Economy: While the only vehicle mentioned is “a semi with a high and canvas-covered load,” the song racks up mileage faster than a Ferrari. In a little over three minutes, Cash cites 90 states, cities, towns and countries while backed by Petty and Co.’s Bakersfield country-rock vibe. A website that maps all of the destinations calculates a total distance traveled of almost 108,425 miles.

Overdrive: The first verse finds the singer hitchhiking in Winnemucca, Nevada, a town that, in 2020, had a population of less than 7,800 people. When he jumps in the semi cab, the driver asks him, “if I’d seen a road with so much dust and sand.” Cash’s assured response is “Listen, I’ve traveled every road in this here land!” –F.D.

42. MIKE JONES FEAT. SLIM THUG & PAUL WALL, “STILL TIPPIN'” 

Make and Model: A mid-’00s single that helped put Houston hip-hop on the national map and make stars out of its three performers, “Still Tippin” had kids across the country bragging about “tippin’ on fo’ fos, wrapped in fo’ Vogues” even if they had no clue about the rims and tires those chorus lyrics actually referred to.

Fuel Economy: The song’s narcotic crawl lets you know just how differently they do it in H-Town, but the song’s dark beauty and bottomless supply of cool makes it an exhilarating ride even when it’s coasting in neutral.

Overdrive: Paul Wall’s claim to having “the Internet going nuts” has proven the song’s most enduring lyric, but its finest car couplet remains Mike Jones’ boast “Catch me lane switchin’ with the paint drippin’/ Turn your neck and your dame missin’.” — A.U.

41. TOM PETTY, “RUNNIN’ DOWN A DREAM”

Make and Model: Tom Petty’s solo debut sans Heartbreakers, 1989’s Full Moon Fever, was mostly memorable for its lush acoustic rock and breezy Jeff Lynne production — but he still plugged in and riffed out for the piston-churning  “Runnin’ Down a Dream,” a guitar mini-epic custom designed for classic rock radio.

Fuel Economy: For as action-packed as the song sounds, not much actually happens in its lyrics: Tom sings along to “Runaway” on the radio, puts on cruise control for a while, then speeds back up again. But it still feels Homeric, since the real narrative is all happening in Petty’s head — as is the case with anyone on the road working on their own mystery, and following wherever it leads.

Overdrive: That climactic solo, man. Shout out to Mike Campbell. — A.U.

40. BILLY OCEAN, “GET OUTTA MY DREAMS, GET INTO MY CAR”

Make and Model: The British/Trinidadian singer scored his third U.S. No. 1 Billboard 200 hit with this 1988 song in which he begs a woman to… well, the title says it all.

Fuel Economy: The super-’80s pop tune tries to make an unprompted backseat invitation sound like a winning lottery ticket, and comes shockingly close to succeeding. Featured in the legendary Corey and Corey (Haim and Feldman) film License to Drive, the song was also accompanied by a then-ground-breaking video that mixed footage of Ocean driving a variety of slick rides through a car wash, with animation of fish and boom box-wielding ducks.

Overdrive: The lascivious lyrics would probably not pass muster today, but you kind of have to chuckle at the iconic pick-up line: “Lady driver let me take your wheel/ Smooth operator/ Touch my bumper/ Hey, let’s make a deal/ Make it real.” — G.K.

39. LUDACRIS FEAT. MYSTIKAL & I-20, “MOVE B—H” 

Make and Model: Luda power steered into the top 10 of the Hot 100 for the first time with “Move B—h,” the fourth single from his 2001 LP, Word of Mouf.

Fuel Economy: An almost cartoonishly ominous singalong classic for anyone who came of age in the early 2000s, “”Move B—h” is equal parts road rage and precision driving. Luda — along with guest stars Mystikal and I-20 — careens past “all the groupies and gold diggers” and other sundry haters, threatening that these bystanders “about to get ran the f–k over” while he maneuvers towards a stage where the spotlight is as glaring as his brights.

Overdrive: Ludacris compares the power, velocity and general unstoppability of his career to doing a hundred on the highway, emphasizing his intent to take no prisoners by adding that, “if you do the speed limit, get the f–k outta my way!” — K.B.

38. TAYLOR SWIFT, “GETAWAY CAR”

Make and Model: While memories of Taylor Swift’s Reputation era are often eclipsed by the rebrand into her edgier, more dangerous alter ego, the pop star’s songwriting about a dramatic love triangle on 2017’s “Getaway Car” (which she co-wrote Jack Antonoff) remains a standout track — one that we regularly revisit four years after its debut.

Fuel Economy: You haven’t lived until you’ve looked your partner in crime in the eye and said, “Let’s run away together.” “Getaway Car” captures that fantasy of escaping — even if you are taking a shortcut through a doomed relationship. Lyrically and visually, Swift’s singing of “When he was running after us, I was screaming ‘Go, go, go!'” invites us into her backseat as she makes a run for it.

Overdrive: Taylor reveals it all in the bridge when she sings in hushed tones, “I’m in a getaway car/ I left you in the motel bar/ Put the money in the bag and stole the keys/ That was the last time you ever saw me” before she revs the engine to the chorus back up. The plot twist of leaving both lovers in the end is the song’s power move, and one that’ll help keep Reputation relevant during future Taylor Swift eras to come. — M. Nazareno

37. THE WALLFLOWERS, “ONE HEADLIGHT”

Make and Model: The 1997 hit may not have charted on the Hot 100 due to eligibility rules at the time, but the song frontman Jakob Dylan says is about “perseverance” nevertheless drove its way to the top of the Greatest of All Time Adult Alternative Songs Chart 25 years later.

Fuel Economy: The lyrics merge with a sound that combines classic rock and a catchy ’90s radio feel to paint picture after picture of frustration transformed into opportunity. It’s the stuff of daydreams (and scream-sing material — with the windows rolled down, of course) while on a peaceful expanse of road … or while stuck in infuriating gridlock traffic.

Overdrive: After the darkness in the verses, the chorus feels like the rising sun coming up over the horizon to spread hope on an empty road: “Come on try a little/ Nothing is forever/ There’s gotta be something better than in the middle … We can drive it home/ With one headlight.” — A.C.

36. TOM COCHRANE, “LIFE IS A HIGHWAY”

Make and Model: Cochrane was a household name in Canada as the singer of band Red Rider long before 1991 — but that’s when he committed full-stop to one very lengthy metaphor and turned it into this propulsive global hit, which ultimately peaked at No. 6 on the Hot 100. (Just one indication of its enduring auto appeal: Rascal Flatts’ cover, for Pixar’s….yes, Cars… which brought the song back to the top 10 in 2006).

Fuel Economy: It’s scientifically impossible not to belt “Life is a highway/I wanna ride it all night long” while driving on a highway at, really, any time of day. But it’s not just the road-friendly lyrics that make this Road Trip Radio Canon — Cochrane’s percussive guitar and harmonica lines seem to always perfectly soundtrack scenery at the speed it flies by, plus they’re easy to tap out on steering-wheel percussion.

Overdrive: At precisely the 3 minute mark, the a cappella chorus reprise: a moment so perfect for boogie-ing in your seat that the Canadian youths in the music video pop out of theirs and just start to dance next to their convertible by the side of the road. — R.M.

35. GRACE JONES, “PULL UP TO THE BUMPER”

Make and Model: Hailing from Grace Jones’ 1981 classic Nightclubbing, “Pull Up to the Bumper” finds the pop provocateur melding disco, dub and electro; it took her to No. 2 on Dance Club Songs and No. 5 on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart.

Fuel Economy: Artists have been milking the driving-as-sex innuendo since at least the mid-1930s, but few have gotten as much mileage out of it as Jones on this fabulously filthy invitation to a lover.

Overdrive: If you don’t know what’s going on by the time she’s telling someone to take their “long black limousine” and “drive it in between” her bumper, well, maybe “drivers license” is more your speed. — J.L.

34. GRATEFUL DEAD, “TRUCKIN'” 

Make and Model: This super-laid-back 1970 ramble from the Dead’s beloved American Beauty album gave the grandaddy jam band the biggest Hot 100 hit of their first 20 years — as well as perhaps their all-time most singular mantra.

Fuel Economy: For a group that inspired so many Deadheads to hit the road and follow them on the tour that never ends, this travelogue highlights some of the group’s wilder early adventures on four wheels. From the “neon and flashing marquees on Main Street” to their terrible highway diet (“Livin’ on reds, vitamin C and cocaine”) and cooling their heels in a hotel room waiting for cops to bust down the door, this one depicts the wild life of a traveling musician with a wicked, knowing grin.

Overdrive: The chorus, of course: “Sometimes the light’s all shinin’ on me/ Other times I can barely see/ Lately, it occurs to me/ What a long, strange trip it’s been.” — G.K.

33. FRANK OCEAN, “SWIM GOOD”

Make and Model: Frank Ocean’s debut mixtape nostalgia, ULTRA grabbed the attention of the industry upon its 2011 release, with the lyrically dark “Swim Good” exploring themes of trying to deal with overwhelming heartbreak while behind the wheel, and emerging as one of the project’s biggest highlights. 

Fuel Economy: The brooding nature of “Swim Good” can quickly wind its way around your head and your heart. It’s easy to get lost while listening, but in a way that ultimately feels freeing – just remember that if your GPS is the one suggesting you drive into a body of water, it’s a safe bet to assume there’s no road there. 

Overdrive: In his second run through the pre-chorus, Frank Ocean dials it up as the real estate in front of him rapidly dwindles: “One more ‘til the road runs out, out!” — J.G.

32. DON HENLEY, “THE BOYS OF SUMMER”

Make and Model: When Tom Petty was underwhelmed by the original demo for this eventual No. 5 Billboard Hot 100 hit, Heartbreakers guitarist Mike Campbell played the song for Don Henley, who was looking for material for 1984 sophomore solo set Building The Perfect Beast. Campbell told the podcast The Moment that the following day, Henley called him to say, “I just wrote the best song of my life to your music” — and a 1986 Grammy for best male rock vocal performance supports that claim.

Fuel Economy:  The specific car references are subtle (“You got the top pulled down and the radio on, baby”), but “Boys of Summer” unquestionably plays like a slow, melancholy drive through an empty beach town as summer turns to fall. Backed by Campbell’s languid guitar and the Linn drum’s relentless delayed rimshots – which, to quote another Henley song, sound like “time, time ticking, ticking away” — the song becomes a metaphor for growing older and clinging to past ideals that don’t (or can’t) exist in the present.

Overdrive: In the third verse, Henley sings: “Out on the road today, I saw a Deadhead sticker on a Cadillac. A little voice inside my head said, “Don’t look back, you can never look back.” Inspired by a real-life experience on the San Diego Freeway, Henley has said that the jarring and oft-quoted car imagery essentially reference the hippies of the ‘60s selling out to become the yuppies of the ‘80s. –F.D.

31. CYNDI LAUPER, “I DROVE ALL NIGHT”

Make and Model: A widescreen power ballad originally intended for Roy Orbison (who recorded it but never released it in his lifetime), “I Drove All Night” became a No. 6 Hot 100 hit and Grammy-nominated vocal showcase for Cyndi Lauper off her 1989 album A Night to Remember; in 2003, Celine Dion revved it up for another Hot 100 run.

Fuel Economy: Over urgent strings and a pounding ’80s rock drum, Lauper spins a feverish, lusty tale of escaping the “sticky and cruel” city to hit the highway, with her lover’s cool caresses serving as the rose-red fingers of dawn at the end of a long, dark highway odyssey.

Overdrive: Lauper takes it off cruise control pretty early on, but when she switches up an octave mid-syllable at the 2:57 money note, it’s obvious her tank is running on premium. — J.L.

30. JACKSON BROWNE, “RUNNING ON EMPTY”

Make and Model: Music fans were stricken with a bad case of Saturday Night Fever in the spring of 1978, but there was still room on top 40 radio for this propulsive pop/rock track, which reached No. 11 that April. The song is autobiographical, reflective and exhilarating — a rare combination.

Fuel Economy: The song opens with an immediate backbeat, allowing it to immediately jump from 0 to 60. The song’s brisk tempo replicates what Browne recalls doing when he was 17 — running up California’s Highway 101.

Overdrive:.The song conveys some profound truths that give it unexpected depth. Who can’t relate to lines like “I don’t know when that road turned onto the road I’m on” and “You know, I don’t even know what I’m hoping to find”? — P.G.

29. ICE CUBE, “IT WAS A GOOD DAY”

Make and Model: Ice Cube paints a musical picture of what makes an ideal day in his native L.A.: cruising the streets, watching the Lakers beat the Supersonics, eating a Fatburger and not using your AK. With the laid-back 1993 song peaking at No. 15, Cube f–ked around and got his highest-charting single ever on the Hot 100.

Fuel Economy: Following in the tire tracks of War’s 1975 classic, Cube is specifically driving a lowrider in this song, boasting that he can both “make the ass drop” and “hit the three-wheel motion” over the course of his ride.

Overdrive: As he’s driving home after hooking up with his high school crush, instead of seeing an omnipresent “helicopter looking for a murder,” Ice Cube spots the welcome sight of the Goodyear Blimp — reading, of course, “Ice Cube‘s a Pimp.” A good day, indeed. — K.A.

28. VAN HALEN, “PANAMA”

Make andModel: Penned in stubborn response to criticism that the band only wrote about sex, drugs and fast cars — which made frontman David Lee Roth realize he’d never actually tried his hand at a proper driving song before — “Panama” was a stunningly sleek machine for a first-time effort.

Fuel Economy: As to be expected, even Roth’s car songs sound downright lascivious, with the showman singer bragging “Don’t you know she’s coming home with me/ You’ll lose her in that turn,” as sideman Eddie Van Halen audibly sets fire to his six-string on the scorching pre-chorus riff.

Overdrive: Nothing quite like that spoken-word bridge, when in between engine roars, Roth purrs the narration, “You reach down between my legs, and… eeeeeeeaaaaaaaase the seat back.” — A.U.

27. WILSON PICKETT, “MUSTANG SALLY”

Make and Model: A funky, slow-grooving R&B hit for Wilson Pickett in 1966, “Mustang Sally” is an anguished rebuke to a woman who’s gifted a brand-new car and promptly speeds off, leaving her would-be sugar daddy in the dust.

Fuel Economy: With crisp percussion, a solid bass groove and hot licks spitting out from the electric organ, “Mustang Sally” oozes ’60s R&B cool. This isn’t about driving from Point A to Point B — it’s the soundtrack to a boastful, luxurious ride around town in your toy.

Overdrive: Pickett sells his exasperation nicely, but when those backup vocals chime in on the lady’s side with “ride, Sally, ride,” it’s clear we’re all gunning to ride shotty with Sally. — J.L.

26. RIHANNA, “SHUT UP AND DRIVE”

Make and Model: On the follow-up to an early career-defining chart-topper in “Umbrella,” Rihanna switched gears and fired up the engines for this smoother-than-a-limousine electro-rocking single, proving her output of pop smashes would never merely come off the assembly line.

Fuel Economy: Running lean and mean, “Shut Up and Drive” was undeniably muscular for late ’00s radio — perhaps a little too much so, as the song was the lone Good Girl Gone Bad single to miss the Hot 100’s top 10 — but it was still an efficient if sharp turn for RiRi, one ultimately used on a variety of movie soundtracks and even a 2010s Mazda commercial.

Overdrive: Hard to argue with the break squeal that punctuates the middle of Rih’s insistence of “Baby you got the keys… now, shut up and drive.” — A.U.

25. BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN, “RACING IN THE STREET”

Make and Model: From 1978’s Darkness on the Edge of Town, the favorite album among the most hardcore Springsteen fans, comes one of the saddest songs in The Boss’s canon full of small-town losers still looking to score — even though their fantasies are fading like an old paint job.

Fuel Economy: The majestic piano dirge details a car the narrator built “straight out of scratch,” which provides a sense of false bravado and separates him from guys he says “just give up living/ And start dying little by little, piece by piece.” But the third verse breaks through the facade as he sings about his girlfriend, her dreams shattered, who “stares off alone into the night/ With the eyes of one who hates for just being born.”

Overdrive: Even with a striking real-heads-only opening line like “I got a ’69 Chevy with a 396, fuelie heads and a Hurst on the floor,” you don’t have to know a thing about cars to recognize the broken-down characters. — M. Newman

24. DR. DRE, “LET ME RIDE”

Make and Model: No, this ain’t Aerosmith blasting from your radio on your ride to L.A.’s south side — it’s the motherf–kin’ D-R-E, in the midst of creating the G-Funk sound that would soon become the driving soundtrack for the entire mid-’90s.

Fuel Economy: While Dre is on his lonesome cruising from Greenleaf to Slauson in his “four with sixteen switches,” “Let Me Ride” is such a vivid and joyous four-wheel journey that by the end of the song, the rapper/producer’s got everybody singing along to the Parliament-swiped hook: “Swing down, sweet chariot, stop, and… let… me ride!

Overdrive: In the third verse, the MC unforgettably echoes the wide public anticipation that his audible presence “just up the street” caused back in 1992: “Is it Dre? Is it Dre?” — A.U.

23. CHARLI XCX, “VROOM VROOM”

Make and Model: Charli’s 2015 EP of the same name was no mere stopgap — it marked a turning point for the singer’s career, which always straddled the cusp of the mainstream and pop’s more daring fringes. With “Vroom Vroom” as her GPS and the PC Music crew as her co-navigators, she floored it for the latter — and never looked back.

Fuel Economy: “Vroom Vroom” sounds like a pop song not just about cars, but made by one: The late SOPHIE’s visionary production may as well have sampled the results of a crash-test site with all its scrape and bang sound effects. But just as SOPHIE often reveled in the tension between hard and soft sounds, Charli’s breezy, Y2K-era melodies on the pre-chorus are as plush as the seats of her lavender Lamborghini.

Overdrive: The track goes from zero to 100 as soon as that demon-gurgle bass line kicks in — easily the most lit moment of a Charli XCX show. — N.F.

22. THE MODERN LOVERS, “ROADRUNNER”

Make and Model: The Modern Lovers proto-punk classic was released in 1972, as an ode to blaring the radio on the open roads in Massachusetts, where frontman Jonathan Richman hails from. 

Fuel Economy: The song captures the romanticism of being alone on the highway (or just the side streets) with nothing but the power of the AM radio to keep you company, and also succeeds in its sincere and openly biased loved for Richman’s home state.  

Overdrive: When Richman boyishly sings “I’m in love with Massachusetts/ And the neon when it’s cold outside” in the song’s opening verse. — T.M.

21. MEAT LOAF, “PARADISE BY THE DASHBOARD LIGHT”

Make and Model: Name one thing more American than this Jim Steinman-penned ode to trying to score in the backseat from Loaf’s mega-platinum 1977 masterpiece Bat Out of Hell. The operatic nearly nine-minute ode to faking it until she lets you make it famously includes an absurd interlude by former New York Yankees shortstop/announcer Phil Rizzuto, narrating a paper-thinly veiled baseball-as-sex rev-up.

Fuel Economy: Steinman said his goal was to write the “ultimate car/sex song in which everything goes horribly wrong in the end.” His overheated ode to teenage backseat fumbling hits all the automotive sex switches: parking by the lake, the drone of the radio, and a young man who will do anything for love, including that.

Overdrive: The mix of flop sweat, desperation and out-of-control hormones reaches a peak with the chorus wails, “Though it’s cold and lonely in the deep dark night/ I can see paradise by the dashboard light.” — G.K.

20. KRAFTWERK, “AUTOBAHN”

Make and Model: It only sounds like “fun, fun, fun.” The lyrics to Kraftwerk’s first song with words — which became a surprise top 40 hit, reaching No. 25 on the Hot 100 in 1975 — are “fahr’n, fahr’n, fahr’n,” or driving, driving, driving. The music matches, steady as she goes: Can may have pioneered krautrock’s 4/4 motorik drumbeat, but Kraftwerk brought it to U.S. radio.

Fuel Economy: “Autobahn” isn’t about going anywhere but forward on a road that stretches out as a “graues Band” — a gray ribbon — through a sunlit valley. It’s an ode to sheer driving pleasure that thrums with synths as soothingly open and repetitive as the highway itself. Machinery never sounded so warm and inviting.

Overdrive: Toward the end of the song, “now we turn the radio on” — it sounds better in German — and the song that comes out of the speaker is “Wir fahr’n fahr’n far’n auf der Autobahn.” Essentially, “Autobahn” is a song about driving down the highway and listening to the radio play a song about driving down the highway and listening to the radio play a song about driving down the highway, and so on, until the road fades into the horizon. — R.L.

19. L’TRIMM, “CARS THAT GO BOOM”

Make and Model: Lady Tigra and Bunny D.’s song about guys with subwoofers hit the Billboard Hot 100 in 1988, but the playful hip-hop track found new life in 2020 when it went viral thanks to a TikTok push.

Fuel Economy: While plenty of songs focus on the drive itself, the Miami-based teens zeroed in on the sound system and the thrill of a booming bass, with equally exhilarating results. 

Overdrive: Tigra and Bunny trading lines intended to shame you for your car’s lack of boom: “So if your speaker’s weak/Then please turn it off/’Cause we like the cars/That sound so tough.” — C.W.

18. WAR, “LOW RIDER”

Make and Model: A clanking cowbell and spitting drum roll set the stage for the titular driver (or just the automobile itself?) — either way, a star in its own right, as singer Charles Miller claims: “All my friends know the low rider.”

Fuel Economy: Not even Sanford and/or Son had theme music this funky in the 1970s, as the Low Rider gets higher and drives slower to the sweet sounds of loping bass and chirping alto sax.

Overdrive: After cruising with the rest of the band for the first two and a half minutes, at the end of the song, the sax peels out with its own soaring solo, as the Low Rider no doubt disappears into the sunset. — A.U.

17. THE KING COLE TRIO, “(GET YOUR KICKS ON) ROUTE 66”

Make and Model: This souped-up 1946 hit was initially credited to The King Cole Trio, the jazz trio that featured the legendary Nat “King” Cole.

Fuel Economy: “Route 66” is pure Americana. It was released in the year following the end of World War II, when Americans were hungry to return to normalcy, and celebrates the highway that facilitated interstate travel. It’s a song that has likely inspired more road trips over the ensuing decades than any other.

Overdrive: The song names 10 stops on the route from Chicago to L.A., including Joplin, Missouri, and Flagstaff, Arizona — and don’t forget Winona, of course. It all could have come off as corny, but instead it adds to the song’s retro charm. — P.G.

16. CHAMILLIONAIRE FEAT. KRAYZIE BONE, “RIDIN”

Make and Model: The on-the-go, Play-N-Skillz-produced 2005 single about racial profiling from Chamillionaire’s debut studio album, The Sound of Revenge, led the Hot 100 for two weeks in 2006, won a Grammy and spawned a  fellow top-10 charting parody song from Weird “Al” Yankovic. 

Fuel Economy: Chamillionaire’s Southern hip-hop stylings on “Ridin’” just don’t hit the same way unless they’re bumping out of vibrating car speakers. Passenger Krayzie Bone provides the perfect gear shift with his rapid-fire lyricism halfway through, which serves as a nice change of pace from the “swang it slow” feel that permeates elsewhere in the song.

Overdrive: The only acceptable answer here is: “They see me rollin’, they hatin’/ Patrollin’ and tryna catch me riiiidin’ dirrrrtyyyy….”– J.G.

15. GARY NUMAN, “CARS”

Make and Model: Gary Numan‘s early synth-pop classic off 1979 debut album The Pleasure Principle remains relevant to this day for its take on technology — whether behind the wheel or a digital screen.

Fuel Economy: Numan‘s timeless hit encapsulates the false sense of security, loneliness, and dependency that modern technology — in this case, cars — can leave with users, and it accomplishes this feat in just four chilling-yet-catchy verses and essentially a one-word chorus.

Overdrive: Numan‘s isolation and need comes through the moment he turns the ignition: “Here in my car/ I feel safest of all/ I can lock all my doors/ It’s the only way to live/ In cars.” — A.C.

14. JANIS JOPLIN, “MERCEDES BENZ”

Make and Model: “Mercedes Benz” is rock icon Janis Joplin’s short, comical a cappella jab at car consumerism, recorded just days before her death in 1970. 

Fuel Economy: The song humorously asks the Lord to buy her a Mercedes Benz — because all her friends drive Porches and she deserves at least a Benz — delivered straight-faced in Joplin’s stunning, singular wail. 

Overdrive: Her plea to the Lord for her Mercedes hits home when she claims her new luxury vehicle will “make amends” for working hard all her lifetime, “no help from her friends.” — T.M.

13. WARREN G FEAT. NATE DOGG, “REGULATE”

Make and Model: A stone G-Funk classic from 1994, “Regulate” finds Nate Dogg and Mr. Warren G hitting the East Side of the LBC and finding more action than they bargained for — though still taking some “skirts” back to the motel for their troubles.

Fuel Economy: Riding a Michael McDonald groove and a Bob James whistle hook, Warren G’s three-act odyssey perfectly captures the danger and allure of a late-night cruise that finds more twists and turns than expected — with Nate Dogg navigating brilliantly in the passenger seat.

Overdrive: Nate Dogg quoting his Death Row label head via a pickup’s coy request: “She said, ‘My car’s broke down and you sing real nice, would ya…. let… me ride?’” — A.U.

12. EAGLES, “TAKE IT EASY”

Make and Model: “Take It Easy” absolutely soars with the joy of the open road. From those instantly recognizable, layered, opening guitar chords to the Eagles’ soaring harmonies throughout, this first single from the band’s 1972 debut album reached No. 12 on the Billboard Hot 100, and set the stage for the group’s decades of massive success to come.

Fuel Economy:  Written by Jackson Browne and Glenn Frey, “Take It Easy” contains one of pop music’s greatest philosophical statements wrapped in automotive imagery: “Don’t let the sound of your own wheels drive you crazy.”

Overdrive:  In one concise, partly yelped rhyme, the song offers a hitchhiker’s fantasy: “It’s a girl, my Lord in flatbed Ford/ slowing down to take a look at me.” And with that, the Eagles put Winslow, Arizona on the pop music map. — T.D.

11. OLIVIA RODRIGO, “DRIVERS LICENSE”

Make and Model: In case you’ve recently emerged from a cave, “Drivers License” is the hearts-and-records-breaking suburban ballad from Olivia Rodrigo that sped onto the scene at the top of the year and previewed the singer-songwriter’s rapturously received debut album, Sour.

Fuel Economy: Never before has there been such a sincere and emotive ode to a plastic ID card, as Rodrigo equates the freedom of being a teen able to drive with the less exciting flip side of being a teen able to have your world shattered by a breakup for the first time.

Overdrive: The song’s near-one-minute bridge, which begins with Rodrigo crooning, “Red lights, stop signs,” takes the song into near-warp speed, swelling with emotion before she admits one last time to herself in a whisper: “Now I drive alone past your street.” — L.H.

10. THE BEATLES, “DRIVE MY CAR”

Make and Model: The rare car song from the chauffeur’s perspective, this 1965 Fab Four gem sees narrator Paul McCartney enlisted for transport by a would-be starlet — though as she admits in the song’s third-verse twist, she doesn’t exactly have the wheels for him just yet. The driver’s a start, anyway.

Fuel Economy: Kicking off the original U.K. tracklist to The Beatles’ classic 1965 LP Rubber Soul, “Drive My Car” opens in third gear and keeps humming from there, a funny, breezy, rollicking good time for all, even as the actual driving never escapes the theoretical.

Overdrive: Sing it with us now, falsetto if you can: “BEEP BEEP, BEEP BEEP, YEAH!!” — A.U.

9. CHUCK BERRY, “NO PARTICULAR PLACE TO GO”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I3xlFMTZWnM

Make and Model: Chuck Berry’s 1964 rock’n’roll romp hits like a warm breeze while riding down the highway — at least until that modern machine foils his date by way of a pesky, unfastenable seatbelt. 

Fuel Economy: “No Particular Place to Go” is a snapshot of car culture in the 1960s, when autos were the ultimate social capital, played a part in the destination and — at least in this case — occasionally held the riders captive. 

Overdrive: Berry truly pulls the listener in when he swoons, “Cuddlin’ more and drivin’ slow/ With no particular place to go.” — T.M.

8. NELLY FEAT. CITY SPUD, “RIDE WIT ME” 

Make and Model: Though not officially released as a single in February 2001, this top-down anthem was a summertime hit for any driver who bought Nelly’s debut album, Country Grammar, when it dropped in June 2000.

Fuel Economy: A looped guitar part rides shotgun, keeping things light and lively, and with the song clocking in at nearly five minutes, “Ride Wit Me” provides just enough runway for you to shout “Must be the money!” exactly 17 times.

Overdrive: Nelly tipping his St. Louis Blues hat to one of the hottest cars at the time, the Range Rover HSE: “Watch me as I gas that 4 dot 6 Range/Watch the candy paint change every time I switch lanes.” — C.W.

7. JACKIE BRENSTON AND HIS DELTA CATS, “ROCKET 88”

Make and Model: Released in 1951 with rollicking piano, honking saxophone, fuzz-tone guitar, bluesy vocals and a driving beat, “Rocket 88” has widely been described as the first rock’n’roll song — and how fitting that a car song should have that honor! Credited to Jackie Brenston and his Delta Cats, the track was actually the creation of Ike Turner and his band the Kings of Rhythm, for whom Brenston sang lead and played sax.

Fuel Economy:  Brenston is said to have suggested the idea of the song to Turner, inspired by the Oldsmobile Rocket 88 full-sized sedan, which roared off a Detroit assembly line for the first time two years earlier.

Overdrive: Brentson’s voice glides gloriously over the word “jalopies” in Turner’s opening lyric as he laments “the noise they make” and proudly shows off “my new Rocket 88.”  When he sings the second verse — ”V-8 motor and this modern design/ black convertible top and the gals don’t mind” — no showroom salesman could do better. — T.D.

6. GOLDEN EARRING, “RADAR LOVE”

Make and Model: A bleary-eyed and fevered ’70s road rave-up from Dutch rockers Golden Earring, “Radar Love” is the greatest musical approximation of the last leg of a seemingly endless highway journey home — when the only thing even keeping you conscious is singing along to “some forgotten song” on the radio.

Fuel Economy: With a murmuring bass line and cymbal-heavy drum rhythm as hypnotic as the road passing under your wheels, the song almost dares you to stay focused as the blacktop in front of you stretches on into nothingness and your hands get wetter and wetter on the steering wheel — though at least that instantly iconic guitar lick snaps you back to attention a couple times a verse.

Overdrive: Hard to pick just one signature moment from a song filled to the brim with unforgettable lyrics and musical figures — and let’s not forget about that unexpectedly action-packed midsong breakdown either — but a relatable highlight comes after that instrumental section, when Barry Hay insists, “No more speed, I’m almost there,” and you can’t tell whether it’s actually the truth or just road delirium speaking. — A.U.

5. PRINCE, “LITTLE RED CORVETTE”

Make and Model: In April 1983, this sexy song became Prince’s first top 10 hit on the Hot 100, peaking at No. 6 the following month. By current, “WAP”-era standards, this song is PG, but at the time, it was considered racy for a major, multi-format hit.

Fuel Economy: It’s a car song, a sex song and a Saturday night song (“It was Saturday night/I get that makes it all right”). How could it miss?

Overdrive: Prince had built a reputation as someone who was sexually adventurous, so it was fun to see him meet his match and have to confess “I felt a little ill when I saw all the pictures of the jockeys that were there before me.” — P.G. 

4. EAZY-E, “BOYZ-N-THE-HOOD”

Make and Model: The gangsta rap classic originally released as Eazy-E’s 1987 debut single before — being remodeled as a track on N.W.A’s self-titled EP, “Boyz-n-the-Hood” — finds Eazy taking listeners out on a day in the life, detailing every stop in his 1964 Chevy Impala, which doesn’t even make it to the end of the song. 

Fuel Economy: Eazy casually cruises through a beautiful day in the neighborhood with the ease of Mr. Rogers, despite all the dangerous turns the song takes — from Kilo G’s grand theft auto conquest of an El Camino (which later lands him in the slammer) to Eazy’s recollection of shooting his old pal JD for trying to steal his car radio. Even the song’s origins are rooted in cars: Dr. Dre produced the song for Eazy as a favor after the latter bailed Dre out of jail for owing thousands of dollars in unpaid parking tickets for his Mazda RX7. 

Overdrive: The rapper’s way of tracking his ordinary journey in his 6-4, from cruising down the streets in it to pulling up to the spot “where my homeboys chill,” takes an unexpected turn as he wraps it around a telephone pole before the night’s end. Ultimately, he proves how disposable his prized possession was all along, as he sing-songs, ”I looked at my car and I said, ‘Oh brother’/ I throw it in the gutter, and go buy another.” — H.M.

3. THE BEACH BOYS, “I GET AROUND”

Make and Model: A classic cool-kids anthem from the summer of 1964, the Beach Boys proved that the Cali kids could still do youth culture bangers as well as those moptops from Liverpool, as the song topped the Hot 100 for two weeks at the very height of Beatlemania.

Fuel Economy: The Beach Boys had more explicit car odes than this adrenaline-pumped ode to West Coast cruising, but none that captured the timeless feeling of driving the strip on a Saturday night with your buddies and your best girl, feeling absolutely invincible because your car still hasn’t been beaten even once.

Overdrive: Just nothing like that gorgeously harmonized (but still entirely no-nonsense) “Get-around-round-round, I get around” refrain, making you want to pop the collar on your letterman jacket every single time. — A.U.

2. TRACY CHAPMAN, “FAST CAR” 

Make and Model: In this unlikely 1988 Hot 100 top 10 hit, Tracy Chapman tells the heart-rending folk-pop story of a woman escaping her bleak life in a fast car — only to drive right into yet another dreary reality.

Fuel Economy: The title vehicle serves as an escape plan, a bubble for the seemingly endless possibilities of romance and, finally, as a getaway car once more — but this time for her now-ex, as a fed-up Chapman delivers the devastating dismissal, “Take your fast car and keep on driving.”

Overdrive: Three storytelling verses backed by acoustic guitar all lead up to the moment when the chorus (and the drumbeat) finally kicks in: “So remember when we were driving/ Driving in your car….” — K.A.

1. BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN, “BORN TO RUN”

Make and Model: 46 years after its release “Born To Run” — the larger-than-life highway epic title track from Bruce Springsteen’s 1975 album — remains as classic as any Ford truck, Chevy muscle car or other quintessential American model.

Fuel Economy: While the lyrics may not explicitly say so, make no mistake, this song is about a race: between the “death trap, suicide rap” small town that will pound your dreams into workaday submission and the “chrome wheeled, fuel injected” car that might deliver you from this fate — if you’re brave enough to get behind the wheel and just drive away. In this way then, “Born To Run” is about the dichotomy of fate and destiny: between acquiescing to the life into which you were born, or instead choosing to believe that you were actually born to run, to take a chance, to break free, to get in the car, ride out of Freehold, New Jersey on Highway 9. And in doing so, to embody the fundamentally American ideal of taking hold of your freedom and future via the talismanic vehicle that might deliver you and Wendy somewhere better — even if that somewhere better is for now just a undetermined location miles down the highway.

Overdrive: The famous wall-of-sound structure to “Born” is especially pronounced in the climax, where Bruce preaches that he wants to die with Wendy “in an everlasting kiss” — before the E Street Band launches into a crescendo of drums, keys and guitars, which crashes and gives way to a resurgent Boss, protesting that while the “highway is jammed with broken heroes on a last-chance power drive,” his own quest will not be deterred by such gridlock. — K.B.

Источник: https://www.billboard.com/articles/news/list/9591317/greatest-car-songs-all-time-top-100/

Las Adidas Forum Low MM'S te van a derritir

adidas-Forum-Low

La marca sigue celebrando una de sus icónicas siluetas

Aparecida en los años 80 como una zapatilla con la que liderar el parqué, las Adidas Forum Low pronto se conviertieron en emblema del lifestyle y recientemente han tenido muchos highlights como la colaboración la cerveza Duff de Los Simpsons.

Sin embargo, hoy le vamos a poner mucho azúcar con la participación de los coloridos snacks que no se derriten nuca en tu mano, los M&M’s. Imaginamos que era tan difícil elegir entre toda la paleta de colores de los dulces para esta colaboración que Adidas ha decido hace hasta seis modelos.

mm-adidas-Forum-Lowadidas-Forum-LowMás Adidas Forum LowComprar Adidas Forum Duff en Foot Locker

El amarillo y el rojo seguramente son los dos colores más relacionados con la marca de snacks aunque en cada bolsa encontramos una paleta mucho más amplia y Adidas la ha plantado íntegramente en estas Adidas Forum Low. El blanco base tiene algo menos de protagonismo en el modelo amarillo pero gana más peso en el rojo, verde, azul y naranja.

Destacamos especialmente elementos que se repiten en cada silueta como la puntera agujereada en forma de M, la lengüeta amarilla, el sello M&M’s en la zona del talón o el revestimiento marrón en las zonas de tobillo y suela como guiño al delicioso chocolate.

M&M’s Adidas Forum Low nueva colaboración chocolatina snacks emanems amarillo rojo azul naranja nuevas Adidas Forum

adidas-Forum-Lowadidas-Forum-Lowadidas-Forum-LowVisitar Adidas.esAdidas Forum Duffman

La fecha de salida se mantiene como un misterio pero estamos seguros que todos los colores van a volar bien rápido, tanto o más que una bolsa de M&M’s en una sobremesa.

Источник: https://www.zapatillasysneakers.com/comment/3772

MEET YOUR NEW
BASS PLAYER.

Meet your new bass player

We are proud to introduce the market’s first bass software of its kind. One that goes above and beyond a traditional sample library to deliver not only pristine sound but also fundamental features that effortlessly let you to add bass to your songs.

TWO BASSES.

Two carefully sampled bass guitars
– one vintage and one modern.

SONGWRITING.

Arrange, compose, change and rearrange – without leaving the software.

MIDI.

Comes with bass MIDI for a broad
range of styles.

A BASS PLAYER.

Use drum or keyboard MIDI and have EZbass automatically create matching basslines.

GRID EDITOR.

Alter the performance or the subtler details of the MIDI using the built-in ‘Grid Editor.’

AUDIO TRACKER.

Audio to MIDI conversion based on the same technology found in Superior Drummer 3.

EZBASS – INTRODUCTION.

What is EZbass and how can it help you in your creative process?
Learn all that and more in this video.

Holiday Sales.

Holiday Sales.

Buy EZbass, get
a free MIDI pack
included.

Buy EZbass, get
a free MIDI pack
included.

1. Add EZbass
to your cart
2. Select your EZbass MIDI pack
3. Complete your purchase and…meet your new bass player!

Find full terms and conditions at the bottom of this page.

The concept of our EZ Line products has been clear since day one: to give you, the songwriter, not only products that make your music sound great, but also the tools you need in order to create music. Creativity is the hallmark at the front and center of the EZ Line design. EZbass, of course, is no different.

With EZbass, there are multiple ways of adding bass to an already written song.

Add Groove

Simply click the ‘Add Groove’ button to get a basic rhythm going.

Drums & Keys

Use the drum or keyboard MIDI in your song to have EZbass automatically create a matching bassline.

Tap2Find

Tap in the rhythm you want your bass to play using the ’Tap2Find’ feature and then have EZbass list all matching variations.

Audio Tracker

Use a previously recorded guitar, bass or rhythm performance and then have EZbass convert the audio to MIDI.

MIDI to audio

Perform the bassline yourself using a MIDI controller.

BASS

The ‘Bass’ view is the default screen that launches when you start the program. It gives you the visual representation of your selected instrument, a real-time display of the bass notes being played in your performance as well as access to the ‘Effects’ and ‘Tuning’ controls.

The ’Song Track’ is static regardless of which view you’re currently in but can of course be collapsed and hidden away completely. This is your MIDI hub for anything related to organizing the layout of your song or bass performance. From here, you can also access several fundamental features.

WATCH THE VIDEO.

Pointer, Pencil and Split tools

Pointer, Pencil and Split tools

Write, slice, dice and arrange.

Add Groove

Add Groove

Instantaneously add a groove of pumping eighth notes.

Add/Edit Chords

Add/Edit Chords

Add and/or change any highlighted chord(s).

Transition

Transition

Easily add seamless transitions and slides between chords.

Replace MIDI

Replace MIDI

Keep the chords in your selected block but replace the MIDI with what you select in the ’Grooves’ browser.

Edit Play Style

Edit Play Style

Change octave, velocity, damping, note length or the overall complexity of your rhythm using the ‘Amount’ knob.


Grooves tab
GROOVES

YOUR PERSONAL
BASS PLAYER.

At the heart of EZbass is the MIDI. It includes a wealth of different playing styles for all common genres and was designed to give you the broadest possible palette of options. Ultimately, you decide how the bass performs on your song. Of course, all included MIDI can be infinitely customized – without you having to leave the program.


Grid Editor tab
GRID EDITOR

REFINE YOUR BASSLINE.

Simply double-click a MIDI block in the ‘Song Track’ to enter the ‘Grid Editor.’ From there, you can alter articulations, adjust timing, fine-tune velocities, manually write parts and much more.


DRUMS & KEYS

LIKE MAGIC.

Have a drum or keyboard MIDI file that you need a matching bassline for? Just drag and drop it in EZbass and it will automatically create a matching performance. This is extremely powerful for getting a good starting point, quick and easy.


AUDIO TRACKER

TURN ANYTHING INTO A BASS.

The ‘Audio Tracker’ was designed to mainly handle monophonic guitar or bass audio, but it also has a deep understanding for rhythmic material. This means that you can use an already recorded guitar, bass or percussive performance, import it to EZbass and have it seamlessly ‘translate’ it to MIDI. You can even record your own audio, right inside EZbass!

EZbass includes two fundamentally different instruments, both picked to complement one another and paint the broadest possible sonic scope. Each bass was sampled with the same attention to detail and quality that has made Toontrack spearhead the drum sampling industry for 20 years and counting.

TWO BASSES.

Two fundamentally different instruments.

RICH DETAIL.

Sampled with painstaking detail and articulation options.

LOW TUNING.

Both basses go as low as A0.

The Modern bass

THE MODERN BASS.

The ‘Modern’ sound library features an Alembic* bass, a high-end American brand endorsed by many top players around the world. It was captured with both fingers, pick and slap options.

“When we started the EZbass project, we were looking for an instrument that could produce the most versatile and well-rounded tone possible,” comments Magnus Melkersson, EZbass lead R&D technician. “We scoured the market and tried dozens of basses before we finally landed on this one. I have played bass all my life and I have personally never come across an instrument more dynamic, expressive or full of life than this one. It truly is a beautiful instrument that embodies the entire frequency range you need in a bass. It was the perfect choice for the ‘Modern’ library.”

One thing that particularly sets this instrument apart from other basses is the pickups – single-coils with an active hum-cancelling coil mounted in between. This gives the instrument the tonal single-coil characteristics but leaves out any inherent noise. Both the bridge and neck pickups were sampled separately, allowing you to use each pickup separately or seamlessly blend between them. In other words, it’s literally like having two basses in one.

LISTEN.

*All other manufacturers’ product names are trademarks of their respective owners, which are in no way associated or affiliated with Toontrack. See full notice here.

The Vintage bass

THE VINTAGE BASS.

The ‘Vintage’ library features a classic Fender* Jazz bass, an instrument used across all genres since the 1960s and one that still to this day remains one of the world’s most iconic bass guitars.

“As a contrast to the ‘Modern’ bass, we wanted an instrument that was fundamentally different in all aspects – from tone, frequency range and pickups to overall feel,” says Ulf Edlund, one of the lead EZbass sound designers. “This bass has a completely different set of harmonics compared to the ‘Modern.’ Although it sits perfectly in any pop, rock or even metal track, it truly shines in any context that calls for something more mellow. I would pick this bass over anything else for a jazz, blues or country song.”

This bass was hot-wired to offer the same type of flexibility with the pickup options as the ‘Modern’ bass, meaning you can use each pickup separately or seamlessly blend between them.

LISTEN.

*All other manufacturers’ product names are trademarks of their respective owners, which are in no way associated or affiliated with Toontrack. See full notice here.

Articulations

ARTICULATIONS.

PICK, THUMP, SLAP, POP!

EZbass delivers the most all-encompassing set of articulations you need in order to produce stunningly real performances for anything from subtle jazz to extreme metal. The main tools of the ‘Modern’ bass include fingers, pick and slap while the ‘Vintage’ bass includes fingers and pick.

Presets

With EZbass, a great tone is merely a mouse slap away. The presets in EZbass cover a broad range of expertly crafted tones based on amp and cab simulation as well as on the same complex network of effects used behind the scenes in all EZ Line products.

TAKE CONTROL.

Fine-tune your bass tone with intuitive controls.

SUB-BASS

Two synthesized sine tones for each preset.

DIRECT IN.

Use the DI preset option to process externally.

GET IT AS PART OF A BUNDLE.

This bundle includes EZdrummer 2, EZbass, EZmix 2 and one EZkeys of your choice. Welcome to a world of sound and a songwriting experience that covers the entire range from drums and bass to keys and mixing/mastering.

EZ LINE SOFTWARE COLLECTION

Supported Hosts *

Ableton Live(version 9 or above)
Cakewalk(version 2018 or above)
Cubase(version 6 or above)
Digital Performer(version 9 or above)
GarageBand(version 10 or above)
Logic Pro(version 9 or above)
Pro Tools(version 12 or above)
REAPER(version 6 or above)
Studio One Artist(version 5 or above)
Studio One Professional(version 2 or above)
Waveform(version 10 or above)

* The list consists of hosts where the main features of our software work. There might be cases where features like drag & drop of MIDI, multi-channel-out, MIDI channel filtering or other non-critical features do not work. If unsure, we recommend that you investigate with the respective manufacturer what limitations may exist in their environment. If your host is not listed it means that we have not tested it. It may still work but a prerequisite is that the host supports VST2, AU or AAX instruments.

SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS.

5 GB of free hard disk space.

64-bit Windows 7 or newer, 4 GB RAM (8 GB RAM or more recommended).

macOS 10.10 or higher, Intel or Apple silicon processor, 4 GB RAM (8 GB RAM or more recommended).
64-bit host (with support for VST, VST3, AU or AAX). Standalone is included.

Источник: https://www.toontrack.com/product/ezbass/

Sonic Forces - Running Battle

Sonic the Hedgehog is back and running in this fast and cool multiplayer racing & battle game from SEGA! Run, race and compete in multiplayer running games with real players from around the world for a true multiplayer experience! Beat other players to become the multiplayer racing game champion!

Race as Sonic the Hedgehog, Knuckles, Shadow and other Sonic heroes! Play in multiplayer racing games with players from around the world as you battle through epic Sonic worlds. Run, dodge and attack as you race & battle other racers in this fast, fun, free multiplayer running game featuring Sonic the Hedgehog. Download and start your battle run NOW!

Race and battle through a world destroyed by Dr. Eggman and a powerful new villain in Sonic Forces, the new fast-paced action racing game from the team that brought you Sonic Colors and Sonic Generations.

RUN, RACE AND WIN MULTIPLAYER GAMES!
- Run fast to win in epic multiplayer adventure battles and races!
- Spin, jump, smash and slide as your race your way to victory with Sonic!
- Complete multiplayer races to win trophies to unlock a variety of new and challenging tracks to run, race and play on
- Join epic running and racing games with Sonic and his friends, dash to victory!

PLAY RACING GAMES WITH SONIC & FRIENDS
- Race as Sonic, Amy, Tails, Knuckles, Shadow, Rouge, and more awesome Sonic heroes
- Battle for Rings in every race to upgrade your runners and improve their racing skills
- Run & race to the top of the PvP multiplayer racing leaderboards and become the best racer

If you love Classic Sonic and Classic SEGA games, you will love playing Sonic Forces! Start running with Sonic the Hedgehog, Tails, Amy, Knuckles and more Sonic heroes as you race as fast as you can in this speedy multiplayer runner game of epic proportions!

Privacy Policy: http://www.sega.com/mprivacy
Terms of Use: http://www.sega.com/Mobile_EULA

SEGA games apps are ad-supported and no in-app purchases are required to progress; ad-free play option available with in-app purchase.

Other than for users known to be under 13, this game may include "Interest Based Ads" (please see http://www.sega.com/mprivacy#3IBADiscolure for more information) and may collect "Precise Location Data" (please see http://www.sega.com/mprivacy#5LocationDataDisclosure for more information)

The following permissions are required for downloading additional game files: READ_EXTERNAL_STORAGE & WRITE_EXTERNAL_STORAGE

© SEGA All rights reserved. SEGA, the SEGA logo, SONIC THE HEDGEHOG and SONIC FORCES: SPEED BATTLE are registered trademarks or trademarks of SEGA Holdings Co., Ltd. or its affiliates.

Источник: https://play.google.com/

“Y’all Don’t Love Us?! How The ’95 Source Awards Showed The Importance Of Receiving Accolades In Rap

Majic 94.5 Featured Video

CLOSE

Where were you during the 1995 Source Awards?

Some were barely even born, while others hadn’t even been thought of being conceived yet. However, for the handful of hip-hop heads that can recall either witnessing the event on TV or actually being in the Paramount Theater in Madison Square Garden on that iconic night in August 1995, they’ll be quick to tell you how iconic the night was for the genre in general and future rap award shows that would follow.

As we continue to celebrate Hip-Hop History Month for all of November, we’re taking a moment to look back on a night that changed hip-hop forever and how we look at the importance of awarding rappers with the accolades they deserve.

 

Not even 20 minutes into the show, Southern-based rap dup Outkast set the tone for the night after they won for “New Artist of the Year, Group.” During a time in hip-hop when the now-infamous East Coast/West Coast rap war was reaching its peak, many overlooked what was coming out of the South altogether and it was made apparent when Andre 3000 and Big Boi were literally booed as they went to the stage to accept the award. However, 3Stacks’ classic acceptance speech turned that all around when he simply and boldly closed his speech by stating, “The South got something to say!” It was the first major award the duo received in their career, but certainly wouldn’t be the last; 6 GRAMMYs, 6 BET Awards, 5 VMAs and 4 AMAs later just to name a few, and we still look at these guys as the September 3, 2021 - Free Activators they fought so hard to become.

However, it all started with that first award received at The 1995 Source Awards that set everything into motion, which is the key point in understanding why it’s so important to give our hip-hop heroes their flowers while they can still smell them.

That sentiment would become even more apparent that night when it came to The Notorious B.I.G.

 

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Biggie was truly the star of the night at the ’95 Source Awards, both in accolades and attention alike. Winning for “New Artist of the Year, Solo,” “Album of VyprVPN 4.2.2 Crack + Serial Key 2021 - Free Activators Year” for his classic 1994 debut LP, Ready To Die, “Lyricist of the Year” and “Live Performer of the Year, or as he comically put it during the press conference, “The One That Be Rockin’ The Shows The Best,” Biggie proved his dominance in the game that night. Much like Outkast, it was the first set of awards Biggie would receive in his short-lived career that tragically ended just over a year and half after this night when he was killed in a still-unsolved drive-by shooting on March 9, 1997. His induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2020 is a testament that B.I.G. would’ve gone on to continue racking up awards if fate had given us more time with the undisputed King of New York Rap.

You can tell by his performance that night how much The Notorious B.I.G. was loved, respected and had left to share with the world.

 

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As dominant as Biggie was at the ’95 Source Awards, it was the all-stars of West Coast rap that truly made the night unforgettable for both good and bad reasons. From Snoop Dogg receiving “Artist of the Year, Solo” and “Video of the Year” for his epic 1994 short film “Murder Was The Case” to Dr. Dre accepting “Producer of the Year,” Ice Cube winning for “Best Acting Performance” in John Singleton’s classic 1995 film, Higher Learning, and the late Eazy-E rightfully being honored with the night’s prestigious “Lifetime Achievement Award” after dying just under 5 months prior to the ceremony, you can say that the West Coast was represented right as well.

However, it was Suge Knight’s unforgettable speech while accepting the “Soundtrack of the Year” award as executive producer of the Above The Rim soundtrack that would set off a rapture of events and truly ignite the East Coast/West Coast beef.

 

On the flip side of rightfully awarding those who deserve it, there’s something to be said about honoring those who have more nefarious intentions. The soundtrack itself deserved the recognition — 2x platinum certification, #1 on Billboard’s Hip-Hop Albums chart and a chart-topping single with Nate Dogg & Warren G’s “Regulate” are definitely award-worthy accomplishments  — but Suge took the moment and created an energy that would translate from the studio to the streets. Many believe that both Biggie and the late West Coast icon 2Pac, who died eerily similar to B.I.G. a little over a year after the awards aired, would still be alive if it weren’t for the perpetuated beef that pit them against each other. Award shows give a platform for people to speak their piece, and unfortunately this may have been a moment when it backfired at the expense of losing two legends in the game.

With that said though, Suge did ignite a fire in Snoop Dogg that gave us the classic “Y’all don’t love us?!” moment while Dre accepted producer of the year, which actually sums up the point of showing love in the first place.

 

Overall, there would be no Hip-Hop History Month without award ceremonies like the ’95 Source Awards. Although The Source Magazine doesn’t produce it anymore, with BET’s annual Hip-Hop Awards being the only one still solely dedicated to giving rappers their respect, we’ll always have love for the events of that night, the superstars that made it iconic and those we’ve lost in the game since then.

Relive that unforgettable night of the 1995 Source Awards in its entirety below:

 

 

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Hip-Hop History Month

Hip-Hop History Month: Celebrating 48 Years Of The Culture

21 photosLaunch gallery

Hip-Hop History Month: Celebrating 48 Years Of The Culture

1. DJ Kool Herc

DJ Kool Herc, Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 1 of 21

2. Big Daddy Kane

Big Daddy Kane Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 2 of 21

3. KRS-1

KRS 1 Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 3 of 21

4. Queen Latifah

Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 4 of 21

5. A Tribe Called Quest

A Tribe Called Quest Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 5 of 21

6. Hip-Hop History Month: LL Cool J

Hip-Hop History Month: LL Cool J Source:Reach Media 6 of photoshop 2019 crack reddit - Free Activators 7. Eazy E Eazy EHip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 7 of 21

8. 2 Pac and The Notorious B.I.G.

2Pac Big Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 8 of 21

9. Jay-Z

Jay-Z Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 9 of 21

10. Outkast

Outkast Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 10 of 21

11. Nas

Nas Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 11 of 21

12. Lauryn Hill

Lauryn Hill Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 12 of 21

13. Lil Wayne

Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 13 of 21

14. DMX

DMX Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 14 of 21

15. Meek Mill

Meek Mill Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 15 of 21

16. Drake

Drake Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 16 of 21

17. Kendrick Lamar

Kendrick Lamar Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 17 of 21

18. Megan Thee Stallion

Megan Thee Stallion Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 18 of 21

19. Hip-Hop History Month: Lil Baby

Hip-Hop History Month: Lil Baby Source:Radio One Digital 19 of 21

20. J. Cole

J Cole Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 20 of 21

21. Nipsey Hussle

Nipsey Hussle Hip-Hop History Month Cards Source:Radio One Digital 21 of 21

“Y’all Don’t Love Us?! How The ’95 Source Awards Showed The Importance Of Receiving Accolades In Rap  was originally published on blackamericaweb.com

Источник: https://majic945.com/268957/yall-dont-love-us-how-the-95-source-awards-showed-the-importance-of-receiving-accolades-in-rap/

Sonic Forces - Running Battle

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The
Music
Issue
2019

Introduction

By Nitsuh Abebe

It usually takes a while — a decade or two — before we can look back at a particular era of American life and see it as something coherent, something whose every aspect is marked by one overarching mood. It takes a certain amount of hindsight to notice how all the wildly different reactions people had to the moment were still, in the end, reactions to the same thing; all the different poses they adopted were still being struck against the same backdrop.

But this era — this year, and the last one, and one or two before that — might be an exception. There’s an oddly strong in-the-moment consensus on how everyone is feeling these days, and it Bitdefender Total Security 2018 Build 23.0.8.17 Crack - Free Activators not good. At some point it became a routine conversational tic for all sorts of people, of all sorts of persuasions, to express, with an incredulous gesture, that things feel a bit grueling and frantic lately, don’t they? Musicians are no exception. “Life is pretty tumultuous right now for all of us,” said the crossover country star Kacey Musgraves, while accepting a Grammy for the Album of the Year. The Swedish singer Robyn acknowledges that “pop at the moment is depressing” in an interview midway through this issue. “The music kids are listening to is heavy! Maybe it’s hard to be positive and optimistic at the moment.”

What’s amazing is that the musical expression of all this isn’t always some big swing toward darkness, or anger, or anxiety. (Though there is, in certain genres, plenty of all that as well.) Read through this list, and what you’ll often see instead is a very earnest, very serious desire to find the right reaction to a world that feels tense and high-stakes — an ambient conviction that music should be looking for ways to cope, ways to protect ourselves, moments of escape, hard reckonings with our collective responsibilities, ideas for how to make the world feel less brutal. The 25 songs and artists below include blockbuster hits, critical darlings and inescapable conversation pieces, but few of them take a direct route to the usual joys of pop — the songs about dancing and boasting and sex and love, the ones about what a fantastic night everyone’s about to have or what ecstasies they intend to find by the end of it. No, a lot of these songs seem focused on deeper challenges: How do we get to those joys in the first place? Who gets to have them, and who deserves them? And in one case: Which of them are worth the corresponding rise in sea levels?

The artists do not always sound thrilled about the circumstances. (“The society we live in at the moment,” Robyn says — “we didn’t really make it very good, you know?”) But they’re a lot more motivated — whether it’s to articulate something bleak or find their way toward something better — than you might expect.

Nitsuh Abebe is a story editor for the magazine.

Photo illustration source photographs: Rosalía: Christian Bertrand/Alamy. The 1975: Dafydd Owen/Newscom. Davidson: John Londono/Ninja Tune. All other source photographs: Getty Images.

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I don’t know if Bruce Springsteen thinks about death as much as I think about the inevitability of his dying. I’ve lived an entire life as a fan of Bruce Springsteen, which means I have already imagined the world without him in it, and I have mourned that world. If you’re lucky enough to age gracefully beyond a certain point, with that aging will come an acceptance of finality or of the idea that there is going to be a darkness from which you can’t return. If you’re lucky enough to have made a life writing songs or stories or something at the intersection of songs and stories, this could mean that there comes a point where you make sure people hear you clearly, one last time, before you go.

I don’t know if Springsteen himself thinks about his life and death in this way, but the silences in “Springsteen on Broadway” — which ran on Broadway from Oct. 3, 2017, to Dec. 15, 2018, culminating in a soundtrack and a Netflix special — suggest he might. The spaces he built in between the songs allow the artist to explain and give context not to just the music but also to the life built around manycam pro download music. If the project of Springsteen’s Broadway show was to attach histories and legacies to the individual songs long adored by the public, there is also something to be said about what time does to natural storytellers. They can become more tactile with age, drawing out stories that have been told several times before the most current retelling — leaving a listener with even more touchable moments than otherwise might have been asked for or sought, so that when the storyteller is long gone, there might still be fragments of his or her stories that span generations.

Of the many gripping examples of this in “Springsteen on Broadway,” the one that stands out most memorably is the sprawling story he tells before playing his iconic (and often misconstrued song) “Born in the U.S.A.” The story centers on Walter Cichon, who was the frontman for the Motifs, a band Springsteen still considers one of the best rock ’n’ roll bands from the Jersey Shore. In the ’60s, the Motifs played weekend shows to rooms packed with teenage admirers. Cichon wore his hair long and sported pointy black boots. When he performed, he would shake out his hair and send beads of sweat flying past the stage lights. For anyone who has ever lived in any town where a band was on the verge of “making it,” you know the epiphany: This band is too good to be here, in this place, in this moment. That was the Motifs, with their frantic and warbly guitars laid below Cichon’s howling vocals.

Walter Cichon was drafted when he was 21 and didn’t come back from Vietnam. He went missing in action in 1968.

On Broadway, Bruce Springsteen performs “Born in the U.S.A.” largely in silence. The song is half-spoken, half-sung, Springsteen’s voice rough and breaking beneath the decades of labor it has done — labor rendered romantic through writing and performance. What has always been true about the career of Bruce Springsteen is that he’s most entertaining when backed by his pals, but he’s most earnest when he’s alone. To hear “Born in the U.S.A.” presented without an instrument is to hear the strain that pushes toward the edge of anger, that hovering sentiment that was lost in the original’s bombastic wall of sound and perhaps camouflaged by its imagery. At the time of the song’s release, Springsteen was a young, attractive, muscular man who appeared midjump in front of an American flag on the single’s cover. From a zoomed-out perspective — a white musician writing about the intricacies of labor — it could seem as if he represented everything that a particular America would be proud of. The misreading of the original song was not purely accidental: Its volume and fanfare meant that it sounded (and still sounds) good bursting out of speakers while fireworks explode in the sky, and its loudest words in the chorus are about land and birthright. But video converter ultimate download crack the drums and bursts of keyboards gone, the relentlessly hollow hope of the song is gone, too. On the isolated stage of a theater, all that’s left is knowing that the singer has loved and dreamed and lost in a country sometimes not worth loving and dreaming and losing in.

In his long monologue introducing “Born in the U.S.A.” on Broadway, Springsteen talks about “the blood and the confusion and the pride and the shame and the grace that comes with birthplace,” and I get it. There are some of us who didn’t ask to be born in our particular here, and there are some of us who didn’t ask to come to this particular here, but to be in wherever your here is means that you might be compelled to both fight for it and forgive it. On Broadway, Springsteen mentions something else: He tells the story of him and two of his friends being summoned to the selective-service office, as a prelude to Wavebox 4.9.0 Full Version - Crack Key For U sent to Vietnam — for what, he says, “we were sure was going to be our funeral.” They did everything they could to get out of being drafted, and succeeded. He ends the story by exhaling softly and pausing before telling the audience: “I do sometimes wonder who went in my place. Because somebody did.”

I imagine that’s it. To live a long enough life in a place founded, in part, on violence and volatility is to know that long life may depend on someone else walking through a door you wanted no part of. Or to know that the heroes from your hometown never made it out because war got to them first. Stripped to its barest bones, “Born in the U.S.A.” asks a listener to recognize that human survival is not something we can count on. The song matters now in a different way than it did in 1984, largely because of the artist behind it: Springsteen, trying to wrestle not only with the song’s current legacy but also with how it might be co-opted decades from now, when he won’t be around to make sure people understand the ache behind the song’s fury.

Hanif Abdurraqib is a poet, an essayist and a cultural critic in Columbus, Ohio.

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‘Thank u, next” is styled like a tweet, which is how the phrase first appeared — as a cryptic rebuke that Ariana Avast Premier License File 20.9.2437 + License Key Free Download 2021 thumbed off in the comedian Pete Davidson’s general direction a few days after their breakup. Since then, the phrase has pulsed through the culture, undulating between naughty and nice. When the song debuted, it was revealed to be not a takedown but instead a sincere tribute to relationships past, lifting Davidson (“for Pete, I’m so thankful”) to the same plane as her ex Mac Miller, the rapper who died of a drug overdose last year (“he was an angel”). But then the video hit, and in it, Grande cosplayed as Regina George, the demon Barbie of “Mean Girls,” scrawling notes about her exes in a burn book. But then all the things she wrote about them were really nice! A quick shot in the video shows the apology she scrawled on Davidson’s page — “sry i dipped” — which was secretly the most savage note of all: For the record, she dumped him.

Online, the phrase has bloomed into a deliciously ambiguous kiss-off, a usage modeled by Grande herself, directed toward anyone from a no-name rapper who covered the song to Piers Morgan, who criticized pop stars for appearing in revealing photo shoots. Like the Southern “bless your heart,” the passive-aggressive niceties that sustain the entire Midwest or the chill of the British stiff upper lip, the internet has found a discreet slight of its own in “thank u, next.”

The phrase is breezily transactional. It renders news anchors and ex-boyfriends into strangers, reducing them to the base level of politeness required by the social contract. It sharpens respect into a shiv. And yet it is vexing in its restraint, pre-emptively silencing any retaliatory efforts.

We are living in a time of great pettiness. A big star can grow two sizes by doing something very small. Bhad Bhabie chucked a drink at Iggy Azalea and cemented her status as a memetic folk hero. Pusha T lobbed a literal baby into the middle of his rap war with Drake. Grande’s grace could, in one reading, signal a rejection of all of this calculated cruelty, a classy subversion of the fan-and-industry expectation that a celebrity may only rise by tearing another down.

But it’s also a savvy strategy for advancing the game. The next level of beef is always the high road — ascending to that rarefied realm of conflict where put-downs are joined seamlessly with self-respect. In “thank u, next,” Grande casts her exes as steppingstones on her path to greatness, men who taught her “patience,” “pain” and, ultimately, how little she needed them. There’s nothing harsher than having your relationship converted into a learning experience. And the worst part is, you know she’s right. The secret message of “thank u, next” is that women can dismiss men who sap their energies and undermine their success, and this is not an act of cruelty or a symptom of bitchiness. It’s a simple social nicety.

Amanda Hess is a critic at large for The Times. She writes about internet culture for the Arts section.

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From the vocal singularity embodied in Aretha Franklin to the otherworldly dance moves of Privacy Drive Crack Jackson, black folks have long expected rigor from our R.&B. entertainers. (We institutionalized this expectation at the Apollo Theater, where, on Amateur Night, an “executioner” used to chase away mediocre performers midact with a broom or a pitchfork; now he just dances them off the stage.) Being the best in R.&B. meant that you had a honed, real-deal ability to entertain, that you could stand on a stage and perform a remarkable act that separated you from the rest of us.

I grew up hearing debates about the worthiness of this or that singer devolve into shouting matches, the assertion RecordPad Sound Recorder Crack a favored artist could sing but not really sang being an affront to your system of taste and judgment. Mariah Carey was always an easy win. In a single verse, her melismatic contralto might argue with her teasing falsetto, alternating between lower and higher notes until she sounded more bird than human. In the ’90s, girl-next-door Mariah belted out uptempo love songs on one station; a few turns of the dial over, she sang the same record with the addition of a hip-hop verse, thereby sliding from mainstream to “urban,” which is to say from white to black. She straddled two coded worlds as a biracial person, a sometimes-fraught experience that she addressed on her 1997 song “Outside.”

Her desire for cross-genre acceptance is part of what pushed her to write and arrange songs for herself that few other human beings could cover. Through the mid-2000s, to listen to a Mariah album, from lead single to deep cut, was to marvel at a maximalist pulling off her excesses, every run more dazzling than the last. And yet by the end of the aughts, she had begun receding behind her production, talk-singing and whispering where she used to overaccentuate each phrase. The rumored loss of her voice seemed to mark the end of an era altogether.

Few people argue over the voice of a singer the way they used to, but R.&B. is back in vogue after having spent several years in the background as E.D.M. dictated pop’s music imperatives. Younger artists are pushing the genre forward in many respects: intriguing, pared-down personal style (SZA); forceful, nuanced messaging (Solange); swaggering vocals that don’t feel yoked to the rap feature (H.E.R.); and a much-needed expansion of whom a woman avast premier 2019 license file till 2050 - Free Activators be singing love songs to in the first place (Syd). But the terms by which we expect rigor from these artists have changed, too. A sandboxie 5.31 2 crack - Activators Patch that sounds as though it were gifted from the heavens is no longer a likely predictor of critical success, though it may garner you a stint on “The Voice.” More important is appearing unvarnished, or idiosyncratic. Contemporary R.&B. seems to prefer the D.I.Y. ethos of indie rock or riffing on the earthy, unadorned feel of neo-soul. The preferred feel is that of a raw outpouring of emotion alone in a bedroom with a laptop. To see R.&B.’s newest names perform at events like the Grammys is a bit like seeing your high school gym teacher on a date — who even knew they owned fancy clothes?

Mariah Carey doesn’t seem built for this new R.&B. moment, but “A No No,” from her 2018 album “Caution,” works for all the reasons we would once expect it not to. It’s a straightforward sample of an extremely familiar song (a remix of Lil’ Kim’s 1997 “Crush on You”). Vocally, it’s uncomplicated. The track has a few elastic moments at the top of verses, but for the most part, Carey maintains a syncopated, crooning sing-speak. She comes down from the vocal stratosphere to some place closer to the younger R.&B. chanteuses, but it never feels like a cop-out. “Caution” as a whole forgoes Carey’s hallmark vocal pyrotechnics, save for a few whistle tones that creep into the final notes of several tracks. What makes it different from her previous attempts at less ornate vocal arrangement is the confidence Carey exudes. She isn’t hiding; she’s recalibrating.

This new phase of R.&B. is one for which Mariah the songwriter is well suited. She has always been a quick study of current trends, and as a writer on 17 of her 18 No.1 singles, she proved that she knew how to make her voice fit within them. Carey possesses a mischievous sense of humor (best employed on Eminem diss tracks) that is fit for our current age of trolling and lyrics made for memes. In “A No No” she drawls out the line “Irregardless of what transpired,” daring the listener to think too hard about whether she knows that she has deployed a fake word (of course she does). Over the past three decades, Mariah the vocalist has been so singular that other Mariahs went overlooked — the canny recognizer of trends, the pop star who pushed her label to make unlikely hip-hop collaborations happen and the songwriter who was funnier than people understood. Mariah, queen of glitter and lover of glamour, might never pull off a down-to-earth visual aesthetic, but she still possesses the tools to make music that embodies that feeling — and she has had these tools for years.

Angela Flournoy is turbo virtual machine executable - Free Activators author of “The Turner House.”

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Last year, in a span of months, Meek Mill went from solitary confinement in a Pennsylvania prison to releasing an album that debuted at No.1 on the Billboard chart. It’s a paradoxical narrative that has defined the Philadelphia rapper since his teenage years, when he landed both a record deal and criminal convictions on drug and gun charges. Sentenced at 21 to prison and years of probation, the 31-year-old rapper has spent his entire adult life in and out of courts and prison, often for noncriminal violations like not adequately reporting his travel plans.

But 2018 proved transformative. New scrutiny of the judge overseeing his probation, and of the initial case — he has always maintained that the police made up charges — roused public support from powerful people, including Jay-Z, Philadelphia’s district attorney and the Philadelphia 76ers co-owner Michael Rubin. With tour dates for his “Championships” album selling out, Mill has become a leading voice on the failings of the criminal-justice system. Along with writing an op-ed for The New York Times and appearing on national news shows, the rapper helped start the Reform Alliance, an organization dedicated to getting one million Americans out of the prison system.

How long did you work on the album? Probably eight months. Since I came out.

I usually take about eight months to produce a piece as well. Then there’s panic — you’ve gone over it so many times, you can’t even tell anymore if it’s good or not. I feel the same way. Going through the music so much, not even knowing if it’s good anymore — I done heard it at least a thousand times, trying to analyze and look at it so many ways.

At the end of “Championships,” you say we had to beat the streets, beat racism, beat poverty. So much of what you write is sociological, a study of the neighborhood. Your being from Philadelphia made me think about W.E.B. Du Bois in 1899 — he did a study called “The Philadelphia Negro.” Yeah, I read pieces of it in prison. One of the older guys probably gave it to me.

Then you know what I’m talking about. This was known as the first sociological study of black Americans in the country. He was trying to understand why black folks lived the way they lived. And the social problems he identified — poverty, crime, illiteracy, white discrimination — are the exact same things you talk about 120 years later. That was my life coming up, so it was normal. I always tell people, I’ve been living the life I’m living now for the last eight years, but I’ve been living in the ghetto for 23. Things we’ve been traumatized by our whole lives — we have a right to talk about it.

You refer to school a couple of times on this album — your mom praying you’d go to Yale, or going to a school with bullet holes in the lockers. You said you were on the honor roll? I used to be, until, like, third grade. There was another book I got in prison, about black kids — the fourth grade, things go wrong and grades start to decline. That was my life. Mine was because I moved to a different neighborhood, rougher than the one I came from.

One of my favorite quotes from James Baldwin is “The kids had been told that they weren’t worth [expletive], and everything they saw around them proved it.” What did your schools say about what society thought of you? We used to have teachers say, “Oh, you’re probably going to be dead or in jail, or you’re probably going to be a failure.” I had some good teachers, too, but it was rough in our schools.

I feel like that’s a message we start telling black boys very early: You’re going to be dead or in jail. I know we’re trying to warn them, but it also seems as if you’re dictating their future. Yeah, but I never believed that. I used to say I was going to be a normal story of the ghetto. But if you have your mom telling you you’re going to be a great person and then your teachers talk to you like that — you wouldn’t really want to listen to that person anymore.

Was school easy for you? Pretty easy. I didn’t have to study to pass my tests. Even if I ran the hallways, I would still be fairly good. Later on, when I really stopped trying, I was put in disciplinary schools. It was like a jail. You get strip-searched before you go in, fingerprinted every day. One day I just climbed over the gate and left.

It was a public school organized like a jail? In other words, it was early conditioning for what everybody assumed your future was going to be. When I finally went to jail, I already knew everybody. Everybody I went to school with was in the jail.

What were you put in that school for? Fighting and acting up. I said in one of my raps, I was acting up in school because I thought it was cool, but really I was hurt. Your mom’s at work, your dad’s in the graveyard, you’re not really getting nurtured, and I guess you just resort to acting up.

You have a song called “Trauma,” which talks about that, the PTSD young people in these neighborhoods are dealing with. But that’s why I love that Baldwin quote — everything about the environment tells these kids they’re nothing, right? But when they react in what’s actually a very normal way, we want to break them down. You don’t value yourself because you grow up not being valued. What type of motivation do you get if your mom is on drugs? Your self-esteem is automatically just low. Some people have the determination to shoot to the top. But, you know, that’s not normal — for just a regular kid to have the determination to do that.

I always say anger is an easier emotion to deal with than pain. Yeah. That’s why I say, you come through neighborhoods and you see kids with their faces all balled up or looking angry? They’re probably really angry. His mom is probably really on drugs, and he probably really don’t have food in netbalancer 9.12.4 crack - Free Activators house, and his dad is probably really dead. They hurt, they torn, they scarred. It’s nothing that words can really fix. “Why is this kid always angry?” Well, he’s been through something.

Who’s the first black writer you ever read? I’d never be able a real player named eazy a real player - Crack Key For U determine who was black and white when I was reading back then. I don’t know the first. “The New Jim Crow” — that’s a black writer?

Yes. Michelle Alexander. When you were in high school, you weren’t exposed to black literature, black writers? I went to public school. The books were falling apart. They probably still got the same books from when I was in school. We didn’t get no black literature in public school.

I read a lot as a child, mostly because I was grounded all the time. Then we had a black-studies course in high school, and I became obsessed with black history because it felt like, for the first time, the world made sense. You would see your community and how people lived, and they would tell you we just did not want better. But I could see how hard people worked, and they still DeskSoft SmartCapture Patch not get ahead. Studying history calmed me. The most I ever read was in prison. There’s nothing to do, so you turn to books. Reading made me process the system. Sometimes I thought it was just millions of black people, and Spanish — when you come to prison, it’s black and Spanish. Looking deeper, and seeing the way some of those things are broken down in “The New Jim Crow,” it made me really wonder. Because I am already a conspiracy theorist.

I don’t understand how you can be black and not be a conspiracy theorist. I was doing a show on CNN, and a guy was like, “Why are you saying the system is similar to slavery?” It kind of caught me off guard, and I couldn’t really answer. But you’ve got people working for eight cents in here. You’re feeding people the [expletive] you would feed slaves. You’ve got people cuffed up, shackled from top to bottom. People locked in the basement for 23 hours a day, being beat by the officers. It’s basically the same. And one of the amendments says that when you’re under custody of the government, you can be treated like a slave.

Yes, the 13th. So you were first arrested — for the original charge — at 19? My first arrest was actually going to school. In sixth or seventh grade. I was suspended, and I didn’t want to tell my mom, so I tried to hang out in the hallways. I got caught and went to jail for trespassing. My mom had to come get me.

What’s the charge you’re still on probation for? Selling crack. This is cleanmymac x activation number txt - Crack Key For U my dad’s soul: I wasn’t selling crack when they locked me up for it. When I got back, I had to get back in the street and start really selling weed to get me a lawyer, because everyone who had a public defender got crucified. My mug shot has my face swollen, both sides of my face beat up. I was charged with fracturing the cop’s hand. You know how his hand got fractured?

Yeah, punching you. Yeah. He charged me for him punching my face. They said I pointed a gun at them. If somebody can sit there and tell you the story of how they didn’t point a gun at cops, nine times out of 10, it’s true. It’s not too many people who can make it out of pointing a gun at a couple cops.

I remember one time, this judge said, “I don’t give people three to six months; I give people three to six years” — for something like a first-time weed charge. That always stuck with me. That’s not O.K. I mean, you can’t shoot nobody and expect to be getting chances. But if you were on probation and began smoking weed? People in the ’hood are going through real [expletive]. I barely sleep from so much trauma. Sometimes you just want to smoke and go to sleep.

And you’ve got to think about it — you’ve got 18- 19-year-old kids, sending them to a whole building full of rapists, killers. They put you in a cell with a 45-year-old man who got a life sentence, who’s a killer. This is your dad right here. He’s going to raise you. He’s going to show you how to clean the toilet, how to carry yourself. They’re not thinking about that. They’re just giving this guy three years to get taught this mentality.

My mom was a probation officer. She would tell me how certain officers would wait outside the person’s house, trying to catch them. And it’s for noncriminal things, right? The average person, I think, believes that people are being violated because they’re doing criminal activity. But I’ve had family and friends incarcerated, and part of their probation would be that they couldn’t drive. In a place with no public transit, they would drive to work and get violated. You can’t associate with known felons, but that means you can’t be around your family members or go to the barbershop. You can’t associate with felons when you just came from prison, with a thousand felons in your face every day. That makes no sense. One time the judge was like, “This is lenient,” and in my head — I couldn’t say this — I was like, Who are you to even say this is lenient? If you gave me three months, that is not lenient. I’m going to lose my job, lose the lease on my house. She made it a condition that I couldn’t even rap.

In prison, you were 23-and-1, right? Isolated all but one hour a day? I can’t even imagine what that’s like. Nobody can. I was just talking to 21 Savage in prison, and I was like, This is the closest you’ve ever been to God in a room like this. The last time I was on 23-and-1, my lawyer came to see me, and I was like, “Did I go crazy and just don’t know I went crazy?” I started writing everything I was feeling, but when I went back and looked at it, I was spelling everything wrong, things I know how to spell. I kept blacking out in the middle of the day — not passing out, but like falling asleep. I was counting the birds on the wire: This bird’s gonna fly off in 10, 9, 8, 7. The bird don’t fly off, start over. Twenty-three and a half hours a day. Come out to take a shower, back to your cell. And I wasn’t in there for punishment — they had me on a mental block because I’m a celebrity, and they didn’t have anywhere to put me. Every time I got out, I’m like, yeah, I’m not the same no more.

You’ve become the face of criminal-justice problems. When did you realize that you had a platform, and that you should use it to advocate for more than yourself? When I saw the support people gave vpn for windows 10. Everybody was saying “Free Meek,” but it was really like saying “Free everybody who goes graphpad prism online - Free Activators these conditions.” It surprised me, because I’ve been in and out of prison for these types of things for the past 11 years, and people were just like: “Aw, he’s stupid. He keeps going to jail.” I am not stupid. It’s just normal mistakes. I caught one case at the age of 19. I am 31. I have never been back to prison for a crime.

You’re working with some powerful people in the Reform Alliance. Jay-Z, Michael Rubin, Robert Kraft, Clara Wu Tsai. Basically all billionaires except me. Robert Kraft saw me in prison, and he was like, How are you still smiling? He was like, If that was me, I would be depressed, mad, angry.

You’re not? You can’t sleep. Yeah, but that comes from my environment. Coming from seeing violence, people robbed, people murdered, you heard gunshots every night — couldn’t sleep.

So how do you deal with the trauma? I just override it. I don’t know. Rapping is one of my therapies. I’ve never been a dweller to sit back and be sad about something. The saddest thing I can think about is Lil Snupe, an artist I had signed, got killed at 18 by a grown man. That bothered me a lot for two years, but I suppressed it and never really addressed it. Then one day, I started realizing that had damaged me, and I thought about it a lot.

Do you actually think Reform Alliance can change the system? I think it’s a possibility we can make a change. In Pennsylvania, they’re talking about changing the laws of probation already, to where the cap is five years. That will be a big win for a lot of Bandicut 3.6.6.676 Crack Registration Key (Torrent) Latest 2021 Free who will enter the system and probably would have gotten 10 to 20.

After everything, you’re still hopeful. Yeah. Hell, yeah. I got a mean team with me. I don’t think none of us lose in anything we do.

Nikole Hannah-Jones is a staff writer for the magazine.

Devin Yalkin is a photographer from New York who has covered a range of subjects for the magazine, including dirt-track racing, Trump rallies and basketball on Montana’s Flathead Indian Reservation.

This interview has been condensed and edited.

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How many people does it take to write a No. 1 hit? In the case of Travis Scott’s smash “Sicko Mode,” which came out Aug. 3, 2018, and has been on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart every week since, 30 different songwriters are credited. That’s a preposterously high number that speaks, in part, to the shift in top-tier rap toward a collaboration-heavy, auteurist mode of creation. It also speaks to the song’s unorthodox structure. “Sicko Mode,” which Scott performed at the Super Bowl halftime show, switches between three different beats created by six different producers, with additional work, it turns out, from a Switzerland-based washing-machine salesman. In addition to three guest vocalists — one of whom is the Canadian superstar Drake, one of whom utters only three words and one of whom has been dead for 13 years — it includes two vocals sampled from landmark rap songs that are themselves dense with further samples from ’70s-era funk bands and, for good measure, a handful of other landmark rap songs. The DNA of “Sicko Mode,” that is, carries with it strands of ancient genetic material, and even if much of it is audible nowhere in the song itself, those strands show up in the credits. Here’s where each one leads.

1.

1.

00:00 — 01:00

00:00 — 01:00

1. The woozy organ riff in the song’s first section was created by the producer and classically trained pianist Rogét Chahayed, whose breakthrough track was D.R.A.M.’s 2016 single “Broccoli.” The bass line and percussion come courtesy of Chauncey Hollis, better known as Hit-Boy, whose most famous co-production is Jay-Z and Kanye West’s “Niggas in Paris.”

2.

00:28 — 01:00

00:28 — 01:00

2. Aubrey Graham, a.k.a. Drake, is the first voice we hear, though his verse will be abruptly cut off. Chahayed has explained that Drake and Travis Scott recorded a complete song over his and Hit-Boy’s beat, but in this Frankenstein version, we hear only about a minute of it.

3.

01:00 — 02:48

01:00 — 02:48

3. Travis Scott, born Jacques Webster, doesn’t appear on his own song until a minute in, when the music changes entirely — one of the track’s many idiosyncrasies. Scott, asked if he could hear the song’s chart-topping potential before its release, says: “Yeah, but other people weren’t hearing it. They’re looking at me like I’m crazy. I’m like, ‘O.K. Just wait till it drops.’”

4.

4A.

4B.

01:00 — 02:45

01:00 — 02:45

4. In 2015, the Swiss producer Ozan Yildirim, a.k.a. Oz, was given an email address that supposedly belonged to Travis Scott. He emailed beats for “a year and a half,” he says, with no reply. Finally, a response arrived: “You have dope [expletive]. Keep sending.” On Jan. 11, 2018, Oz sent what would become the second section of “Sicko Mode.”

4A. Oz got help with a synthesizer sound from his friend Mirsad Dervic, a.k.a. M-Dee, an appliance salesman who makes music on his days off.

4B. Oz also used a sound from a pack of samples created by the German producing duo Tim and Kevin Gomringer, a.k.a. Cubeatz.

5.

5A.

5B.

5C.

01:15

01:15

5. Scott raps three words — “Gimme the Loot” — and as a result, 14 different people earn credits. Scott is quoting 1994’s “Gimme the Loot” by the Notorious B.I.G. and includes a sample from it, so Biggie (Christopher Wallace) and the producer Easy Mo Bee (Osten Harvey) get credit. Things telescope from there …

5A. “Gimme the Loot” samples a vocal from Gang Starr’s “Just to Get a Rep,” which means that song’s authors, Guru (Keith Elam) and DJ Premier (Christopher Martin), are credited.

5B. “Gimme the Loot” also samples Sticky Fingaz’s verse on Onyx’s rap classic “Throw Ya Gunz,” so even though Fingaz (Kirk Jones) plays no part on “Sicko Mode,” he’s credited, along with his Onyx partners Chyskillz (Chylow Parker), Sonny Seeza (Tyrone Taylor) and Fredro Starr (Fred Scruggs).

5C. “Gimme the Loot” samples another vocal, from A Tribe Called Quest’s “Scenario (Remix)” — a line from the late Troy Anthony Hall, a.k.a. Kid Hood. Strangely, Hall isn’t a credited writer on Biggie’s song or Scott’s, though Tribe’s Q-Tip (Kamaal Fareed), Phife Dawg (Malik Taylor) and Ali Shaheed Jones-Muhammad are, along with the collaborators Busta Rhymes (Trevor Smith),Bryan Higgins and James Jackson.

6.

01:36

01:36

6. Swae Lee, born Khalif Brown and half of the pop-rap duo Rae Sremmurd, turns a fragmentary sung phrase — “Someone said” — into one of “Sicko Mode”’s unlikeliest hooks.

7.

01:40

01:40

7. In one of Scott’s many tributes to Houston screw music — a narcotic local subgenre named after the late DJ Screw — Scott includes two pitched-down a cappella bars from a Screw compatriot, John Edward Hawkins, a.k.a. Big Hawk, who was killed in 2006.

8.

8A.

02:17

02:17

8. Scott shouts out the Miami rap icon Uncle Luke — born Luther Campbell, notorious for his work in 2 Live Crew — and drops in a sample from his 1992 song “I Wanna Rock.”

8A. “I Wanna Rock” samples K.C. and the Sunshine Band’s “That’s the Way (I Like It),” and so that group’s Harry Wayne Casey and Richard Finch get credits, despite appearing nowhere on “Sicko Mode.”

9.

02:48 — 02:56

02:48 — 02:56

9. The beat grinds to a halt with a series of distorted kick drums before moving to its final section. This transition contains production from the Houston multi-instrumentalist Mike Dean, an executive producer on “Astroworld.”

10.

02:56 — 05:12

02:56 — 05:12

10. Tay Keith, born BryTavious Chambers, just graduated from college in Tennessee. He was producing for local M.C.s when Drake got in touch via Instagram to discuss collaborating. He’s responsible for the final section, including a drum pattern much like the one he built for Drake’s “Nonstop.”

11.

XXX

XXX

11. Scott has known the Chicago rapper CyHi the Prynce, born Cydel Young, since Scott’s early days with Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. Music crew, of which Young is a member. Young helped Scott in crafting lyrics.

Jonah Weiner is a contributing writer for the magazine. His last feature for the magazine was about the director Adam McKay.

Source photographs: Oz and Cubeatz: Alexandros Tiakas/Views of Views Media. Big Hawk: Shawn Brauch/Pen & Pixel Graphics, from the University of Houston Libraries. Tay Keith: Zach Boisjoly. Mirsad Dervic by Ozan Yildirim. All other source photographs: Getty Images.

Bradley Cooper’s “A Star Is Born” is a movie about an unknown singer named Ally, who’s afraid to perform her own songs until a famous musician takes one of her ballads, rearranges it, then drags her Mocha Pro 2019 V6.0.1.128 Crack - Crack Key For U to sing it with him for a stadium full of people who have no idea who she is. That song — “Shallow” — won an Oscar last month. It’s a soaring, Airbus of a ballad that’s satisfying to sing whether you’re Kelly Clarkson or pitchy old me.

But “Shallow” isn’t the number that epitomizes the movie. That comes past the halfway point, and your response to it sums up how far under Cooper’s spell you’ve fallen. I was under pretty deep. Ally’s on the verge of superstardom, but nearly all of the singing we’ve seen her do has been with Cooper’s character, Jackson Maine — this impossible fusion of grunge, roots country, pills, booze, pain, encroaching deafness and the Whole Damn American Truth.

We can sense that Jackson’s artistic attraction to Ally arises not just from her industrial-strength voice but from her way with an abstractly honest lyric and her knack for melody. She, too, seems “authentic” and virtuous (she scribbles down ideas in a notebook; she’s struggled and suffered to “make it”). His aversion to the artifice of showbiz would seem to be hers: It’s all about the craft for us, baby. The spell being cast is a matter of taste and prerogative, essentially that Ally is made from Jackson’s rib of purity.

I, at least, assumed that Ally would turn into somebody like Brandi Carlile, a songwriter whose singing regularly reaches the stratosphere but who we can tell is grounded and real because she holds a guitar the way, for some of us, a lawyer holds a degree from Yale — and because . she . isn’t . a dancer. Ally, on the other hand, does dance (perhaps because it’s what her craft-neutral wisp of a manager wants). And the first time we see America seeing her dance is after she’s introduced as the musical guest on “Saturday Night Live.” The song — “Why Did You Do That?” — opens with the plinky simulations of a steel drum or a music box, and then the question “Why?” “Why do you look so good in those jeans?” she sings, as if she were all of Destiny’s Children. “Why’d you come around me with an ass like that?” Ally’s onstage with new, orange hair. (Thanks, craft-neutral manager!) She’s wearing spangling athleisure and a pink hooded jacket made of a fabric I can describe only as “gift bag.” She’s with a male dancer who’s dressed complementarily in blue, and when she says, “ass like that,” he grinds himself into her.

[Read Rachel Syme’s profile of Lady Gaga.]

It’s here that I should say that I love this song. But according to the movie’s competing authenticities (Jackson’s idea of it versus her manager’s; rock versus pop), love is a luxury. Gaga wrote “Why Did You Do That?” with, among other people, Diane Warren, a master of lugubrious balladry, a cheese whiz. But these women are grilling that cheese. Gaga’s enthusiasm for repetition in a chorus slips an earworm on the hook. Why did you do that — do that, do that, do that, do that — to ME? Next comes a sugary helping of “Hoooh-oooh-oooh,” while a sloppy, synthy bass line slithers around it all. This song is sung with such umbrage and so much alarm that you don’t know whether to sing along or call Gloria Allred.

But I watched Ally perform it with my hand to my mouth. I might have said aloud: “Oh, Ally. Jackson’s going to hate this.” And no sooner had I said it than the movie cut to Jackson watching with a face of stone. This song is confection and sex and feel-copping. It’s showbiz. Basically, it’s everything Jackson would seem to hate about whatever music is right now.

When the movie cuts to Jackson’s face, the Ike Turner of “What’s Love Got to Do With It” crossed my mind. And a few scenes later, a version of Ike comes over him while Ally is trying to have herself a “Pretty Woman” bath and Jackson enters. She’s sudsy. He’s soused. “Why you come around me with an ass like that,” he says in disgust. “Maybe I [expletive] failed you,” he goes on. “You’re embarrassing,” he slurs. “You’re just [expletive] ugly,” he slurs some more. Jackson doesn’t want to see “Why Did You Do That?” as the hit of an ingénue, something anonymous-seeming that a new pop star tries before a truer identity bubbles up: Pink doing “Most Girls,” Katy Perry and “I Kissed a Girl,” Rihanna’s “Pon De Replay,” Gaga’s “Just Dance,” whatever the perma-ingénue Ariana Grande’s currently up to.

Last fall, this one song, from this megahit movie, provoked perplexed essays and inspired The Times’s Kyle Buchanan to track down Warren and ask, Is it supposed to be bad? Jackson thinks so. As much as I wanted to save this sexy, damaged, doomed man, on this, we disagree. “Maybe it’s time to let the old ways die,” goes his most mournful lyric. But maybe it’s also time to admit nothing’s wrong with an ass like that.

Wesley Morris is a staff writer for the magazine, a critic at large for The New York Times and co-host of the podcast “Still Processing.”

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The children’s song “Baby Shark” is a global smash, a hit that has captivated millions, conquering charts from Asia to Australia to the United States, where, this January, it reached No. 32 on the Billboard Hot 100. It’s also a folk song, with origins as obscure as “The Dowie Dens o’ Yarrow” or any of those other ancient airs whose authorship long ago vanished in the mists. “Baby Shark” is thought to have been born in American summer camps, perhaps several decades ago. It is a staple of singalongs, the sort of song that gets belted out by groups gathered at marshmallow roasts and swimming pools. One theory holds that the song was born in the summer of 1975, when Steven Spielberg’s “Jaws” was in theaters and great white sharks were gliding through the murky waters of collective consciousness, to the strains of John Williams’s brooding score.

The precise provenance of “Baby Shark” may never be pinned down. Its recent history is clearer. In November 2015, Pinkfong, a South Korean educational brand, released a hopped-up rendition with an accompanying animated video. The following June, Pinkfong put out a second video, “Baby Shark Dance,” featuring two cute kids performing goofy dance moves. It was this clip that inspired the hashtag #BabySharkChallenge, instigating a viral craze that has racked up more than two billion YouTube views and spawned unnumbered spinoffs starring everyone from Indonesian farmworkers to Filipino marines to Cardi B to, undoubtedly, your friends, your family, your baby trussed in a shark costume. In iobit malware fighter 6.3 serial key - Crack Key For U United States, the #BabySharkChallenge has received an extra viral boost, cross-pollinating with a dance craze linked to Drake’s anthem “In My Feelings,” in which people exit moving motor vehicles to dance and lip-sync as the car putters alongside.

In other words, “Baby Shark” has completed two full transmigrations between folk and pop. It’s a folk song that became a pop song that filtered into social media to become a folk song again — a grass-roots phenomenon that propelled the pop recording to improbable heights of ubiquity. It exemplifies several features of 21st-century culture: the porous boundaries between the pop industrial complex and the amateur homespun; a globalized circulation of songs based as much on memes as on music; the popularity of unchallenging dance “challenges”; the hegemony of Drake.

“Baby Shark” also exemplifies the timeless appeal of really stupid songs. Musically, “Baby Shark” is efficient, with a foursquare beat driving an unvarying melody that returns repeatedly to the wordless chorus “Doo doo doo doo doo doo.” This refrain repeats fully 27 times — a lot, in a song that runs 1 minute 36 seconds. The first minute is devoted to introducing the dramatis personae: “Baby A real player named eazy a real player - Crack Key For U doo doo doo doo doo . Mommy Shark/Doo doo doo doo doo doo,” etc. The narrative, such as it is, is compressed into the song’s final third. The shark family goes hunting, and its prey elude capture: “Safe at last/Doo doo doo doo doo doo.”

Even the most rabid “Baby Shark” fan will concede Advanced System Repair Pro 1.9.6.4 Crack With Serial Key Download it is infantile. Which is not to say that it’s a children’s song. In fact, it’s an adult song masquerading as a kids’ song. “Baby Shark” has been sanitized: Traditional versions sung by campers are mischievous and macabre, telling tales of sharks attacking swimmers who lose limbs and, usually, lives. (“Call 911/Doo doo doo . It’s too late/Doo doo doo.”) In one variation, a “surfer dude” is mauled, dies and is reincarnated as a baby shark: an artful cycle of gore, death, rebirth and more gore.

“Baby Shark,” by contrast, seems engineered to please the parents. It’s a garishly McAfee Internet Security 2020 Crack + Serial Number Free Download affirmation of the nuclear family Aiseesoft FoneLab Offline Installer ends happily; its dance can be mastered by the most rhythm-impaired. Is it a stretch to suggest that “Baby Shark” is music for grown-ups who are, as it were, in their feelings, stressed by the turmoil and dislocations of 21st-century Ron`s Editor 2019 Crack - Crack Key For U Compare “Baby Shark” with music popular with millennials: relentlessly dour rap and hip-hop-inflected pop, full of menace and foreboding, which face the bummer of 2019 head-on. “Baby Shark” offers an antidote, an escape: a song that delivers us from danger — safe at last! — leaving nary a trace of blood in the water.

Jody Rosen is a contributing writer for the magazine and the author of a forthcoming book about bicycles.

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Last year, on one of the first stops of Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s “On the Run II” tour, the lights of London Stadium dimmed, and the video for “Apeshit” began playing on enormous screens. The video opens with the Carters dressed in gorgeous suits (hers a Peter Pilotto in pink and red; his, sea-foam green Dries Van Noten) standing — alone — in front of the Mona Lisa at the Louvre. “Have you ever seen a crowd going apeshit?” the song asks, and the answer lay in the reaction of the British concertgoers, who screamed, cried and danced.

Whose history belongs in our museums? The video and song meditate on this question. The history of black people has too often been presented as little more than a curiosity. The 1889 world’s fair in Paris, for example, included a “human zoo” of indigenous people taken from French colonies and placed in “natural” habitats for onlookers. During the 16th century, Africans were exhibited in the Vatican, and in 1906 a young Congolese man called Ota Benga was forcibly kept at the Bronx Zoo. Even now, landmark museums like the Louvre tend to exhibit artwork that depicts Africans and their descendants as household servants and domestic workers. The Carters know this painful past, and in “Apeshit” they confront it.

Lyrics like “We livin’ lavish, lavish/I got expensive fabrics/I got expensive habits” could give the impression that the song is merely reveling in the luxuries that extreme wealth can buy. One great complexity regarding the couple is their overt embrace of capitalism. Are they disrupting the status quo or reinforcing it? But just beneath all that spending seethes an abject rage. “I said no to the Super Bowl, you need me, I don’t need you,” Jay-Z raps. “Every night we in the end zone, tell the N.F.L. we in stadiums too.” The Carters are Colin Kaepernick-level fed up with institutions that barely recognize them, whether it be the Grammys, which nominated Jay-Z eight times last year but gave him zero wins, or Coachella, which featured Beyoncé as its first black female headliner only last year. “Gimme my check, put some respect on my check. Or pay me in equity, pay me in equity” is about money, yes, but it’s also a cry to be acknowledged for what they’ve earned. Their best revenge is their paper, but it’s also their own music-streaming service (Tidal) and a clothing line (Ivy Park).

[Get to know the author of this article, Jenna Wortham, in a new Behind the Byline interview.]

The Carters have collaborated for almost two decades on songs that rotate around their love of money (“’03 Bonnie & Clyde”) and of infatuation (“Crazy in Love”). But “Apeshit” represents a new era for their economic philosophies and value systems. Wealth isn’t just for flashy living; it’s about creating an empire for themselves and their offspring. Love is hard, unflattering work that sometimes requires setting aside ego and reputation. When Beyoncé sings of plans to get her girls and “put ’em all on a spaceship,” you feel that it’s not lyrically convenient but that she really means it. What would a world created entirely by and for black people look like?

Even as Beyoncé and Jay-Z have an estimated net worth of more than a billion dollars between them, they have managed to remain largely unscathed by a cultural tide that disdains the obscenity of late-stage capitalism. Perhaps that’s because they seem to be trying to undo a larger project of disinheritance. The video continues its tour of the Louvre, showing the Carters and dancers posing among some of the world’s most famous art. They are asserting that they belong. “All of my people, I free ’em all,” Beyoncé sings. It’s a boast, but it’s also their mission.

Jenna Wortham is a staff writer for the magazine and co-host of the podcast “Still Processing.”

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If you grew up listening to pop punk, as I did, then it’s easy to feel as though the mid-to-late aughts were lost to a fold in adolescent space-time. Are we even sure that the genre ever happened? Pop punk married punk power chords with the singable hook of a radio hit. The aesthetic was embarrassing, even in its time — circuses, graveyards, men in eyeliner. Want to fantasize about murdering your ex? For a brief, fun lapse in those dubious years, such thoughts were best expressed in a high, clear whine, interspersed with bouts of indiscriminate screaming. Today we might call pop punk “problematic” (or maybe we’d call it musical theater). To me, at 14, it was more than visceral, a soundtrack for a time of hormonal disarray.

Flash-forward nearly 15 years to the present, and somehow, improbably, pop punk is back in the form of the rap song “Lucid Dreams” by Juice WRLD. The track first appeared on the streaming platform SoundCloud and rose through the ranks of the Billboard Hot 100 on the wings of brooding, sung-rapped pain: “I still see your shadows in my room/can’t take back the love that I gave you/it’s to the point where I love and I hate you.” “Lucid Dreams” is pop punk recapitulated — the same themes, the same whine, the same singable hook, with the power chords swapped out for insular drums and the plaintive guitar of Sting’s “Shape of My Heart.” It echoes the pangs of a Fall Out Boy track, throbbing with urgent teenage despair.

Juice WRLD is 20, from the suburbs of Chicago. He describes his own music as “a therapy session” and cites influences like Fall Out Boy, Bullet for My Valentine, Senses Fail and Panic! at the Disco. Like most rappers of this latest generation, these influences evolved in a post-streaming world, where albums existed as free-floating tracks, somewhat detached from imposed genre labels.

Hit pop songs that exploit algorithms are sometimes described as “Spotifycore” or “streambait.” If “Lucid Dreams” was not produced to game the numbers, then at least this new system of musical incentives might help explain its unlikely rise. Rap music turns on its habit-forming beats, and pop punk thrives on earwormish hooks. Accounting for the keen melodrama of both genres, it makes perfect sense that a hybridized form would triumph in this new streaming ecosystem.

Juice WRLD is not the first or only artist to work in the emo-rap subgenre. The rapper LiL Peep, who died from an overdose of fentanyl and Xanax in 2017, was extolled as “the future of emo.” The same might be said of XXXTentacion, a rapper who made violent, confessional music before he was fatally shot last June. The troubles of this music scene have been well covered; in brief, they reflect the real perils of our time — gun violence, a crisis of masculinity, dual drug and mental-health epidemics. If the pop-punk songs of decades past were grandiose enough to be written off as camp, then the latest wave of emo-rap seems somehow right-sized for the terrors of our moment. With this in mind, “Lucid Dreams” sounds less catchy, or maybe it just sounds less catchy to adults.

Jamie Lauren Keiles is a writer in Queens working on a novel about smoking.

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A couple of weeks before she would step onstage to accept the Grammy for Album of the Year, Kacey Musgraves was under the covers in the bedroom at the back of her tour bus, pondering the nature of the universe. She had a little unexpected time on her hands. A show in Chicago had been canceled, thanks to the polar freeze that had descended over the Midwest, leaving her stuck in the middle of a vast tundra with a buildup of tour adrenaline and nowhere to put it. She watched some “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” read a little “The Catcher in the Rye” and then lost herself down her favorite YouTube rabbit hole, a video genre in which someone mashes up tweedy old-school physics lectures with wonky electro beats. “It’s like if Daft Punk went totally science,” she says, “and I’m here for that.”

Later, she would stand in a diaphanous scarlet Valentino dress at the Grammys, giving a speech that could, given her tone and reputation, be read as subtly anti-authoritarian. “Life is pretty tumultuous right now for all of us,” she told the crowd. “I feel like, because of that, art is really thriving.” Musgraves is well known for her support of the L.G.B.T. community, her unabashed love of weed and her ability to turn a cutting phrase in her perfect Texas twang — particularly when she’s writing about the shackles of social convention. She started writing her winning album, “Golden Hour,” early in 2016, when Donald Trump was still assigning stinging nicknames to his Republican primary opponents, and began recording it just after Trump’s inauguration. She has tweeted in support of the Women’s March and in disdain of Eric Trump’s family-branded Christmas ornaments. She speaks with pride about the stack of detention slips her mother still keeps from her daughter’s time in the Mineola, Tex., school system: “I was always getting in trouble for, like, insubordination.” Add all that to the nose piercing that, as she famously sings on the rapturous single “Slow Burn,” made her grandmother cry, and you might expect her album to be a bit of a call to arms, a middle finger to a broken world.

Not so much. “I just got tripped out one day,” she says, musing on her inspiration for the album. “Thinking, Whoa, wait, we live in this world that seems so mundane, but at the same time that I’m sitting here, there’s things that are glowing in the ocean and eating each other — and there’s also northern lights and shooting stars and plants that grow and literally heal people.” She paused for breath. Vectorworks 2021 Crack Full Free Version Download Full Feature it’s all happening around us, you know?” Falling for the man who is now her husband — the singer and songwriter Ruston Kelly — was another part of the album’s genesis. “It’s sort of a love song to him,” she says, “but also to nature, the human race, Earth and why we’re here. We don’t know, and I kind of love it.”

In other words, this wry firebrand’s big statement on the state of the world — at a time when so many of the issues she has become famous writing about, like feminism and gay rights, are making daily headlines — is a metaphysical country-pop record more inspired by Carl Sagan than Willie Nelson. And just so we’re clear, Musgraves was on acid only part of the time. “It’s not like I was tripping my face off every day,” she clarifies. (After she told reporters that psychedelics influenced a couple of songs, including “Slow Burn,” it was all anyone wanted to talk about.) “It has only been a couple times. And very responsibly! Enough to be able to get outside of yourself and see a different perspective or point of view.”

What makes Musgraves such a resonant figure right now, in fact, is the way her response to a dark, anxious moment in human history is to move willfully closer to lightness, to stillness, toward the possibility of a world that comes in more colors than red or blue. When she talks about art thriving in this climate, she means it — just not in the same sense as, say, angry punks railing against the Reagan administration. What she means is that right now, the best rebellion involves turning off the hate and making space for hope. Or, as she puts it: “The [expletive] storm won’t last forever, and I want to make music that does.”

[Watch Kacey Musgraves turn country music psychadelic.]

I caught up with Musgraves in Wisconsin, on the tail end of January’s alarming deep freeze, which had temperatures in the upper Midwest dropping as low as minus 40. (I missed her in Chicago, where everyone was trapped inside, the streets vacant apart from the odd extreme-weather junkie taking photographs of ice floes.) Far from Valentino, she was, for the moment, in sweaty Victoria’s Secret workout tights and a fluorescent-green beanie, sitting straddle-style on the floor of the bar at a Madison venue called the Sylvee, having just finished a workout via Skype with Erin Oprea, a trainer to many of Nashville’s stars.

“O.K., so this is the one I put on my story yesterday,” she said, finding a clip she had posted to Instagram and showing me her phone. It was something called Symphony of Science’s “Quantum World,” a favorite among those space-disco physics videos. “Featuring Neil DeGrasse Tyson,” she chuckled, reading from the chyron at the bottom of a related clip. I had indeed seen her Instagramming this kind of mysterious, late-night Discovery Channel-type stuff — the sort of thing teenagers once saw at the IMAX theater on a field trip after getting stoned. How did she get into it? “Oh, who knows, it was years ago,” she replied, then sang happily along to a remix that showed Morgan Freeman superimposed on a colorful tunnel of celestial Bulk Image Downloader 5.62.0.0 Crack + Registration Code Free 2020. One of the scientists’ 1970s professorial look, she pointed out, was “literally like what the band wears” in her stage show.

When Musgraves was 18 and a contestant on the reality show “Nashville Star” — she placed seventh — she had to fill out a getting-to-know-the-contenders C.V. Under the category of “dream vacation,” she listed “staying in a huge log cabin in the mountains, riding horses, hunting and four-wheeling with my friends.” The “craziest” thing she’d ever done? “Hunting for Bigfoot deep in the woods of East Texas. . We didn’t get him.” That version of Musgraves — the one who cited Jack in the Box egg rolls and beer as her favorite foods — still appears at every show, even when she’s dressed like Bianca Jagger heading to Studio 54. She’s the one leading the ritual preshow group shot of tequila, taken from tiny cactus-shaped glasses she and her band have long been toting from show to show. And she’s the one hanging with me on the floor of a bar in Wisconsin, looking at videos by a user with the handle “melodysheep.”

And yet even in her early years, when Musgraves looked more the part of your average Nashville aspirant, in cowboy boots and blond highlights, there was always a kind of poise, an innate regality that set her apart. This, perhaps, is the other side of her East Texas grit — the one that manifests less as yee-haw joy and more as D.I.Y. conviction. “When it comes to art, I will not bend,” she says. “I won’t.”

Musgraves grew up in Golden, Tex., a town so small it doesn’t even have an elementary school. “A few hundred people,” she guesses, is the total population. It’s about 90 minutes from Dallas, and about six or seven miles outside Mineola, where Musgraves and her sister, Kelly Christine Sutton — a photographer, who shot the “Golden Hour” cover — went to school, and where their parents had a small printing shop. “Even at a young age,” Sutton says, “I always knew my sister would be known for her Oxygen XML Editor Free Activate. And not really on anyone else’s timeline. She would make it happen on her own terms.” It’s their parents’ model of small-town independence, Musgraves figures, that gave her a tend-your-own-garden will. “A large part of who I am comes from the fact that I never saw my parents have bosses,” she says. “They’ve never answered to anyone but themselves. And not in a baller way — like very small-business, check-to-check kind of a thing. But they made all their own decisions.”

Growing up, she had a Spice Girls poster in her room — Ginger, with her wild tattoo, made a strong impression — and listened to emo rock bands like the Used and Dashboard Confessional. But that wasn’t the sort of music she played. “I was part of this kids’ group called the Buckaroos that would meet every month in the Fort Worth Stockyards and would dress up in cowboy clothing and stroll the stockyards and learn instruments,” she recalls. “There were mentors there who kind of encourage kids to learn this old stuff.” By 9, she was writing her own songs and playing guitar; by 12, she was singing Western swing and yodeling at festivals on the weekends. Bookings and press kits were handled by her grandmother — the same one who later cried when Musgraves pierced her nose, and who referred to “It Is What It Is,” the singer’s melancholic ode to casual sex, as “the slut song.” “She’s a hoot,” Musgraves says. “She was wheeling and dealing.”

There was, of course, the requisite period in which a teenage Musgraves turned her back on the whole cowgirl thing. “I was like, Dude, none of my friends think this is cool. If they saw me I’d be superembarrassed. I’m yodeling, you know what I mean?” She rebelled — for a second. “I chopped off all my hair and was like: Suck on that! Now I can’t wear a cowboy hat, Mom!” (“You would not believe how upset my family was,” Sutton remembers.) But this rebellion turned out to be short-lived. By the time Musgraves moved full time to Nashville, at 19, she had realized “nobody really in the country world was embracing the hard-core roots of the genre.” But she had come to worship John Prine and Loretta Lynn — big-hearted, sharp-tongued, storytelling pillars of country’s outlaw roots who had risen up in the ’70s by staging their own insurgency against the bubble-gumming-up of the genre. “I randomly already had this superknowledge about all the old songs that came before me, and that style, the Western fashion,” Musgraves says. “I was like: I’m going to bring it back. I want to mix that in with something modern.” Prine himself is now one of her many admirers; he compares her to “a goofy Cinderella.” “She has a certain honesty to her voice,” he says. “She’s breaking down barriers.”

There’s a famous tale about Kacey Musgraves’s first big showcase performance for the Country Radio Seminar. This is a big-deal event in the business; its attendees are queen-makers in an industry in which success is still determined by access to radio airwaves. The story of her 2013 debut there smacks of a plotline on “Nashville” — appropriate, given that she co-wrote “Undermine,” one of the hits to emerge from the juggernaut TV series. You can easily picture the kind of episode Musgraves’s performance might have inspired. A young woman takes the stage at the legendary Ryman Auditorium, the so-called Mother Church of country, about to play the song that could make or break her career. We learn that she’s being hyped — thanks to her preternatural songwriting skills, good looks and the already-feverish crossover response to her first single, “Merry Go Round” — as the Veronica to Taylor Swift’s Betty: a sassier but potentially just as marketable product. As is the industry’s way, the corporate powers would like this rising phenom to be herself, but only within reason. They’d prefer she refrain from playing what will become her third single — the one with the lines about smoking joints and kissing girls — until after she can already be heard in every Walgreens in America. But the woman steps up to the microphone, leans into it a little and speaks: “I’m kind of a big believer in people doing whatever the hell they want to do, because I feel like society is probably going to have an opinion either way.” Then she starts strumming “Follow Your Arrow.” As she delivers its opening line — “If you save yourself for marriage, you’re a bore/If you don’t save yourself for marriage you’re a horr-” — the crowd gasps. Then she finishes — “-ible person” — and the audience laughs. A star is born.

It’s easy to wonder where Musgraves got the nerve. It’s one thing to admire your parents’ entrepreneurial spirit, and another to hold your own amid the chaos and pressure of the starmaking machine. For Musgraves, performing alongside Dolly Parton at the Grammys, winning Album of the Year, presenting an award at the Oscars — all of this is unequivocally her dream. But it’s also something she believes she could live without, and remembering this has become a kind of daily meditation, especially as the scope of her fame has increased. “I don’t get high off my own supply, you know?” she says, mentioning, by way of inspiration, Willie Nelson’s ability to welcome “Republicans, rappers, presidents, my grandpa, your grandpa, our hipster friends, me” without treating anyone as superior to anyone else. “You can be proud of yourself and excited for what you’re doing, and you could even really have a high level of confidence, without being a D-bag.”

In Musgraves’s mind, she made it the minute she signed her first songwriting deal, back in 2009, penning tunes that would be sold around Nashville to other performers. That was the day she realized she would never again have to work a job in which she dressed up as Disney characters for children’s birthday parties, one of many day gigs she had endured. “For the next few years,” she says, “I was like: Really? Wait, I can use my brain, sit on my ass and make a living?” When her current label first made her an offer to record as an artist, Musgraves turned it down; she was having a perfectly good time as a writer. She also knew she didn’t have real access to her own voice yet. “Those songs were fine for other artists,” she says. “Maybe they could be popular on the radio or something, but they’re not very me.”

By the time Musgraves eventually located her particular voice, it was already honed to a sharp edge. Her first hit, “Merry Go Round,” from 2012, is packed with the kind of mordant wordplay she’d be known for, conjuring a “same trailer, different park” world where people marry out of boredom and settle “just like dust” into small-town lives: “Mama’s hooked on Mary Kay, brother’s hooked on Mary Jane, Daddy’s hooked on Mary two doors down.” But after two albums and multiple world tours, Musgraves felt worn out by her own verbal cleverness. “Everyone hopefully knows I can flip a phrase by now, and I like that,” she says. “But I don’t want bumper-sticker songs.” It also concerned Musgraves that the refreshing directness with which she had addressed social issues might start to feel heavy-handed, even ideologically gimmicky. She is, as she puts it diplomatically, “noticing things about a real player named eazy a real player - Crack Key For U world that I’m not happy with.” But when she started working on “Golden Hour,” it no longer felt right to address them directly. “Everyone that’s listened to any of my music knows exactly how I feel,” she says. “This record does kind of nod to some of the social and political things that are going on, but it’s just doing it in a different way. It’s not as linear.”

Источник: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/03/07/magazine/top-songs.html

The 100 Greatest Car Songs of All Time: Staff List

Whether or not you’ll be first in line for the new Fast & Furious movie this weekend, the movie’s release confirms what we’ve long suspected: It’s officially car season. Popular music has been occupied with all things automotive for ages, but particularly since the COVID pandemic started, cars have been everywhere in songs, videos and performances — unsurprising, given our crescendoing desire to hit the road to just go somewhere, anywhere 4k video downloader key mac past year-plus. And now, with the world reopening, there is absolutely no time like the present to (responsibly) pile into the nearest ride and (safely) hit the highway for some quality road tripping.

In honor of this moment — as well as Billboard‘s recent digital cover story on the musical impact of the Fast & Furious franchise — we’ve compiled a list of our staff’s 100 favorite driving songs, spanning each of the past 10 decades of auto tunes. Most are of course road-focused, but not all; we wanted to pay tribute to the car’s place in music history as not just a transportation tool but a status symbol, a metaphor for excitement and escape, and a place for whatever backseat business needs to be accomplished. Truck songs were also considered, though not bus or motorcycle, and while not all songs are explicitly (or entirely) four-wheel-focused, all need at least some specific lyrical mention of cars or driving and riding to be counted.

Check out our list below, with a Spotify playlist of all 100 songs at the bottom, and try not to run through too many red lights and stop signs when blasting them out of your Bugatti, GTO or Little Red Corvette this weekend.

100. THE CARS, “DRIVE” 

Make and Model: The only Billboard Hot 100 entry for new wave greats The Cars with an automotive title to match their band name, “Drive” was also their biggest hit on the chart, motoring all the way to No. 3 in the fall of 1984.

Fuel Economy: Truth told, “Drive” is pretty tangentially car-themed for a song with its title — the lyric is mostly focused on a man asking rhetorical questions to demonstrate his value in a relationship, which is the only reason the stunning synth-rock ballad isn’t higher on this list — but the central chorus Q (and the artist/song name combo) makes its appearance here essential nonetheless.

Overdrive: “Who’s gonna drive you home tonight?” All the history, intimacy, trust and distance of a relationship in one six-word question from motorist to passenger. — ANDREW UNTERBERGER

99. JONI MITCHELL, “CAR ON A HILL”

Make and Model: Mitchell turns waiting for her absent lover to arrive into a sonic masterpiece that GetFLV Pro 30.2108.1868 Crack + Registration Code Free {Latest-2021} as innovative, ambitious and magical today as it did when it came out nearly 50 years ago on 1974’s Court and Spark.

Fuel Economy:  Mitchell perfectly captures her fears that her once red-hot romance has turned tepid as her man is three hours late — and counting — but it’s the shifting tempos, bleating horns and choral interlude,all surrounding a funky beat, that keep the listener captivated.

Overdrive: Rumors are that Mitchell wrote the song about Jackson Browne or Glenn Frey, but we owe whoever kept her waiting a debt of thanks for inspiring such lines as “Fast tires come screaming around the bend/ But there’s still no buzzer/ They roll on/ And I’m waiting for his car on the hill.” — MELINDA NEWMAN

98. LLOYD BANKS FEAT. JUELZ SANTANA, “BEAMER, BENZ OR BENTLEY”

Make and Model: A hip-hop classic from 2010, “Beamer, Benz or Bentley” finds Lloyd Banks and Juelz Santana lyrically flexing about all the perks of being fresh, fly and so damn high.

Fuel Economy: With rhymes and bars that flow as fast as a 500-horsepower engine, Banks and Santana’s raps perfectly ride the track’s electric beat.

Overdrive: Banks became the early pace car for limber rhymes in 2010s hip-hop with the lyric, “I’m so fly, I’m so ferry and the way I flow is very/ Ginsu or machete, way my pencil move is deadly.” — DARLENE ADEROJU

97. LEE ANN WOMACK, “A LITTLE PAST LITTLE ROCK”

Make and Model: In her first Hot 100 hit, country star Lee Ann Womack speeds away from Dallas heading due north in the hopes of putting physical and emotional distance between her and heartbreak — though she finds the former unsurprisingly easier than the latter.

Fuel Economy: The chest-tightening ballad does a brilliant job of demonstrating the liberation that hitting the road can represent for those desperately in need of a second chance at life or love — though only up to a point.

Overdrive: If you’re listening to this one in the car, maybe best to pull over when Womack’s voice frays just a little on the “I’ve got to keep my heart out of this/ And both hands on the wheel” part of the chorus; driving through tears isn’t particularly safe for anyone. — A.U.

96. RICK ROSS FEAT. CHRISETTE MICHELE AND DRAKE, “ASTON MARTON MUSIC”

Make and Model: Though released in 2010, the J.U.S.T.I.C.E. League-produced beat to this luxurious cruising anthem strikes an old-school feel, with Rick Ross Corel WinDVD Pro Free Activate Drake trading turns rapping and crooning, respectively — while Chrisette Michele anchors the track with a breezy, carefree hook. 

Fuel Economy: Aside from the sheer star power — at the time of the song’s release, all three artists had scored a Billboard 200 No. 1 entry in the prior year-plus — the track oozes top-down, stereo-up vibes, though Drake’s backseat driving is there to Magic Photo Recovery 5.1 Registration key Crack Free you that you’re always just a few blocks away from your ex’s place. 

Overdrive: Hard to go against the chorus in this instance, but if you listen closely at the end of Rozay’s first verse, he raps “In my two-seater she’s the one that I would take,” before throwing in a jubilant wee! that’s too good to pass up. — JOSH GLICKSMAN

95. DAVID LINDLEY, “MERCURY BLUES”

Make and Model:  Originally co-written and recorded as a jaunty blues by K.C. Douglas in 1948, and subsequently covered by such artists as A real player named eazy a real player - Crack Key For U Miller and Alan Jackson, Lindley’s 1981 version cuts the brake line and lead-foots it from the opening count to the cacophonous guitar-and-drum pile-up at the end. (Cue ‘70s TV detective show clip of a car plunging over a cliff and bursting into flames.)

Fuel Economy: Lindley’s guitar virtuosity, which helped define the California rock sound of the mid-‘70s and early ‘80s, and his high-register vocals — that’s his falsetto on Jackson Browne’s live version of Maurice Williams’ ’“Stay” — make his “Mercury Blues” a giddy joy ride down an empty four-lane.

Fourth Gear: “I’m crazy ‘bout a Mercury” figures in all but one verse — and, between the lines, Lindley brings that fervor to life with some crazy-good guitar runs that channel Chuck Berry through his sui generis six-string sound.  –FRANK DIGIACOMO

94. OBZESIÓN, “MI TROKITA”

Make and Model: One of the first norteño songs to go viral on TikTok, Obzesión’s “Mi Trokita” stood out thanks to its cheeky and catchy lyrics, inspired by Texas’ truck scene, and an irresistible uptempo cambia beat that gave life to yet another dance challenge on the social media platform. Released in late 2020, the track peaked at No. 19 on Billboard’s Hot Latin Songs chart this March.

Fuel Economy: The song’s simple yet effective lyrics speak to that special bond with an old but mighty truck that can still get you from point A to B. Even better, the flashy and customized trokita is still turning heads as you cruise around the neighborhood.

Fourth Gear: The love for the truck scene in Texas at the song’s core is perfectly captured in the song’s hook — “Y run, run, run, No se raja mi trokita, Tirando aceite pasando la garita” — which essentially translates to “vroom vroom vroom, my little truck doesn’t give up/ Leaking oil passing by la garita” (a famous parking lot where truck aficionados meet up).— GRISELDA FLORES

93. HARRY CHAPIN, “TAXI”

Make and Model: The big single off Chapin’s 1972 debut, Heads and Tales, made the album a hit and Chapin a folk star. A bittersweet, meandering tale of two mismatched people confronting the disappointments of life (“She was gonna be an actress/I was gonna learn to fly”), the six-minute-plus track — with dramatic cello and bass-player-singing-falsetto interludes — is anchored by Chapin’s expressive voice and natural raconteur skills.

Fuel Economy: Well, it’s a song about a taxi driver, that takes place in a taxi. But Chapin also manages to make the listener feel like they’re actually in the taxi with him, taking the long route home, watching driver Harry and mysterious passenger Sue catch up while simultaneously hearing their inner monologues.

Overdrive: There may always be a point in a Chapin song when you wonder “are we there yet?” — but stick it out for all six minutes and you’ll be rewarded with the sardonic wink of a final lyric summing up how Harry’s disappointment is at least a little more fun than Sue’s: “And here she’s acting happy inside her handsome home/ And me, I’m flying in my taxi/ Taking tips, and getting stoned.” — REBECCA MILZOFF

92. THURSDAY, “UNDERSTANDING IN A CAR CRASH”

Make and Model: The closest thing to a breakout hit ever enjoyed by New Jersey emo royals Thursday, 2001’s “Understanding in a Car Crash” is the exhilarating, terrifying sonic approximation of bracing for inevitable on-road impact.

Fuel Economy: Amidst so many scattered thoughts and so much shattered glass, the song’s jagged guitars and yelped lyrics hit with particular force because they remember to be as much about the understanding as the car crash, singer Geoff Rickly reaching the eye of the storm and queasily concluding, “I don’t want to feel this way forever.”

Overdrive: Not that the song really needed to spell out its title, but there’s still something incredibly satisfying and cathartic about the backing vocals rising at song’s climax to shout it out loud: “UNDERSTANDING! IN A CAR CRASH!” — A.U.

91. ELLIOTT MURPHY, “DRIVE ALL NIGHT”

Make and Model: A rapid-fire cascade of drums (credited to Phil Collins), a joyous Farfisa-style organ and a pledge of “true highway affection” crack open this overlooked gem from rocker Elliott Murphy’s 1977 album Just A Story From America, the fourth release from the singer/songwriter who deserved the complimentary comparisons to his pal Bruce Springsteen.

Fuel Economy: The song’s racing pace never lets up, as Murphy’s backing vocals and lyrics evoke the great pop car classics of Jan & Free YouTube Download 4.3.50 Crack + Serial Key Free 2021 and the Beach Boys.

Overdrive: “Now wait a minute!” shouts Murphy as the instruments drop back for a bridge, and the singer tells of a hot-wired escapade: “If your Daddy knew he’d kill/ `cause we just stole the keys to his brand new Coupe de Ville.” — THOM DUFFY

90. LUCINDA WILLIAMS, “CAR WHEELS ON A GRAVEL ROAD”

Make and Model: The 1998 title track from Williams’s fifth album takes listeners for a drive where Hank Williams plays on the radio, adults whisper in the front seats, and cotton fields stretch as far as the eye can see.

Fuel Economy: While the guitars and drums steadily chug and the chorus simply repeats the song’s title, the bright sound of the mando-guitar — half mandolin, half guitar — and the scenery Williams describes bust up the monotony of the ride.

Overdrive: Williams revealing that there’s a child in the backseat, unsure of the intention of the drive, adds an emotional depth to the upbeat track: “Child in the backseat about 4 or 5 years/ Lookin’ out the window/ Little bit of dirt mixed with tears/ Car wheels on a gravel road.” — CHRISTINE WERTHMAN

89. THE OFFSPRING, “BAD HABIT”

Make and Model: A violent, frenetic revenge fantasy, this deep cut off The Offspring’s 1994 pop-punk blockbuster Smash was the foul-mouthed favorite of every teenager still years several away from being eligible to experience the road rage described within.

Fuel Economy: “Bad Habit” certainly drives it like it talks it, switching from its foreboding, drumless intro into its breakneck-speed verses with enough whiplashing force to live up to its Auslogics BoostSpeed Premium 12.1.01 With Crack [Latest 2021] threats: “When I’m in my car, don’t gimme no crap/ ‘Coz the slightest thing and I just might snap!

Overdrive: The escalatingly profane scream-along bridge no doubt remains an absolute scourge to surviving ’90s parents nationwide: “You stupid, dumb s–t, GODD–N MOTHERF–KER!!!!” — A.U.

88. RUSH, “RED BARCHETTA”

Make and Model: This six-minute epic, inspired by a 1973 short story in Road & Track and recorded for Rush’s 1981 Moving Pictures album, sketches an entire story set in a dystopian, speedphobic future, in which the singer takes a train to his uncle’s country house to joyride illegally in “A brilliant red Barchetta/ From a better, vanished time.” The Barchetta — which means “small boat” in Italian, but here refers to a high-performance, open-top car — may not be economical, but the song’s lyrics are.

Fuel Economy: This isn’t about going for a ride, it’s about driving: adrenaline, “hot metal and oil,” and then – suddenly – a car chase.

Overdrive: The song speeds up as the Barchetta does – and both seem perilously close to spinning out of control. Then, in one final twist, the narrator ditches his pursuers, and calls it a day (“Race back to the farm/ To dream with my uncle at the fireside”). — ROB LEVINE

87. THREE 6 MAFIA FEAT. LIL FLIP, “RIDIN’ SPINNERS”

Make and Model: Coming off the dirty south assembly line in 2003 — one year after Lil’ Flip’s breakout “The Way We Ball” and three years before Three 6 Mafia became Oscar winners — “Ridin’ Spinners” is an earnest ode to spinner rims everywhere, from “the club parking lot [to] the expressway.”

Fuel Economy: Writing teachers often tell you to get as specific as possible to paint the most vivid picture, which is exactly what the Memphis mafia do on this slow-rolling banger that touches on the flex and the freedom of speeding along in a top-tier ride.

Overdrive: Either DJ Paul boasting “My rims so shiny they clear like flat-screen plasma” or Flip declaring, “We like our music slow, but our cars go faster.” — JOE LYNCH

86. QUEEN, “I’M IN LOVE WITH MY CAR”

Make and Model: Many rock songs in history have used cars as romantic stand-ins, but few have ever been as explicit about a very literal love between man and machine as this deep cut from Queen’s 1975 classic A Night at the Opera, written and sung by drummer Roger Taylor.

Fuel Economy: Though the song would eventually serve as a punchline in the band’s Bohemian Rhapsody biopic, it remains one of a real player named eazy a real player - Crack Key For U most enjoyably revved-up productions, with winkingly over-the-top lyrics that could probably have been recycled by Spinal Tap a decade later.

Overdrive: Few questionable rhymes ever forced into a love song have landed as deliciously as “Told my girl I’ll have to forget her/ Rather buy me a new carburetor!” — A.U.

85. CAKE, “THE DISTANCE”

Make and Model: Arguably Cake’s most enduring hit, 1996 breakout single “The Distance” rides a distorted guitar riff that pulses throughout the track, providing the perfect platform for lyrics that use the metaphor of a frantic car race.

Fuel Economy: “The Distance” is a perfect marriage of lyrics and music, each taking energy from the other as the track careens towards its IDM Crack 6.38 Build 14. It’s unclear whether the main character ever quite reaches his destination — but he’s going for speed, driving and striving as fast as he can nonetheless.

Overdrive: Midway through the song, the beat drops out, leaving just that driving guitar revving things back up for one final lap through the hook, breathlessly “racing and pacing and plotting the course.” — DAN RYS

84. JOHNNY PAYCHECK, “DRINKIN’ AND DRIVIN'” 

Make and Model: This 1980 ditty comes office 2007 download - Crack Key For U outlaw country singer and Grand Ole Opry member Johnny Paycheck, whose hard-charging life included a prison stint in the 1990s. The song’s message has not aged particularly well, considering how many people die each year in DUI-related accidents — but in Paycheck’s version, the only pain is the singer’s heartbreak, as he sits behind the wheel with one hand on the wheel and the other on a bottle of cheap wine.

Fuel Economy: Paycheck’s easygoing tenor and whiplash steel guitar deliver a non-stop bevy of automotive wordplay with a breezy cadence and easy-to-remember chorus — which always returns to “I’m gonna be drinkin’ and drivin’ that woman right off of my mind.”

Overdrive: Paycheck details how bad it’s gotten at the end of the song, with a little CB radio slang: “Breaker, Breaker, this is Heartache, now hear me loud and clear/ I got a memory on my tailgate, Lord, and old smokey’s on my rear.” (Smokey, a reference to the Smokey Bear campaign, is CB radio slang for a police car.) — DAVE BROOKS

83. METALLICA, “FUEL”

Make and Model: By the late ’90s, Metallica weren’t often making the same kind of road-ripping rave-ups they did in their thrashy early days — but they turned back the clock and cranked up the MPH for the blazing “Fuel.”

Fuel Economy: Such an obvious pedal-to-the-heavy-metal anthem that the music video pretty much had to be set amidst an old-school stock-car auto race, you really believe the stuff is frontman James Hetfield’s lifeblood when he begs, “Quench my thirrrrrst with GASOLIIIIIIIINE!”

Overdrive: No need for a starters’ pistol on this one, you’re off and running with Hetfield’s classic a cappella opening: “GIMME FUEL, GIMME FIRE, GIMME THAT WHICH I DESIRE!” — A.U.

82. INCUBUS, “DRIVE”

Make and Model: Serving as the California rock band’s lone top 10 hit on the Hot 100, Incubus’ “Drive” reached No. 9 in summer 2001. On the acoustic-driven track, frontman Brandon Boyd isn’t so much taking control of the wheel literally as he it is wrestling it away from his fear, and ultimately finding open road ahead after doing so. 

Fuel Economy: It’s no secret that the best songs to listen to in the car are the ones when everyone can belt out the chorus together. “Drive” provides that in droves — and while we endorse keeping open eyes, we’d suggest transitioning those open arms to grasp the steering wheel. 

Overdrive: Before launching into the pre-chorus for a second time, Boyd asks “Will I choose water over wine/ And hold my own and drive?” before letting out a soaring, wordless “ohhh-ohh-ohhhh.” — JOSH GLICKSMAN

81. THE CLASH, “BRAND NEW CADILLAC”

Make and Model: This 1979 punk belter is The Clash’s take on a 1959 rock’n’roll b-side from Vince Taylor and his Playboys. Joe Strummer’s angst is palpable as his lady pulls up in a fancy new ride just to tell him to piss off. 

Fuel Economy: The song quickly shifts gears from the singer’s excitement that his love is pulling up in a beautiful new Cadillac, to him screaming after her as she leaves him in the dust. 

Overdrive: Strummer can barely contain his emotions as he shouts to his baby, “Jesus Christ, where’d you get that Cadillac?” — TAYLOR MIMS

80. SAMMY HAGAR, “I CAN’T DRIVE 55”

Make and Model: Supposedly inspired by an upstate speeding ticket and a rejoinder offered by the Red Rocker to the officer who pulled him over, Sammy Hagar’s signature solo hit remains a classic anthem for irresponsible rubber-burners.

Fuel Economy: With synths and guitars firing in the background, Hagar offers his impassioned defense like an arena-rock Jean Valjean, making a semi-legitimate case that to deny his need for speed would be a much truer crime than any on-road infractions.

Overdrive: Those pained pauses in the song’s fist-pumping refrain: “I… CAN’T… DRIVE…. FIFTY-FIVE!!!” — A.U.

79. SNIFF ‘N’ THE TEARS, “DRIVER’S SEAT”

Make and Model: The lone hit for Sniff ‘n’ the Tears assured the British rock outfit a permanent place in late-’70s pop culture thanks to its pensive keyboards, growling guitars and alternately dreamy and anxious vocals.

Fuel Economy: With tensely shifting drums and somewhat narratively ambiguous lyrics, “Driver’s Seat” carries the mysterious, anxious allure of a late-night drive where you’re not totally sure what awaits you at your destination — you can almost feel the nervous, exciting tapping on the steering wheel.

Overdrive: The song really reaches fourth gear when everything drops out but those insistent drums and harmonized backing vocals, intoning over and over: “Driver’s seat…. AH-WOO….” — A.U.

78. IGGY POP, “THE PASSENGER”

Make and Model: A garage rock rumination with an irresistibly shambolic riff and sing-song chorus, “The Passenger” was Iggy Pop’s diary of his many hours spent riding shotgun with David Bowie, who produced the parent album, 1977’s Lust for Life.

Fuel Economy: Existing between the reckless abandon of the Stooges and the weary alienation of his solo debut The Idiot, “The Passenger” taps into the romantic solitude of two people driving for seemingly endless miles, gradually dissociating from the world as they lock into a tandem groove.

Overdrive: Just before motoring off into the sunset, Pop drops this beautiful couplet about watching the world from the highway: “All of it is yours and mine / So let’s ride and ride and ride and ride.” — J.L.

77. E-40 FEAT. KEAK DA SNEAK, “TELL ME WHEN TO GO”

Make and Model: E-40 was already a rap legend by the time he made his Warner Bros. Records debut with 2006’s My Ghetto Report Card, but this lead single — which later got an all-star remix from Kanye NovaBACKUP 19.3 Crack - Crack Key For U, Ice Cube and The Game — marked a moment in the sun for the Bay Area’s hyphy scene.

Fuel economy: A crunk crossover produced by Lil Jon, “Tell Me When to Go” was much leaner than the ATL superproducer’s juggernaut anthems of the early 2000s — but that incessant kick drum still hits with all the heft windows movie maker 2019 email and registration code - Activators Patch a slammed car door. Regardless, the enduring stars here are Keak da Sneak’s cartoonish rasp and the ingeniously simple hook that’s anything but dumb, dumb, dumb.

Overdrive: The call-and-response breakdown that taught the world how to ghost ride the whip. — NOLAN FEENEY

76. JOHN TRAVOLTA, “GREASED LIGHTNIN'”

Make and Model: Part of the soundtrack to the classic 1978 film musical Grease and performed by starring actor John Travolta, “Greased Lightnin’” hit No. 47 on the Hot 100 that same year.

Fuel Economy: Few tracks scream “song about cars” like this one, which references everything from four-barrel quads to a palomino dashboard, and was written for a moment in the film about fixing up a vehicle for an upcoming drag race — and to, of course, woo women.

Overdrive: “Greased Lightnin’” opens at its peak, when Travolta declares: Antivirus - Crack All Windows/Mac OS Software Full Version, this car is automatic, it’s systematic, it’s hyyyyydromatic,” with horn flares in between each statement, before announcing with overflowing excitement, “Why it’s Greased Lightning!” — LYNDSEY HAVENS

75. SHERYL CROW, “EVERYDAY IS A WINDING ROAD”

Make and Model: Sheryl Crow’s 1997 pop-rock hit is equal parts existential journey and laid-back joyride – kind of like life.

Fuel Economy: This follows the car-song road map to a T, thanks to a chorus that’s meant to be yelled out of a top-down convertible and an upbeat production that makes you want to drive a little too fast. It wasn’t just destined to be in a car commercial; it is a car commercial.

Overdrive: As she cruises down the winding road of life, Crow wonders if “all the things I’ve seen were ever real, were ever really happening?” Who knows? Just keep driving. — KATIE ATKINSON

74. ROBERT JOHNSON, “TERRAPLANE BLUES”

Make and Model: In 1936, when Johnson first recorded this blues song that takes its title from a car made by the Hudson Motor Company, automotive double entendres were still relatively new – but, then again, so was driving itself. Here, though, Johnson is stalled: “You know, the coils ain’t even buzzin’,” he laments. “The little generator won’t get the spark.”

Fuel Economy: As the song goes along, Johnson reveals that someone’s been driving his Terraplane “since I been gone.” The lyrics resonate with raw emotion — he’s Norton Antivirus Plus Crack to weep and moan. He does have insurance, though, in the form of “a woman that I’m lovin’, way down in Arkansas.”

Overdrive: Most great driving songs are about the freedom of the road, but this one, like a few of Johnson’s songs, is about the poison of jealousy. “Please,” he sings, “don’t block the road.” — R.L.

73. DAVE DUDLEY, “SIX DAYS ON THE ROAD”

Make and Model: One of the classic old-school trucker anthems, “Six Days on the Road” — made famous by country singer Dave Dudley in 1963 —  commemorated the grind of load-hauling across the country, dodging cops and downing “little white pills” and doing whatever it takes to make it home ASAP.

Fuel Economy: Among the least-glamorous driving songs of all time, “Six Days” doesn’t celebrate the road so much as present it as an obstacle course, full of pratfalls to be avoided and short cuts to be taken if you know the lay of the land well enough — a wearying life, but one well-observed enough to have its own sort of worn-in, hard-earned dignity.

Overdrive: A song this Amiti Antivirus Crack 25.0.810 & Product Key [Latest] 2021 in the drudgery doesn’t have a lot of major highs, but you gotta smile for Dudley a little when he finally reaches his destination in the final verse: “My hometown’s a-comin’ in sight/ If you think I’m happy, you’re right.” — A.U.

72. KISS, “DETROIT ROCK CITY”

Make and Model: Kiss’ car-crash rager became a fan favorite and eventual FM rock standard following its 1976 release, though it only ever charted on the Hot 100 once it was re-released as the B-side to the band’s a real player named eazy a real player - Crack Key For U ballad “Beth,” a surprise top 10 hit that December.

Fuel Economy: Few songs about road fatality have ever been as unapologetically feel-good as “Detroit Rock City,” a song whose excitement over blasting the radio while driving to a concert can’t even be slowed down by oncoming truck headlights — with singer Paul Stanley simply smirking, “I gotta laugh ‘coz I know I’m gonna die.”

Overdrive: The double-tracked guitar interlude, gaining intensity over Peter Criss’ galloping drums, as (appropriately) thrilling and foreboding an instrumental break as you’ll hear in classic rock. — A.U.

71. ACE HOOD FEAT. FUTURE, “BUGATTI” 

Make and Model: Florida rapper Ace Hood merged into mainstream consciousness — and onto the Hot 100 — with his menacing 2013 trap anthem about the material perks of success, from watches to women to the song’s titular luxury ride.

Fuel Economy: From Mike WiLL Made It’s hyper-layered production to Future’s sing-song pre-chorus, a larger-than-life feature from Rick Ross and Hood’s own rapid-fire verses, this song takes on different speeds with the fluidity of an expertly handled manual transmission.

Overdrive: While waking up in one’s car isn’t necessarily a write-home-about accomplishment, the song’s explosive shout-along chorus — “I woke up in the new Bugatti!!” — is used more metaphorically to express the thrill of coming up so hard (and so overnight) that you can suddenly afford a car whose base model retails for $1.7 million. — KATIE BAIN

70. OMC, “HOW BIZARRE” 

Make and Model: New Zealand’s Otara Millionaires Club had their lone international hit in 1997 with “How Bizarre,” a surreal road odyssey in which the group gets pulled over by the cops, stops for gas, runs into a traveling circus and then speeds away from all the fracas — with only the titular two-word summary to tie it all together.

Fuel Economy: The lyrics might not make a ton of sense on paper, but they add up to the kind of road trip adventure that bonds a group of friends together because it could never make sense to anyone who wasn’t there — and that title and accompanying guitar cascade is all the explanation anyone else really needs, anyway.

Overdrive: After having related enough of his travels with Brother Pele and Sister Zina, frontman Pauly Fuemana declares it’ll cost extra for you to find out their journey’s end: “Wanna know the rest? Hey — buy the rights!” — A.U.

69. PEARL JAM, “REARVIEWMIRROR”

Make and Model: Such a fan favorite of an album cut that it became the title of Pearl Jam’s greatest hits album two decades later, “RVM” takes a traveling guitar riff from frontman Eddie Vedder and follows it along through its highway metaphor to an angsty — this was early-1990s grunge, after all — and grand conclusion.

Fuel Economy: From its opening lyric (“I took a drive today/ Time to emancipate”) to the wide-eyed visual of its hook (“Saw things so much clearer/ Once you were in my rear view mirror”), Vedder combines both the tensions of trying to overcome obstacles in life with the freedom of finally achieving it and speeding away into the distance.

Fourth Gear: With the song picking up intensity and the drums getting louder and more frantic, Vedder leans into a final bridge with one last release and an epic scream, “REAR VIEW MIRRORRRRR” that, when performed live, never fails to bring the house down. — DAN RYS

68. RICKIE LEE JONES, “THE LAST CHANCE TEXACO”

Make and Model: The Grammy-nominated 1979 ballad uses a lonely filling station on the outskirts of town as an allegory for settling for what’s available to you, whether it’s a relationship or a conveniently located gas pump.

Fuel Economy: The strummy number is packed with so many automotive metaphors (“her plug’s disconnected, she gets scared and she stalls,” “her timing’s all wrong,” “she can’t idle this long,” “turn her over and go,” etc.) that Rickie should consider a retirement job as a Car and Driver writer.

Overdrive: But of all the song’s metaphors, none gets more mileage than the supercharged verse that incorporates no less than four gas station company names: “Well, he tried to be Standard and he tried to be Mobil/ He tried living in a World and in a Shell.” — K.A.

67. M83, “MIDNIGHT CITY” 

Make and Model: The 2011 smash hit doesn’t offer an abundance of lyrics, but the few key lines detail (and were inspired by) a sort of backseat wonder at a sprawling metropolis viewed through car windows — though its ethereal synth pop feel and roaring saxophone to close implores listeners to refrain from “waiting” for anything, regardless of what M83’s Anthony Gonzalez says. 

Fuel Economy: Save the track’s closing minute for the time on your drive when the city’s lights shine the brightest. The very moment that saxophone kicks in, a wave of euphoria will wash over you – it’s a feeling that few songs from the past decade have been able to so prominently capture. Make sure to crank the stereo. 

Overdrive: Have we mentioned the song’s outro yet?  — J.G.

66. SELENA, “LA CARCACHA”

Make and Model: Selena Quintanilla dropped “La Carcacha” in 1992, and it would become one of the most emblematic songs of her career. Co-produced by her brother A.B. Quintanilla III and Skype 8.72.76.29 Crack+ License Key 2021 - Free Activators Silvetti, the track showcased just exactly how Selena y Los Dinos were revolutionizing the Tejano music industry in the ‘90s, fusing traditional cumbia, tejano, alternative rock melodies, and even incorporating car honks in the track.

Fuel Economy: If the “beep beep” throughout the track is any indication, this is the ultimate Latin pop car song. But above that, it’s the humble lyrics that make it 100 percent relatable for fans: Selena sings about getting made fun of because she’s dating a guy with a broken-down car. She comes to his defense saying that despite his old car with tailpipe smoke, tricycle-like wheels, and backward engine, her boyfriend is faithful and treats her like a queen.

Overdrive: For the most part, this track keeps everyone on their feet from beginning to end — but it’s the song’s first 30 seconds that really became a fan-favorite — especially during the TikTok era, with the countdown (“uno, dos, tres, cuatro”) and upbeat production getting users of all ages to imitate Selena’s arm-swaying and hip-shaking dance moves. — JESSICA ROIZ

65. TIM MCGRAW, “RED RAGTOP” 

Make and Model: McGraw poignantly delivers the rare country song to address abortion (though the word is never mentioned) from 2002’s Tim McGraw and the Dancehall Doctors.

Fuel Economy: The full-circle details of McGraw’s relationship are devastating: He was 20, she was 18 when they first made love in his “red ragtop” — which he later explains is the same car he drove to take her for her abortion, and the same car where he reveals “she stopped loving me.”

Overdrive: Though he never specifies the make of his car, years later, the protagonist stops at a red light and beside him is a young woman with the same green eyes as his teenage sweetheart in a Cabriolet, as he realizes there’s no going back: “Well, you do what you do and you pay for your sins/ And there’s no such thing as what might have been.” — M. Newman

64. MISSY ELLIOTT, “THE RAIN (SUPA DUPA FLY)” 

Make and Model: Missy’s Ann Peebles-reinventing 1997 breakthrough hit introduced the world to one of pop music’s new larger-than-life figures, the rapper-singer cruising into the mainstream with writer/producer buddy Timbaland in the passenger seat.

Fuel Economy: “The Rain” features verses of Missy observing the titular weather nastiness through her home window while smoking weed, and sitting on a hill undeterred as it starts falling on her umbrella — but in between, she takes a memorable drive to the beach, maintaining her way through what looks like an oncoming downpour.

Overdrive: “Beep beep, who got that keys to my jeep?/ VRRRRRRRRRMMM” — simply one of the most memorable (and oft-quoted) car lyrics in hip-hop history. — A.U.

63. JAN & DEAN, “DEAD MAN’S CURVE”

Make and Model: This song about a street race that ended in tragedy became the duo’s fourth top 10 hit on the Hot 100 in May 1964 — score one for the Americans amid the British Invasion. The duo’s Jan Berry co-wrote the song and produced and arranged the single under Lou Adler’s supervision.

Fuel Economy: The song mentions the names of actual streets you’ll encounter cruising down Sunset Blvd. in Los Angeles, adding extra real-life gravity to the California cautionary tale.

Overdrive: The spoken word interlude in which singer Dean Torrence, post-crash, tells a doctor, “Well, the last thing I remember doc, I started to swerve …” Eerily, in April 1966, Berry was involved in near-fatal collision near the spot depicted in the song. – PAUL GREIN 

62. DOOBIE BROTHERS, “ROCKIN’ DOWN THE HIGHWAY” 

Make and Model: Few things go as well together as rock’n’roll and the open highway, and this album cut off the sophomore release from the original Doobie Brothers takes that simple formula and distills it into its purest form with this song’s hook: “Woahh, rockin’ down the highway!” Chef’s kiss.

Fuel Economy: The song is an ode to speed, with lyrics that propel each verse directly towards where it needs to be: the unbridled release of the hook. There’s nothing overly complicated or even particularly inventive or witty about the song, but that’s not the point — the point is to go faster, outrun the cops, and just keep it moving.

Overdrive: Besides the obvious, the song’s best part is the pre-chorus, which underlines the manic energy that the song exudes: “Can’t stop, and I can’t stop/ Got to keep on movin’ or I’ll lose my mind!” — D.R.

61. TRAE THE TRUTH FEAT. FAT PAT & BIG HAWK, “SWANG” 

Make and Model: Released in 2005 when he was still known just as “Trae,” the booming “Swang” never charted nationally, but became an enduring local anthem in the rapper’s Houston hometown.

Fuel Economy: Most great car songs make your foot heavier on the gas pedal, but “Swang” turns the open road into a school zone with its slow-and-low groove, making anyone going over 25 look like Mario Andretti.

Overdrive: The trunk-popping legacy of “Swang” was borrowed in large part from its late featured guest Fat Pat, whose verse on DJ DMD’s “25 Lighters” offered the song its classic screwed-and-chopped chorus, and who guest rapper Big Hawk shouts out on his own verse: “I’m Fat Pat’s clone, his legacy carries on/ His heartbeat pumps through my flesh and bone.” — A.U.

60. EDDIE RABBIT, “DRIVIN’ MY LIFE AWAY” 

Make and Model: Country singer Eddie Rabbitt found crossover success with this jaunty rockabilly jam featured in the 1980 movie Roadie, which starred Meat Loaf and included the tagline, “The bands make it rock, but the roadies make it roll.”

Fuel Economy: Whether you’re a trucker, a roadie or just someone logging hours behind the wheel, “Drivin’” turns your slog of a drive into a bouncy quest for a sunny day.

Overdrive: Rabbitt reaching that rare moment of car-and-tune synchronicity: “Those windshield wipers slapping out a tempo/Keeping perfect rhythm with the song on the radio.” — C.W.

59. RADIOHEAD, “AIRBAG”

Make and Model: Kicking off their 1997 post-Britpop masterpiece OK Computer, Radiohead’s “Airbag” finds lead singer Thom Yorke in a mess of pre-millennial anxieties, with his recurringfear of cars reappearing at the song’s core.

FuelEconomy: A jarring sonic melange of twinkling sleigh bells, sawing cello riffs and guitars that are equally majestic and nauseous-sounding, the non-fatal lyrical crash of “Airbag” resonates because the music sounds as simultaneously rattled and relieved as Yorke himself.

Overdrive: “In a fast German car/ I’m amazed that I survived/ An airbag saved my life,” the frontman proclaims — an obviously life-affirming moment that still quickly gives way to an uneasy sensation of “Now what?” — A.U.

58. MAREN MORRIS, “’80S MERCEDES”

Make and Model: This fun-loving track, which Morris co-wrote with the late busbee, arrived as the second single off her 2016 full-length debut album, Hero. 

Fuel Economy: Morris manages to make a song about a car from a time before she was born feel entirely her own, with lines like “She ain’t made for practicality/ Yeah, I guess she’s just like me.” Plus, with details peppered throughout like the hula girl on the dash, fans could easily imagine an accompanying visual without ever seeing cleanmymac cracked music video.

Overdrive: The song’s early chorus — “Feel like a hard-to-get starlet when I’m driving” — evokes such a visceral liberation and perfectly sets up the Instagram-caption-ready climax that repeats: “I’m a ’90s baby/ In my ’80s Mercedes.” — L.H.

57. DEPECHE MODE, “BEHIND THE WHEEL”

Make and Model: The third single off the synth-rock band’s platinum-selling 1987 release Music For the Masses, the dark tune sees frontman Dave Gahan ceding control for ultimate pleasure.

Fuel Economy: The Anton Corbijn-directed video may offer a throwback to the same BMW Isetta that was featured in “Never Let Me Down Again,” but the vehicle this song conjures is sleeker and dirtier — and we mean that in the best way — as Gahan’s low voice revs with desire for his “little girl” to “do what you want.”

Overdrive: Is there such a thing as *under*drive? Because Gahan’s yearning for submission is palpable from the outset: “My little girl, drive anywhere/ Do what you want, I don’t care/ Tonight, I’m in the hands of fate/ I hand myself over on a plate now.” — ANNA CHAN

56. JERRY REED, “EAST BOUND AND DOWN”

Make and Model: Few songs can summarize an entire film in just a few verses like “East Bound and Down,” the fast-paced, banjo heavy hit for the bootlegging blockbuster Smokey and the Bandit — with Reed in a starring role aside Burt Reynolds and Sally Field.

Fuel Economy: You don’t have to know CB radio lingo to understand this rollicking track, which is filled with trucker references like “Ole Smokeys got them ears on” — meaning then police are listening for chatter on the airwaves — while “East Bound and Down” is a popular sign for drivers meaning they’re no longer transmitting, but likely still listening as they pull over for a brief rest.

Overdrive: The song’s stakes are set from the opening stanza: “The boys are thirsty in Atlanta / And there’s beer in Texarkana / And we’ll bring it back no matter what it takes.” — D.B.

55. BEYONCÉ, “PARTITION”

Make and Model: Acting as the back-half of “Yonce” from Beyonce’s 2013 self-titled album, “Partition” does not a real player named eazy a real player - Crack Key For U the brakes while detailing the Queen’s fantasies of having sex with her husband Jay-Z in the back of a limousine on the way to the club — one the occupied couple doesn’t really plan on making it into. 

Fuel Economy: With the sound of a car window rolling up to signal the transition from “Yonce” to “Partition,” the subsequent synth arrangements sound like the limo zooming through the city while capturing the thrill of Bey and Jay’s own wild ride in the back seat. 

Overdrive: The Queen’s alter-ego ordering her limo driver not to watch any of the action: “Driver, roll up the partition, please/ I don’t need you seeing ‘Yonce on her knees.” — HERAN MAMO

54. THE SMITHS, “THERE IS A LIGHT THAT NEVER GOES OUT”

Make and Model: A classic moper from Moz and company off their iconic 1986 album The Queen is Dead, in which the eternally glum singer pines to go out and see people and live the life of a care-free joy rider.

Fuel Economy: The acoustic reverie with dramatic strings not only muses about being in a car to nowhere, but it doubles down on its auto-erotic fantasy when Morrissey dreams about him and his lover being wiped out on the road together.

Overdrive: If you think there’s anything on Earth more romantic than the line, “And if a 10-ton truck/ Kills the both of us/ To die by your side/ Well, the pleasure, the privilege is mine,” we don’t know what to tell you. — GIL Driver easy pro download. RONNY AND THE DAYTONAS, “G.T.O.”

Make and Model: Written and performed by John Wilkin, this surf rock number pays a real player named eazy a real player - Crack Key For U to America’s favorite muscle car, the Pontiac GTO, which could “turn it on, wind it up (and) blow it out” with an engine growl that could be heard from blocks away.

Fuel Economy: The 1964 track, released just one year after the GM vehicle debuted on U.S. streets, was written by a teenage Wilkin and recorded with Nashville producer Bill Justis and session players — but still captured enough on-road giddiness with its verse ravings and wordless “wah-wah” chorus to hit No. 4 on the Hot 100 that September.

Overdrive: Wilkin shows off his car knowledge in the opening lyrics, hailing the cars “three deuces and a four-speed / and a three-eighty-nine.” The three deuces were a reference to the GTO’s unique three double-barreled carburetors, four speed described the car’s transmission while three-eighty-nine was a nod to the V8 engine’s large size, measuring 389 cubic-inches. — D.B.

52. KANYE WEST FEAT. PAUL WALL & GLC, “DRIVE SLOW”

Make and Model: Released as a late single from Kanye West’s second studio album, Late Registration, “Drive Slow” featuring Paul Wall and GLC is a warning tale to anyone who might think it’s cool to live life in the fast lane.

Fuel Economy: “Drive Slow” is the perfect song for a late-night car ride, with its slow groove and deep nostalgic narrative that delivers a word to the wise about resisting temptation — on the road and elsewhere.

Overdrive: Kanye dominates the proceedings with one line of advice that defines the song, “Don’t rush to get grown, drive slow homie.” — D.A.

51. ARETHA FRANKLIN, “FREEWAY OF LOVE”

Make and Model: This typing master lifetime free download - Free Activators reached No. 3 on the Hot 100 in August 1985, becoming Franklin’s highest-charting hit in more than a decade. The Queen was 43 when the song was released, not too old to put the top down and go cruising – in more ways than one. “How’d you get your pants so tight?” is a come-on line for the ages.

Fuel Economy: The song, produced by Narada Michael Walden, has that mid-’80s top 40 radio sound, and Clarence Clemons’ sax solo adds fire — but there’s not one moment where Franklin is not firmly in the driver’s seat.

Overdrive: On the line “City traffic moving way too slow/Drop your pedal and go,” Franklin gets more mileage out of the word “drop” than any other singer could have. Another nice touch: The license plate on Franklin’s pink Cadillac in the video reads: “RESPECT.” – P.G. 

50. THE BEACH BOYS, “FUN, FUN, FUN”

Make and Model: With its “Johnny B. Goode“-inspired electric guitar intro and lyrics about blowing off the library to go cruising, The Beach Boys’ 1964 hit is sonically and lyrically synonymous with the easygoing West Coast aesthetic.

Fuel Economy: In Southern California, the lure of ditching school for the beach and burgers is a constant temptation for licensed teens. “Fun, Fun, Fun” zeroes in on that unique balance between work and fun that so many Golden State high schoolers try and fail to achieve.

Overdrive: There’s only one way to listen to this song, and it’s by driving down Pacific Coast Highway with the radio blasting, sunroof open, and a bag of In-N-Out strapped to your front seat — with the song’s “Well she got her daddy’s car/ And she cruised through the hamburger stand now” opening lines ringing in your ears for the full effect. — MIA NAZARENO

49. NIO GARCIA x BRRAY x JUANKA x ANUEL AA x MYKE TOWERS, “LA JEEPETA” (REMIX)

Make and Model: In early 2020, Puerto Rican artist Nio Garcia teamed a real player named eazy a real player - Crack Key For U with Brray and Juanka to unleash the catchy mid-tempo reggaetón single “La Jeepeta.” But it was the remix, aided by Anuel AA and Myke Towers, that ignited its success on the charts; while the original failed to secure a spot on Hot Latin Songs, the remix peaked at No. 3 in August.

Fuel Economy: Built around slang for an SUV truck or Jeep, with raunchy lyrics and a bounce perfect for large-vehicle travel, the song was met with skepticism from Garcia’s team — but he insisted it was destined for big things. “From the day the intro and the chorus were created, I knew this song was going to be a hit,” Garcia told Billboard last July.

Overdrive: The chorus lyrics are particularly graphic: “Getting high in the jeep/ Next to me I have a blonde [girl] with big boobs/ She wants me to put it in.”  But that seems to be part of its appeal: Most of the 1.6 million Jeepeta dances on YouTube, for example, have both men and women making the universal gestures to describe big boobs or having intercourse. — J.R.

48. DEEP PURPLE, “HIGHWAY STAR”

Make and Model: Opener to classic rock virtuosos Deep Purple’s 1972 signature set Machine Head, “Highway Star” rides a mix of adrenaline and ego as singer Ian Gillian sounds equally in love with his car, his girl and himself over his band’s intoxicating open-road motoring.

Fuel Economy: “Highway Star” quite simply goes for it, with a full-band commitment to playing harder, faster and longer than their peers, and ending up with a blazing track quite worthy of the “killer machine” the song celebrates.

Overdrive: The song’s instrumental intro builds to such a memorable fever pitch, with Gillian’s falsetto wail coming in over the top of the band’s heavy chugging, that it was used as the opening music for the Rock Band video game. — A.U.

47. CALVIN HARRIS FEAT. FUTURE & KHALID, “ROLLIN”

Make and Model: “Rollin” helped roll out Harris’ 2017 album Funk Wav Bounces Vol. 1 as its third single, with Khalid and Future’s featured vocals about leaving a soon-to-be-ex in their rearview riding the cruise-controlled wave of the Red Giant Shooter Suite 13.2.12 Crack With Product Key Free 2020 looped synth-funk beat.

Fuel Economy: Khalid and Future’s anecdotes about their past relationships certify going for a drive as the prime antidote for having too much on one’s mind, making the track a perfect road trip playlist addition. 

Overdrive: Khalid’s chorus setting the tone for the need for speed: “I’ve been rollin’ on the freeway/ I’ve been riding 85/ I’ve been thinking way too much/ And I’m way too gone to drive.” — H.M.

46. 2PAC, “PICTURE ME ROLLIN'” 

Make and Model: On this fan favorite from the 1996 All Eyez on Me double album, a fresh-out-of-jail 2Pac wants everyone to forget about all his problems and just picture him rollin’ in his Mercedes.

Fuel Economy: This is the ultimate carefree car song, from a man who had plenty to care about. But with haters and critics everywhere, he wanted all his enemies to see just how blessed (not stressed) he was, over laid-back drums and guitar pops that certainly aided his demonstration.

Overdrive: In the song’s unforgettably DGAF outro, Pac has one message for all his haters, including the prison he was just bailed out of, “all you punk police” and the DA who charged him: “Any time y’all wanna see me again, rewind this track right here, close your eyes, and picture me rollin’.” — K.A.

45. CARRIE UNDERWOOD, “BEFORE HE CHEATS”

Make and Model: Underwood was fresh off her 2005 American Idol win when she released her debut album Some Hearts, whose third single “Before He Cheats” became a massive crossover hit — hitting No. 1 on Hot Country Songs, No. 8 on the Hot 100, winning Grammys for best female country vocal performance and best country song and entering the canon of all-time karaoke classics.

Fuel Economy: This pop/country anthem runs on sweet revenge. The fantasy of taking a baseball bat to your cheating lover’s precious ride is popular among those of us who’ve ever been romantically scorned, but what’s just as delicious here is the seething, sarcastic contempt Underwood expresses for both him and the “bleached-blond tramp” he’s got in the passenger’s seat.

Overdrive: Underwood doesn’t stop with just taking “a Louisville Slugger to both headlights,” instead further demonstrating that hell hath no fury by keying his “pretty little souped-up four-wheel drive,” carving her name into his leather seats and, to really bring her point home — and to make sure he doesn’t get back to his — slashing all four tires. — K.B.

44. A TRIBE CALLED QUEST, “I LEFT MY WALLET IN EL SEGUNDO”

Make and Model: “I Left My Wallet in El Segundo” is a storytelling saga of an inconvenient mishap in the midst of an impromptu vacation, taken from NY rap greats A Tribe Called Quest’s 1990 debut album, People’s Instinctive Travels and the Paths of Rhythm. 

Fuel Economy: Q-Tip flexes his anecdotal skills throughout the breezy, playful track, which depicts a cross-country road trip with Ali, Jarobi and Phife Dawg from Brooklyn, New York to El Segundo, California in a ‘74 Dodge Dart.

Overdrive: With a story that’s completely mapped out from beginning to end, listeners can’t miss any of the detours that take place on this musical adventure from the Tribe. — D.A.

43. JOHNNY CASH, “I’VE BEEN EVERYWHERE” 

Make and Model: This well-traveled travelogue was written in 1958 by Australian country singer Geoff Mack and popularized in 1962 by another Aussie performer Lucky Starr (Leslie William Morrison). Many covers have followed, but Cash’s version, recorded with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers for the Man in Black’s 1996 Unchained album, is the one that’s ingrained in 21st century pop culture — thanks to its use in episodes of The Simpsons and Family Guy, a Choice Hotels commercial and at least two films.

Fuel Economy: While the only vehicle mentioned is “a semi with a high and canvas-covered load,” the song racks up mileage faster than a Ferrari. In a little over three minutes, Cash cites 90 states, cities, towns and countries while backed by Petty and Co.’s Bakersfield country-rock vibe. A website that maps all of the destinations calculates a total distance traveled of almost 108,425 miles.

Overdrive: The first verse finds the singer hitchhiking in Winnemucca, Nevada, a town that, in 2020, had a population of less than 7,800 people. When he jumps in the semi cab, the driver asks him, “if I’d seen a road with DiskInternals Raid Recovery Registration key much dust and sand.” Cash’s assured response is “Listen, I’ve traveled every road in this here land!” –F.D.

42. MIKE JONES FEAT. SLIM THUG & PAUL WALL, “STILL TIPPIN'” 

Make and Model: A mid-’00s single that helped put Houston hip-hop on the national map and make stars out of its three performers, “Still Tippin” had kids across the country bragging about “tippin’ on fo’ fos, wrapped in fo’ Vogues” even if they had no clue about the rims and tires those chorus lyrics actually referred to.

Fuel Economy: The song’s narcotic crawl lets you know just how differently they do it in H-Town, but the song’s dark beauty and bottomless supply of cool makes it an exhilarating ride even when it’s coasting in neutral.

Overdrive: Paul Wall’s claim to having “the Internet going nuts” has proven the song’s most enduring lyric, but its finest car couplet remains Mike Jones’ boast “Catch me lane switchin’ with the paint drippin’/ Turn your neck and your dame missin’.” — A.U.

41. TOM PETTY, “RUNNIN’ DOWN A DREAM”

Make and Model: Tom Petty’s solo debut sans Heartbreakers, 1989’s Full Moon Fever, was mostly memorable for its lush acoustic rock and breezy Jeff Lynne production — but he still plugged in and riffed out for the piston-churning  “Runnin’ Down a Dream,” a guitar mini-epic custom designed for classic rock radio.

Fuel Economy: For as action-packed as the song sounds, not much actually happens in its lyrics: Tom sings along to “Runaway” on the radio, puts on cruise control for a while, then speeds back up again. But it still feels Homeric, since the real narrative is all happening in Petty’s head — as is the case with anyone on the road working on their own mystery, and following wherever it leads.

Overdrive: That climactic solo, man. Shout out to Mike Campbell. — A.U.

40. BILLY OCEAN, “GET OUTTA MY DREAMS, GET INTO MY CAR”

Make and Model: The British/Trinidadian singer scored his third U.S. No. 1 Billboard 200 hit with this 1988 song in which he begs a woman to… well, the title says it all.

Fuel Economy: The super-’80s pop tune tries to make an unprompted backseat invitation sound like a winning lottery ticket, and comes shockingly close to succeeding. Featured in the legendary Corey and Corey (Haim and Feldman) film License to Drive, the song was also accompanied by a then-ground-breaking video that mixed footage of Ocean driving a variety of slick rides through a car wash, with animation of fish and boom box-wielding ducks.

Overdrive: The lascivious lyrics would probably not pass muster today, but you kind of have to chuckle at the iconic pick-up line: “Lady driver let me take your wheel/ Smooth operator/ Touch my bumper/ Hey, let’s make a deal/ Make it real.” — G.K.

39. LUDACRIS FEAT. MYSTIKAL & I-20, “MOVE B—H” 

Make and Model: Luda power steered into the top 10 of the Hot 100 for the first time with “Move B—h,” the fourth single from his 2001 LP, Word of Mouf.

Fuel Economy: An almost cartoonishly ominous singalong classic for anyone who came of age in the early 2000s, “”Move B—h” is equal parts road rage and precision driving. Luda — along with guest stars Mystikal and I-20 — careens past “all the groupies and gold diggers” and other sundry haters, threatening that these bystanders “about to get ran the f–k over” while he maneuvers towards a stage where the spotlight is as glaring as his brights.

Overdrive: Ludacris compares the power, velocity and general unstoppability of his career to doing a hundred on the highway, emphasizing his intent to take no prisoners by adding that, “if you do the speed limit, get the f–k outta my way!” — K.B.

38. TAYLOR SWIFT, “GETAWAY CAR”

Make and Model: While memories of Taylor Swift’s Reputation era are often eclipsed by the rebrand into her edgier, more dangerous alter ego, the pop star’s songwriting about a dramatic love triangle on 2017’s “Getaway Car” (which she co-wrote Jack Antonoff) remains a standout track — one that we regularly revisit four years after its debut.

Fuel Economy: You haven’t lived until you’ve looked your partner in crime in the eye and said, “Let’s run away together.” “Getaway Car” captures that fantasy of escaping — even if you are taking a shortcut through a doomed relationship. Lyrically and visually, Swift’s singing of “When he was running after us, I was screaming ‘Go, go, go!'” invites us into her backseat as she makes a run for it.

Overdrive: Taylor reveals it all in the bridge when she sings in hushed tones, “I’m in a getaway car/ I left you in the motel bar/ Put the money in the bag and stole the keys/ That was the last time you ever saw me” before she revs the engine to the chorus back up. The plot twist of leaving both lovers in the end is the song’s power move, and one that’ll help keep Reputation relevant during future Taylor Swift eras to come. — M. Nazareno

37. THE WALLFLOWERS, “ONE HEADLIGHT”

Make and Model: The 1997 hit may not have charted on the Hot 100 due to eligibility rules at the time, but the song frontman Jakob Dylan says is about “perseverance” nevertheless drove its way to the top of the Greatest of All Time Adult Alternative Songs Chart 25 years later.

Fuel Economy: The lyrics merge with a sound that combines classic rock and a catchy ’90s radio feel to paint picture after picture of frustration transformed into opportunity. It’s the stuff of daydreams (and scream-sing material — with the windows rolled down, of course) while on a peaceful expanse of road … or while stuck in infuriating gridlock traffic.

Overdrive: After the darkness in the verses, the chorus feels like the rising sun coming up over the horizon to spread hope on an empty road: “Come on try a little/ Nothing is forever/ There’s gotta be something better than in the middle … We can drive it home/ With one headlight.” — A.C.

36. TOM COCHRANE, “LIFE IS A HIGHWAY”

Make and Model: Cochrane was a household name in Canada as the singer of band Red Rider long before 1991 — but that’s when he committed full-stop to one very lengthy metaphor and turned it into this propulsive global hit, which ultimately peaked at No. 6 on the Hot 100. (Just one indication of its enduring auto appeal: Rascal Flatts’ cover, for Pixar’s….yes, Cars… which brought the song back to the top 10 in 2006).

Fuel Economy: It’s scientifically impossible not to belt “Life is a highway/I wanna ride it all night long” while driving on a highway at, really, any time of day. But it’s not just the road-friendly lyrics that make this Road Trip Radio Canon — Cochrane’s percussive guitar and harmonica lines seem to always perfectly soundtrack scenery at the speed it flies by, plus they’re easy to tap out on steering-wheel percussion.

Overdrive: At precisely the 3 minute mark, the a cappella chorus reprise: a moment so perfect for boogie-ing in your seat that the Canadian youths in the music video pop out of theirs and just start to dance next to their convertible by the side of the road. — R.M.

35. GRACE JONES, “PULL UP TO THE BUMPER”

Make and Model: Hailing from Grace Jones’ 1981 classic Nightclubbing, “Pull Up to the Bumper” finds the pop provocateur melding disco, dub and electro; it took her to No. 2 on Dance Club Songs and No. 5 on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart.

Fuel Economy: Artists have been milking the driving-as-sex innuendo since at least the mid-1930s, but few have gotten as much mileage out of it as Jones on this fabulously filthy invitation to a lover.

Overdrive: If you don’t know what’s going on by the time she’s telling someone to take their “long black limousine” and “drive it in between” her bumper, well, maybe “drivers license” is more your speed. — J.L.

34. GRATEFUL DEAD, “TRUCKIN'” 

Make and Model: This super-laid-back 1970 ramble from the Dead’s beloved American Beauty album gave the grandaddy jam band the biggest Hot 100 hit of their first 20 years — as well as perhaps their all-time most singular mantra.

Fuel Economy: For a group that inspired so many Deadheads to hit the road and follow them on the tour that never ends, this travelogue highlights some of the group’s wilder early adventures on four wheels. From the “neon and flashing marquees on Main Street” to their terrible highway diet (“Livin’ on reds, vitamin C and cocaine”) and cooling their heels in a hotel room waiting for cops to bust down the door, this one depicts the wild life of a traveling musician with a wicked, knowing grin.

Overdrive: The chorus, of course: “Sometimes the light’s all shinin’ on me/ Other times I can barely see/ Lately, it occurs to me/ What a long, strange trip it’s been.” — G.K.

33. FRANK OCEAN, “SWIM GOOD”

Make and Model: Frank Ocean’s debut mixtape nostalgia, ULTRA grabbed the attention of the industry upon its 2011 release, with the lyrically dark “Swim Good” exploring themes of trying to deal with overwhelming heartbreak while behind the wheel, and emerging as one of the project’s biggest highlights. 

Fuel Economy: The brooding nature of “Swim Good” can quickly wind its way around your head and your heart. It’s easy to get lost while listening, but in a way that ultimately feels freeing – just remember that if your GPS is the one suggesting you drive into a body of water, it’s a safe bet to assume there’s no road there. 

Overdrive: In his second run through the pre-chorus, Frank Ocean dials it up as the real estate in front of him rapidly dwindles: “One more ‘til the road runs out, out!” — J.G.

32. DON HENLEY, “THE BOYS OF SUMMER”

Make and Model: When Tom Petty was underwhelmed by the original demo for this eventual No. 5 Billboard Hot 100 hit, Heartbreakers guitarist Mike Campbell played the song for Don Henley, who was looking for material for 1984 sophomore solo set Building The Perfect Beast. Campbell told the podcast The Moment that the following day, Henley called him to say, “I just wrote the best song of my life to your music” — and a 1986 Grammy for best male rock vocal performance supports that claim.

Fuel Economy:  The specific car references are subtle (“You got the top pulled down and the radio on, baby”), but “Boys of Summer” unquestionably plays like a slow, melancholy drive through an empty beach town as summer turns to fall. Backed by Campbell’s languid guitar and the Linn drum’s relentless delayed rimshots – which, to quote another Henley song, sound like “time, time ticking, ticking away” — the song becomes a metaphor for growing older and clinging to past ideals that don’t (or can’t) exist in the present.

Overdrive: In the third verse, Henley sings: “Out on the road today, I saw a Deadhead sticker on a Cadillac. A little voice inside my head said, “Don’t look back, you can never look back.” Inspired by a real-life experience on the San Diego Freeway, Henley has said that the jarring and oft-quoted car imagery essentially reference the hippies of the ‘60s selling out to become the yuppies of the ‘80s. –F.D.

31. CYNDI LAUPER, “I DROVE ALL NIGHT”

Make and Model: A widescreen power ballad originally intended for Roy Orbison (who recorded it but never released it in his lifetime), “I Drove All Night” became a No. 6 Hot 100 hit and Grammy-nominated vocal showcase for Cyndi Lauper off her 1989 album A Night to Remember; in 2003, Celine Dion revved it up for another Hot 100 run.

Fuel Economy: Over urgent strings and a pounding ’80s rock drum, Lauper spins a feverish, lusty tale of escaping the “sticky and cruel” city to hit the highway, with her lover’s cool caresses serving as the rose-red fingers of dawn at the end of a long, dark highway odyssey.

Overdrive: Lauper takes it off cruise control pretty early on, but when she switches up an octave mid-syllable at the 2:57 money note, it’s obvious her tank is running on premium. — J.L.

30. JACKSON BROWNE, “RUNNING ON EMPTY”

Make and Model: Music fans were stricken with a bad case of Saturday Night Fever in the spring of 1978, but there was still room on top 40 radio for this propulsive pop/rock track, which reached No. 11 that April. The song is autobiographical, reflective and exhilarating — a rare combination.

Fuel Economy: The song opens with an immediate backbeat, allowing it to immediately jump from 0 to 60. The song’s brisk tempo replicates what Browne recalls doing when he was 17 — running up California’s Highway 101.

Overdrive:.The song conveys some profound truths that give it unexpected depth. Who can’t relate to lines like “I don’t know when that road turned onto the road I’m on” and “You know, I don’t even know what I’m hoping to find”? — P.G.

29. ICE CUBE, “IT WAS A GOOD DAY”

Make and Model: Ice Cube paints a musical picture of what makes an ideal day in his native L.A.: cruising the streets, watching the Lakers beat the Supersonics, eating a Fatburger and not using your AK. With the laid-back 1993 song peaking at No. 15, Cube f–ked around and got his highest-charting single ever on the Hot 100.

Fuel Economy: Following in the tire tracks of War’s 1975 classic, Cube is specifically driving a lowrider in this song, boasting that he can both “make the ass drop” and “hit the three-wheel motion” over the course of his ride.

Overdrive: As he’s driving home after hooking up with his high school crush, instead of seeing an omnipresent “helicopter looking for a murder,” Ice Cube spots the welcome sight of the Goodyear Blimp — reading, of course, “Ice Cube‘s a Pimp.” A good day, indeed. — K.A.

28. VAN HALEN, “PANAMA”

Make andModel: Penned in stubborn response to criticism that the band only wrote about sex, drugs and fast cars — which made frontman David Lee Roth realize he’d never actually tried his hand at a proper driving song before — “Panama” was a stunningly sleek machine for a first-time effort.

Fuel Economy: As to be expected, even Roth’s car songs sound downright lascivious, with the showman singer bragging “Don’t you know she’s coming home with me/ You’ll lose her in that turn,” as sideman Eddie Van Halen audibly sets fire to his six-string on the scorching pre-chorus riff.

Overdrive: Nothing quite like that spoken-word bridge, when in between engine roars, Internet explorer for windows 10 - Crack Key For U purrs the narration, “You reach down between my legs, and… eeeeeeeaaaaaaaase the seat back.” — A.U.

27. WILSON PICKETT, “MUSTANG SALLY”

Make and Model: A funky, slow-grooving R&B hit for Wilson Pickett in 1966, “Mustang Sally” is an anguished rebuke to a woman who’s gifted a brand-new car and promptly speeds off, leaving her would-be sugar daddy in the dust.

Fuel Economy: With crisp percussion, a solid bass groove and hot licks spitting out from the electric organ, “Mustang Sally” oozes ’60s R&B cool. This isn’t about driving from Point A to Point B — it’s the soundtrack to a boastful, luxurious ride around town in your toy.

Overdrive: Pickett sells his exasperation nicely, but when those backup vocals chime in on the lady’s side with “ride, Sally, ride,” it’s clear we’re all gunning to ride shotty with Sally. — J.L.

26. RIHANNA, “SHUT UP AND DRIVE”

Make and Model: On the follow-up to an early career-defining chart-topper in “Umbrella,” Rihanna switched gears and fired up the engines for this smoother-than-a-limousine electro-rocking single, proving her output of pop smashes would never merely come off the assembly line.

Fuel Economy: Running lean and mean, “Shut Up and Drive” was undeniably muscular for late ’00s radio — perhaps a little too much so, as the song was the lone Good Girl Gone Bad single to miss the Hot 100’s top 10 — but it was still an efficient if sharp turn for RiRi, one ultimately used on a variety of movie soundtracks and even a 2010s Mazda commercial.

Overdrive: Hard to argue with the break squeal that punctuates the middle of Rih’s insistence of “Baby you got the keys… now, shut up and drive.” — A.U.

25. BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN, “RACING IN THE STREET”

Make and Model: From 1978’s Darkness on the Edge of Town, the favorite album among the most hardcore Springsteen fans, comes one of the saddest songs in The Boss’s canon full of small-town losers still looking to score — even though their fantasies are fading like an old paint job.

Fuel Economy: The majestic piano dirge details a car the narrator built “straight out of scratch,” which provides a sense of false bravado and separates him from guys he says “just give up living/ And start dying little by little, piece by piece.” But the third verse breaks through the facade as he sings about his girlfriend, her dreams shattered, who “stares off alone into the night/ With the eyes of one who hates for just being born.”

Overdrive: Even with a striking real-heads-only opening line like “I got a ’69 Chevy with a 396, fuelie heads and a Hurst on the floor,” you don’t have to know a thing about cars to recognize the broken-down characters. — M. Newman

24. DR. DRE, “LET ME RIDE”

Make and Model: No, this ain’t Aerosmith blasting from your radio on your ride to L.A.’s south side — it’s the motherf–kin’ D-R-E, in the midst of creating the G-Funk sound that would soon become the driving soundtrack for the entire mid-’90s.

Fuel Economy: While Dre is on his lonesome cruising from Greenleaf to Slauson in his “four with sixteen switches,” “Let Me Ride” is such a vivid and joyous four-wheel journey that by the end of the song, the rapper/producer’s got everybody singing along to the Parliament-swiped hook: “Swing down, sweet chariot, stop, and… let… me ride!

Overdrive: In the third verse, the MC unforgettably echoes the wide public anticipation that his audible presence “just up the street” caused back in 1992: “Is it Dre? Is it Dre?” — A.U.

23. CHARLI XCX, “VROOM VROOM”

Make and Model: Charli’s 2015 EP of the same name was no mere stopgap — it marked a turning point for the singer’s career, which always straddled the cusp of the mainstream and pop’s more daring fringes. With “Vroom Vroom” as her GPS and the PC Music crew as her co-navigators, she floored it for the latter — and never looked back.

Fuel Economy: “Vroom Vroom” sounds like a pop song not just about cars, but made by one: The late SOPHIE’s visionary production may as well have sampled the results of a crash-test site with all its scrape and bang sound effects. But just as SOPHIE often reveled in the tension between hard and soft sounds, Charli’s breezy, Y2K-era melodies on the pre-chorus are as plush as the seats of her lavender Lamborghini.

Overdrive: The Windows 7 Enterprise Product key goes from zero to 100 as soon as that demon-gurgle bass line kicks in — easily the most lit moment of a Charli XCX show. — N.F.

22. THE MODERN LOVERS, “ROADRUNNER”

Make and Model: The Modern Lovers proto-punk classic was released in 1972, as an ode to blaring the radio on the open roads in Massachusetts, where frontman Jonathan Richman hails from. 

Fuel Economy: The song captures the romanticism of being alone on the highway (or just the side streets) with nothing but the power of the AM radio to keep you company, and also succeeds in its sincere and openly biased loved for Richman’s home state.  

Overdrive: When Richman boyishly sings “I’m in love with Massachusetts/ And the neon when it’s cold outside” in the song’s opening verse. — T.M.

21. MEAT LOAF, “PARADISE BY THE DASHBOARD LIGHT”

Make and Model: Name one thing more American than this Jim Steinman-penned ode to trying to score in the backseat from Loaf’s mega-platinum 1977 masterpiece Bat Out of Hell. The operatic nearly nine-minute ode to faking it until she lets you make it famously includes an absurd interlude by former New York Yankees shortstop/announcer Phil Rizzuto, narrating a paper-thinly veiled baseball-as-sex rev-up.

Fuel Economy: Steinman said his goal was to write the “ultimate car/sex song in which everything goes horribly wrong in the end.” His overheated ode to teenage backseat fumbling hits all the automotive sex switches: parking by the lake, the drone of the radio, and a young man who will do anything for love, including that.

Overdrive: The mix of flop sweat, desperation and out-of-control hormones reaches a peak with the chorus wails, “Though it’s cold and lonely in the deep dark night/ I can see paradise by the dashboard light.” — G.K.

20. KRAFTWERK, “AUTOBAHN”

Make and Model: It only sounds like “fun, fun, fun.” The lyrics to Kraftwerk’s first song with words — which became a surprise top 40 hit, reaching No. 25 on the Hot 100 in 1975 — are “fahr’n, fahr’n, fahr’n,” or driving, driving, driving. The music matches, steady as she goes: Can may have pioneered krautrock’s 4/4 motorik drumbeat, but Kraftwerk brought it to U.S. radio.

Fuel Economy: “Autobahn” isn’t about going anywhere but forward on a road that stretches out as a “graues Band” — a gray ribbon — through a sunlit valley. It’s an ode to sheer driving pleasure that thrums with synths as soothingly open and repetitive as the highway itself. Machinery never sounded so warm and inviting.

Overdrive: Toward the end of the song, “now we turn the radio on” — it sounds better in German — and the song that comes out of the speaker is “Wir fahr’n fahr’n far’n auf der Autobahn.” Essentially, “Autobahn” is a song about driving down the highway and listening to the radio play a song about driving down the highway and listening to the radio play a song about driving down the highway, and so on, until the road fades into the horizon. — R.L.

19. L’TRIMM, “CARS THAT GO BOOM”

Make and Model: Lady Tigra and Bunny D.’s song about guys with subwoofers hit the Billboard Hot 100 in 1988, but the playful hip-hop track found new life in 2020 when it went viral thanks to a TikTok push.

Fuel Economy: While plenty of songs focus on the drive itself, the Miami-based teens zeroed in on the sound system and the thrill of a booming bass, with equally exhilarating results. 

Overdrive: Tigra and Bunny trading lines intended to shame you for your car’s lack of boom: “So if your speaker’s weak/Then please turn it off/’Cause we like the cars/That sound so tough.” — C.W.

18. WAR, “LOW RIDER”

Make and Model: A clanking cowbell and spitting drum roll set the stage for the titular driver (or just the automobile itself?) — either way, a star in its own right, as singer Charles Miller claims: “All my friends know the low rider.”

Fuel Economy: Not even Sanford and/or Son had theme music this funky in the 1970s, as the Low Rider gets higher and drives slower to the sweet sounds of loping bass and chirping alto sax.

Overdrive: After cruising with the rest of the band for the first two and a half minutes, at the end of the song, the sax peels out with its own soaring solo, as the Low Rider no doubt disappears into the sunset. — A.U.

17. THE KING COLE TRIO, “(GET YOUR KICKS ON) ROUTE 66”

Make and Model: This souped-up 1946 hit was initially credited to The King Cole Trio, the jazz trio that featured the legendary Nat “King” Cole.

Fuel Economy: “Route 66” is pure Americana. It was released in the year following the end of World War II, when Americans were hungry to return to normalcy, and celebrates the highway that facilitated interstate travel. It’s a song that has likely inspired more road trips over the ensuing decades than any other.

Overdrive: The song names 10 stops on the route from Chicago to L.A., including Joplin, Missouri, and Flagstaff, Arizona — and don’t forget Winona, of course. It all could have come off as corny, but instead it adds to the song’s retro charm. — P.G.

16. CHAMILLIONAIRE FEAT. KRAYZIE BONE, “RIDIN”

Make and Model: The on-the-go, Play-N-Skillz-produced 2005 single about racial profiling from Chamillionaire’s debut studio album, The Sound of Revenge, led the Hot 100 for two weeks in 2006, won a Grammy and spawned a  fellow top-10 charting parody song from Weird “Al” Yankovic. 

Fuel Economy: Chamillionaire’s Southern hip-hop stylings on “Ridin’” just don’t hit the same way unless they’re bumping out of vibrating car speakers. Passenger Krayzie Bone provides the perfect gear shift with his rapid-fire lyricism halfway through, which serves as a nice change of pace from the “swang it slow” feel that permeates elsewhere in the song.

Overdrive: The only acceptable answer here is: “They see me rollin’, they hatin’/ Patrollin’ and tryna catch me riiiidin’ dirrrrtyyyy….”– J.G.

15. GARY NUMAN, “CARS”

Make and Model: Gary Numan‘s early synth-pop classic off 1979 debut album The Pleasure Principle remains relevant to this day for its take on technology — whether behind the wheel or a digital screen.

Fuel Economy: Numan‘s timeless hit encapsulates the false sense of security, loneliness, and dependency that modern technology — in this case, cars — can leave with users, and it accomplishes this feat in just four chilling-yet-catchy verses and essentially a one-word chorus.

Overdrive: Numan‘s isolation and need comes through the moment he turns the ignition: “Here in my car/ I feel safest of all/ I can lock all my doors/ It’s the only way to live/ In cars.” — A.C.

14. JANIS JOPLIN, “MERCEDES BENZ”

Make and Model: “Mercedes Benz” is rock icon Janis Joplin’s short, comical a cappella jab at car consumerism, recorded just days before her death in 1970. 

Fuel Economy: The song humorously asks the Lord to buy her a Mercedes Benz — because all her friends drive Porches and she deserves at least a Benz — delivered straight-faced in Joplin’s stunning, singular wail. 

Overdrive: Her plea to the Lord for her Mercedes hits home when she claims her new luxury vehicle will “make amends” for working hard all her lifetime, “no help from her friends.” — T.M.

13. WARREN G FEAT. NATE DOGG, “REGULATE”

Make and Model: A stone G-Funk classic from 1994, “Regulate” finds Nate Dogg and Mr. Warren G hitting the East Side of the LBC and finding more action than they bargained for — though still taking some “skirts” back to the motel for their troubles.

Fuel Economy: Riding a Michael McDonald groove and a Bob James whistle hook, Warren G’s three-act odyssey perfectly captures the danger and allure of a late-night cruise that finds more twists and turns than expected — with Nate Dogg navigating brilliantly in the passenger seat.

Overdrive: Nate Dogg quoting his Death Row label head via a pickup’s coy request: “She said, ‘My car’s broke down and you sing real nice, would ya…. let… me ride?’” — A.U.

12. EAGLES, “TAKE IT EASY”

Make and Model: “Take It Easy” absolutely soars with the joy of the open road. From those instantly recognizable, layered, opening guitar chords to the Eagles’ soaring harmonies throughout, this first single from the band’s 1972 debut album reached No. 12 on the Billboard Hot 100, and set the stage for the group’s decades of massive success to come.

Fuel Economy:  Written by Jackson Browne and Glenn Frey, “Take It Easy” contains one of pop music’s greatest philosophical statements wrapped in automotive imagery: “Don’t let the sound of your own wheels drive you crazy.”

Overdrive:  In one concise, partly yelped rhyme, the song offers a hitchhiker’s fantasy: “It’s a girl, my Lord in flatbed Ford/ slowing down to take a look at me.” And with that, the Eagles put Winslow, Arizona on the pop music map. — T.D.

11. OLIVIA RODRIGO, “DRIVERS LICENSE”

Make and Model: In case you’ve recently emerged from a cave, “Drivers License” is the hearts-and-records-breaking suburban ballad from Olivia Rodrigo that sped onto the scene at the top of the year and previewed the singer-songwriter’s rapturously received debut album, Sour.

Fuel Economy: Never before has there been such a sincere and emotive ode to a plastic ID card, as Rodrigo equates the freedom of being a teen able to drive with the less exciting flip side of being a teen able to have your world shattered by a breakup for the first time.

Overdrive: The best free ram booster for pc - Crack Key For U near-one-minute bridge, which begins with Rodrigo crooning, “Red lights, stop signs,” takes the song into near-warp speed, swelling with emotion before she admits one last time to herself in a whisper: “Now I drive alone past your street.” — L.H.

10. THE BEATLES, “DRIVE MY CAR”

Make and Model: The rare car song from the chauffeur’s perspective, this 1965 Fab Four gem sees narrator Paul McCartney enlisted for transport by a would-be starlet — though as she admits in the song’s third-verse twist, she doesn’t exactly have the wheels for him just yet. The driver’s a start, anyway.

Fuel Economy: Kicking off the original U.K. tracklist to The Beatles’ classic 1965 LP Rubber Soul, “Drive My Car” opens in third gear and keeps humming from there, a funny, breezy, rollicking good time for all, even as the actual driving never escapes the theoretical.

Overdrive: Sing it with us now, falsetto if you can: “BEEP BEEP, BEEP BEEP, YEAH!!” — A.U.

9. CHUCK BERRY, “NO PARTICULAR PLACE TO GO”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I3xlFMTZWnM

Make and Model: Chuck Berry’s 1964 rock’n’roll romp hits like a warm breeze while riding down the highway — at least until that modern machine foils his date by way of a pesky, unfastenable seatbelt. 

Fuel Economy: “No Particular Place to Go” is a snapshot of car culture in the 1960s, when autos were the ultimate social capital, played a part in the destination and — at least in this case — occasionally held the riders captive. 

Overdrive: Berry truly pulls the listener in when he swoons, “Cuddlin’ more and drivin’ slow/ With no particular place to go.” — T.M.

8. NELLY FEAT. CITY SPUD, “RIDE WIT ME” 

Make and Model: Though not officially released as a single in February 2001, this top-down anthem was a summertime hit for any driver who bought Nelly’s debut album, Country Grammar, when it dropped in June 2000.

Fuel Economy: A looped guitar part rides shotgun, keeping things light and lively, and with the song clocking in at nearly five minutes, “Ride Wit Me” provides just enough runway for you to shout “Must be the money!” exactly 17 times.

Overdrive: Nelly tipping his St. Louis Blues hat to one of the hottest cars at the time, the Range Rover HSE: “Watch me as I gas that 4 dot 6 Range/Watch the candy paint change every time I switch lanes.” — C.W.

7. JACKIE BRENSTON AND HIS DELTA CATS, “ROCKET 88”

Make and Model: Released in 1951 with rollicking piano, honking saxophone, fuzz-tone guitar, bluesy vocals and a driving beat, “Rocket 88” has widely been described as the first rock’n’roll song — and how fitting that a car song should have that honor! Credited to Jackie Brenston and his Delta Cats, the track was actually the creation of Ike Turner and his band the Kings of Rhythm, for whom Brenston sang lead and played sax.

Fuel Economy:  Brenston is said to have suggested the idea of the song to Turner, inspired by the Oldsmobile Rocket 88 full-sized sedan, which roared off a Detroit assembly line for the first time two years earlier.

Overdrive: Brentson’s voice glides gloriously over the word “jalopies” in Turner’s opening lyric as he laments “the noise they make” and proudly shows off “my new Rocket 88.”  When he sings the second verse — ”V-8 motor and this modern design/ black convertible top and the gals don’t mind” — no showroom salesman could do better. — T.D.

6. GOLDEN EARRING, “RADAR LOVE”

Make and Model: A bleary-eyed and fevered ’70s road rave-up from Dutch rockers Golden Earring, “Radar Love” is the greatest musical approximation of the last leg of a seemingly endless highway journey home — when the only thing even keeping you conscious is singing along to “some forgotten song” on the radio.

Fuel Economy: With a murmuring bass line and cymbal-heavy drum rhythm as hypnotic as the road passing under your wheels, the song almost dares you to stay focused as the blacktop in front of you stretches on into nothingness and your hands get wetter and wetter on the steering wheel — though at least that instantly iconic guitar lick snaps you back to attention a couple times a verse.

Overdrive: Hard to pick just one signature moment from a song filled to the brim with unforgettable lyrics and musical figures — and let’s not forget about that unexpectedly action-packed midsong breakdown either — but a relatable highlight comes after that instrumental section, when Barry Hay insists, “No more speed, I’m almost there,” and you can’t tell whether it’s actually the truth or just road delirium speaking. — A.U.

5. PRINCE, “LITTLE RED CORVETTE”

Make and Model: In April 1983, this sexy song became Prince’s first top 10 hit on the Hot 100, peaking at No. 6 the following month. By current, “WAP”-era standards, this song is PG, but at the time, it was considered racy for a major, multi-format hit.

Fuel Economy: It’s a car song, a sex song and a Saturday night song (“It was Saturday night/I get that makes it all right”). How could it miss?

Overdrive: Prince had built a reputation as someone who was sexually adventurous, so it was fun to see him meet his match and have to confess “I felt a little ill when I saw all the pictures of the jockeys that were there before me.” — P.G. 

4. EAZY-E, “BOYZ-N-THE-HOOD”

Make and Model: The gangsta rap classic originally released as Eazy-E’s 1987 debut single before — being remodeled as a track on N.W.A’s self-titled EP, “Boyz-n-the-Hood” — finds Eazy taking listeners out on a day in the life, detailing every stop in his 1964 Chevy Impala, which doesn’t even make it to the end of the song. 

Fuel Economy: Eazy casually cruises through a beautiful day in the neighborhood with the ease of Mr. Rogers, despite all the dangerous turns the song takes — from Kilo G’s grand theft auto conquest of an El Camino (which later lands him in the slammer) to Eazy’s recollection of shooting his old pal JD for trying to steal his car radio. Even the song’s origins are rooted in cars: Dr. Dre produced the song for Eazy as a favor after the latter bailed Dre out of jail for owing thousands of dollars in unpaid parking tickets for his Mazda RX7. 

Overdrive: The rapper’s way of tracking his ordinary journey in his 6-4, from cruising down the streets in it to pulling up to the spot “where my homeboys chill,” takes an unexpected turn as he wraps it around a telephone pole before the night’s end. Ultimately, he proves how disposable his prized possession was all along, as he sing-songs, ”I looked at my car and I said, ‘Oh brother’/ I throw it in the gutter, and go buy another.” — H.M.

3. THE BEACH BOYS, “I GET AROUND”

Make and Model: A classic cool-kids anthem from the summer of 1964, the Beach Boys proved that the Cali kids could still do youth culture bangers as well as those moptops from Liverpool, as the song topped the Hot 100 for two weeks at the very height of Beatlemania.

Fuel Economy: The Beach Boys had more explicit car odes than this adrenaline-pumped ode to West Coast cruising, but none that captured the timeless feeling of driving the strip on a Saturday night with your buddies and your best girl, feeling absolutely invincible because your car still hasn’t been beaten even once.

Overdrive: Just nothing like that gorgeously harmonized (but still entirely idm full version free download with serial key - Crack Key For U “Get-around-round-round, I get around” refrain, making you want to pop the collar on your letterman jacket every single time. — A.U.

2. TRACY CHAPMAN, “FAST ALLPlayer Full Download - Crack Key For U loading="lazy" title="Tracy Chapman - Fast Car (Official Music Video)" width="500" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/AIOAlaACuv4?feature=oembed" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen>

Make and Model: In this unlikely 1988 Hot 100 top 10 hit, Tracy Chapman tells the heart-rending folk-pop story of a woman escaping her bleak life in a fast car — only to drive right into yet another dreary reality.

Fuel Economy: The title vehicle serves as an escape plan, a bubble for the seemingly endless possibilities of romance and, finally, as a getaway car once more — but this time for her now-ex, as a fed-up Chapman delivers the devastating dismissal, “Take your fast car and keep on driving.”

Overdrive: Three allavsoft spotify crack - Free Activators verses backed by acoustic guitar all lead up to the moment when the chorus (and the drumbeat) finally kicks in: “So remember when we were driving/ Driving in your car….” — K.A.

1. BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN, “BORN TO RUN”

Make and Model: 46 years after its release “Born To Run” — the larger-than-life highway epic title track from Bruce Springsteen’s 1975 album — remains as classic as any Ford truck, Chevy muscle car or other quintessential American model.

Fuel Economy: While the lyrics may not explicitly say so, make no mistake, this song is about a race: between the “death trap, suicide rap” small town that will pound your dreams into workaday submission and the “chrome wheeled, fuel injected” car that might deliver you from this fate — if you’re brave enough to get behind the wheel and just drive away. In this way then, “Born To Run” is about the dichotomy of fate and destiny: between acquiescing to the life into which you were born, or instead choosing to believe that you were actually born to run, to take a chance, to break free, to get in the car, ride out of Freehold, New Jersey on Highway 9. And in doing so, to embody the fundamentally American ideal of taking hold of your freedom and future via the talismanic vehicle that might deliver you and Wendy somewhere better — even if that somewhere better is for now just a undetermined location miles down the highway.

Overdrive: The famous wall-of-sound structure to “Born” is especially pronounced in the climax, where Bruce preaches that he wants to die with Wendy “in an everlasting kiss” — before the E Street Band launches into a crescendo of drums, keys and guitars, which crashes and gives way to a resurgent Boss, protesting that while the “highway is jammed with broken heroes on a last-chance power drive,” his own quest will not be deterred by such gridlock. — K.B.

Источник: https://www.billboard.com/articles/news/list/9591317/greatest-car-songs-all-time-top-100/

MEET YOUR NEW
BASS PLAYER.

Meet your new bass player

We are proud to introduce the market’s first bass software of its kind. One that goes above and beyond a traditional sample library to deliver not only pristine sound but also fundamental features that effortlessly let you to add bass to your songs.

TWO BASSES.

Two carefully sampled bass guitars
– one vintage and one modern.

SONGWRITING.

Arrange, compose, change and rearrange – without leaving the software.

MIDI.

Comes with bass MIDI for a broad
range of styles.

A BASS PLAYER.

Use drum or keyboard MIDI and have EZbass automatically create matching basslines.

GRID EDITOR.

Alter the performance or the subtler details of the MIDI using the built-in ‘Grid Editor.’

AUDIO TRACKER.

Audio to MIDI conversion based on the same technology found in Superior Drummer 3.

EZBASS – INTRODUCTION.

What is EZbass and how can it help you in your creative process?
Learn all that and more in this video.

Holiday Sales.

Holiday Sales.

Buy EZbass, get
a free MIDI pack
included.

Buy EZbass, get
a free MIDI pack
included.

1. Add EZbass
to your cart
2. Select your EZbass MIDI pack
3. Complete your purchase and…meet your new bass player!

Find full terms and conditions at the bottom of this page.

The concept of our EZ Line products has been clear since day one: to give you, the songwriter, wolfram mathematica online only products that make your music sound great, but also the tools you need in order to create music. Creativity is the hallmark at the front and center of the EZ Line design. EZbass, of course, is no different.

With EZbass, there are multiple ways of adding bass to an already written song.

Add Groove

Simply click the ‘Add Groove’ button to get a basic rhythm going.

Drums & Keys

Use the drum or keyboard MIDI in your song to have EZbass automatically create a matching bassline.

Tap2Find

Tap in the rhythm you want your bass to play using the ’Tap2Find’ feature and then have EZbass list all matching variations.

Audio Tracker

Use a previously recorded guitar, bass or rhythm performance and then have EZbass convert the audio to MIDI.

MIDI to audio

Perform the bassline yourself using a MIDI controller.

BASS

The ‘Bass’ view is the default screen that launches when you start the program. It gives you the visual representation of your selected instrument, a real-time display of the bass notes being played in your performance as well as access to the ‘Effects’ and ‘Tuning’ controls.

The ’Song Track’ is static regardless of which view you’re currently in but can of course be collapsed and hidden away completely. This is your MIDI hub for anything related to organizing the layout of your song or bass performance. From here, you can also access several fundamental features.

WATCH THE VIDEO.

Pointer, Pencil and Split tools

Pointer, Pencil and Split tools

Write, slice, dice and arrange.

Add Groove

Add Groove

Instantaneously add a groove of pumping eighth notes.

Add/Edit Chords

Add/Edit Chords

Add and/or change any highlighted chord(s).

Transition

Transition

Easily add seamless transitions and slides between chords.

Replace MIDI

Replace MIDI

Keep the chords in your selected block but replace the MIDI with what you select in the ’Grooves’ browser.

Edit Play Style

Edit Play Style

Change octave, velocity, damping, note length or the overall complexity of your rhythm using the ‘Amount’ knob.


Grooves tab
GROOVES

YOUR PERSONAL
BASS PLAYER.

At the heart of EZbass is the MIDI. It includes a wealth of different playing styles for all common genres and was designed to give you the broadest possible palette of options. Ultimately, you decide how the bass performs on your song. Of course, all included MIDI can be infinitely customized – without you having to leave the program.


Grid Editor tab
GRID EDITOR

REFINE YOUR BASSLINE.

Simply double-click a MIDI block in the ‘Song Track’ to enter the ‘Grid Editor.’ From there, you can alter articulations, adjust timing, fine-tune velocities, manually write parts and much more.


DRUMS & KEYS

LIKE MAGIC.

Have a drum or keyboard MIDI file that you need a matching bassline for? Just drag and drop it in EZbass and it will automatically create a matching performance. This is extremely powerful for getting a good starting point, quick and easy.


AUDIO TRACKER

TURN ANYTHING INTO A BASS.

The ‘Audio Tracker’ was designed to mainly handle monophonic guitar or bass audio, but it also has a deep understanding for rhythmic material. This means that you can use an already recorded guitar, bass or percussive performance, import it to EZbass and have it seamlessly ‘translate’ it to MIDI. You can even record your own audio, right inside EZbass!

EZbass includes two fundamentally different instruments, both picked to complement one another and paint the broadest possible sonic scope. Each bass was sampled with the same attention to detail and quality that has made Toontrack spearhead the drum sampling industry for 20 years and counting.

TWO BASSES.

Two fundamentally different instruments.

RICH DETAIL.

Sampled with painstaking detail and articulation options.

LOW TUNING.

Both basses go as low as A0.

The Modern bass

THE MODERN BASS.

The ‘Modern’ sound library features an Alembic* bass, a high-end American brand endorsed by many top players around the world. It was captured with both fingers, pick and slap options.

“When we started the EZbass project, we were looking for an instrument that could produce the most versatile and well-rounded tone possible,” comments Magnus Melkersson, EZbass lead R&D technician. “We scoured the market and tried dozens of basses before we finally landed on this one. I have played bass all my life and I have personally never come across an instrument more dynamic, expressive or full of life than this one. It truly is a beautiful instrument that embodies the entire frequency range you need in a bass. It was the perfect choice for the ‘Modern’ library.”

One thing that particularly sets this instrument apart from other basses is the pickups – single-coils with an active hum-cancelling coil mounted in between. This gives the instrument the tonal single-coil characteristics but leaves out any inherent noise. Both the bridge and neck pickups were sampled separately, allowing you to use each pickup separately or seamlessly blend between them. In other words, it’s literally like having two basses in one.

LISTEN.

*All other manufacturers’ product names are trademarks of their respective owners, which are in no way associated or affiliated with Toontrack. See full notice here.

The Vintage bass

THE VINTAGE BASS.

The ‘Vintage’ library features a classic Fender* Jazz bass, an instrument used across all genres since the 1960s and one that still to this day remains one of the world’s most iconic bass guitars.

“As a contrast to the ‘Modern’ bass, we wanted an instrument that was fundamentally different in all aspects – from tone, frequency range and pickups to overall feel,” says Ulf Edlund, one of the lead EZbass sound designers. “This bass has a completely different set of harmonics compared to the ‘Modern.’ Although it sits perfectly in any pop, rock or even metal track, it truly shines in any context that calls for something more mellow. I would pick this bass over anything else for a jazz, blues or country song.”

This bass was hot-wired to offer the same type of flexibility with the pickup options as the ‘Modern’ bass, meaning you can use each pickup separately or seamlessly blend between them.

LISTEN.

*All other manufacturers’ product names are trademarks of their respective owners, which are in no way associated or affiliated with Toontrack. See full notice here.

Articulations

ARTICULATIONS.

PICK, THUMP, SLAP, POP!

EZbass delivers the most all-encompassing set of articulations you need in order to produce stunningly real performances for anything from subtle jazz to extreme metal. The main tools of the ‘Modern’ bass include fingers, pick and slap while the ‘Vintage’ bass includes fingers and pick.

Presets

With EZbass, a great tone is merely a mouse slap away. The presets in EZbass cover a broad range of expertly crafted tones based on amp and cab simulation as well as on the same complex network of effects used behind the scenes in all EZ Line products.

TAKE CONTROL.

Fine-tune your bass tone with intuitive controls.

SUB-BASS

Two synthesized sine tones for each preset.

DIRECT IN.

Use the DI preset option to process externally.

GET IT AS PART OF A BUNDLE.

This bundle includes EZdrummer 2, EZbass, EZmix 2 and one EZkeys of your choice. Welcome to a world of sound and a songwriting experience that covers the entire range from drums and bass to keys and mixing/mastering.

EZ LINE SOFTWARE COLLECTION

Supported Hosts *

Ableton Live(version 9 or above)
Cakewalk(version 2018 or above)
Cubase(version 6 or above)
Digital Performer(version 9 or above)
GarageBand(version 10 or above)
Logic Pro(version 9 or above)
Pro Tools(version 12 or above)
REAPER(version 6 or above)
Studio One Artist(version 5 or above)
Studio One Professional(version 2 or above)
Waveform(version 10 or above)

* The list consists of hosts where the main features of our software work. There might be cases where features like drag & drop of MIDI, multi-channel-out, MIDI channel filtering or other non-critical features do not work. If unsure, we recommend that you investigate with the respective manufacturer what limitations may exist in their environment. If your host is not listed it means that we have not tested it. It may still work but a prerequisite is that the host supports VST2, AU or AAX instruments.

SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS.

5 GB of free hard disk space.

64-bit Windows 7 or newer, 4 GB RAM (8 GB RAM or more recommended).

macOS 10.10 or higher, Intel or Apple silicon processor, 4 GB RAM (8 GB RAM or more recommended).
64-bit host (with support for VST, VST3, AU or AAX). Standalone is included.

Источник: https://www.toontrack.com/product/ezbass/

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