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We test the KC2500 NVMe SSD from Kingston: Read on to know more The drive itself sits atop an Acronis True Image HD activation key. As SSD Benchmark 2.0 7316.34247 Crack + Product Key Free Download 2021 Now, you can configure your system with either an HDD, SSD, or in. The capacity, serial number and UPC code are clearly printed on either They are CrystalDiskMark, ATTO Disk Benchmark, AS SSD Benchmark.

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Every day the war for data rages and much of it is out of the public eye. Lately hackers seem to attack at will and this high profile type of data theft is rampant. The most sensitive of government data isn't as vulnerable as data that proliferates in the private sector, but the data is still definitely at risk.

Proteus Plus Military SSD

Today we are delving into new territory, the land of Military/Ruggedized and Industrial SSDs. These can be among the most interesting of SSDs, simply because of some of the features added to make them survive some of the harshest environments in the world and protect sensitive data at all costs.

Last year the Iranian government was able to capture a top-secret US drone never viewed by the public. The most discussed topic pertaining to the capture was the data that was contained on the drone itself. Encrypted data transmissions and the codes themselves, could allow the Iranian government to capture further top-secret data and drones and snoop on encrypted communications. On the other hand, they could even sell that data to more nefarious countries with the technology to exploit it further.

This event had members of the government and the media questioning how this data is stored and protected. Do we just have drones flying about with top-secret information out there? The simple answer is yes; all governments have sensitive data stored in laptops, vehicles, drones and satellites. The trick is to protect this type of information from those that would seek to capture it.

This is where the militarized and ruggedized SSD products come into the picture. SSDs by their very nature are best suited for the industrial and militarized space. They are more resilient than HDDs, which have moving parts that can be susceptible to failure by many factors in tough environments that simply do not budge an SSD. By tough environments, we are speaking of being launched into space under tremendous G-Forces, flying through the stratosphere in drones and taking enemy fire in tanks and other combat vehicles.

The SSD is well suited to these types of applications, but the business of making ruggedized SSDs requires that there are steps taken to make these SSDs function under even more extreme circumstances.

The TeleCommunication Systems base model comes ready for a rough life, but also has specialized options available and one that even allows for the SSD to work while totally submerged in water. Let's take a look inside at some of the features that make this SSD stand out from the crowd.

Ruggedized Internals

Lifting the drive for inspection it becomes clear by the heft that this isn't your garden variety SSD from Amazon. The SSD has a solid feel to it due to its precision-machined aluminum alloy case.

The rear of the case at first appears unremarkable, but closer inspection reveals some non-standard screws rarely seen in consumer SSDs.

These Torx screws were installed into the drive without normal thread locking to ease our ability to remove them and conduct the review. In actual deployments the screws will be thread locked, making them nearly impossible to remove with standard approaches.

As we start to open up the SSD, we can see that the case has a channel milled between the two sides of the case. This channel allows for gel fills that can seal the case for waterproofing purposes if the customer desires that option. These types of seals provide for moisture proofing in very humid environments and dustproofing for dry sandy environments.

Once we pop off the rear panel, we can observe the additional fasteners that hold the circuit board down securely. The eight additional fasteners hold this board down tightly. This makes the PCB extremely resistant to any type of vibration or G-Forces that would potentially cause the PCB to move out of place or crack.

We also notice the odd-looking pins that protrude from the front of the case. These headers are for different methods of secure erasing, which we will cover shortly.

Once we remove the PCB from the bottom of the case, we note that the PCB does not rest directly on the surface of the case. There is a gap between the PCB and the bottom of the case as well. This allows the entire case to be injected with silicone gel, which will encapsulate the PCB and all vital components. This protects it from any type of water or dust hazards.

There is also the option of silicone, urethane or polymer conformal coating to round out the various forms of protecting the internals and the external case itself.

The rear of the PCB holds eight packages of Micron 25nm SLC NAND. The NAND, 29F128G08AJAAA, reveals that this is asynchronous NAND. SLC is utilized because of not only its excellent wear characteristics, it can withstand 100,000 P/E cycles compared to 5,000 cycles from premium MLC, but also the performance in high heat conditions. SLC has much better data retention performance at higher temperatures, along with lower bit error rates and superb latency. For this capacity of drive, it could tolerate a rough estimate of 35 Petabytes in transfers.

Finally, we get to the front of the PCB, which contains the Indilinx Barefoot controller. This controller, utilized for years now, is as stable as they come. Most commercial and enterprise SSDs released today are obsolete within a year. For the Militarized segment, the design and testing phase alone for these SSDs takes roughly a year. This approach guarantees 100% reliability.

The choice to use a SSD controller with such low specifications might be surprising to many. The key here is the reliability.

In the militarized and industrial segments performance takes a back seat to reliability. Lives can literally be on the line so it is crucial for the SSD to have reliable and predictable performance. Coupling this controller with SLC is going to provide for more than enough speed for its application in deployments.

Blue BGA underfill surrounds both the Indillinx controller and the 64MB cache chip. This allows for a higher resistance to shock and temperature changes over the life of the device than solder alone can provide. This underfill adds additional rigidity to ensure the solder points do not fatigue significantly, limiting the risk of additional failure. For further protection, there is also the option for each component to have staking applied.

Secure Erase Features

Finally we come to the header that is located on the front of the Proteus Plus case. This is not standard fare on consumer SSDs, but is certainly a crucial component for the Proteus. The Indillinx Barefoot controller does not provide for hardware level encryption, though using software encryption will be common.

This lack of hardware level encryption makes it critical that the fast destruction of the data contained on the SSD is possible. This is where the secure erase functionality, enabled via either software or hardware triggers, comes into play.

This header is a General Purpose I/O header. This allows the SSD to be secure erased via a number of methods, including jumpers or hardware triggers. The hardware triggers can be either physical buttons or remote triggers that assure data destruction. Other possible uses could be triggers activated when panels are removed or when the SSD is removed from the location that it is installed within. There are a number of possibilities, but that is up to the end-user or agency. TCS simply provides them a port to connect the device of their choice.

There are two holes to either side of the GPIO port. One is for a green LED power indication light and the other is for a blue LED to indicate that a secure erase is taking place. If the secure erase is interrupted by a loss of power, it will simply continue upon power restoration.

The Proteus Plus SSD has eight different methods of data destruction. While this may seem over the top, several different governmental agencies have their own specifications for handling data destruction. This includes a bevy of military and governmental agency approved data destruction methods, which range from a fast erase (under eight seconds for our model) to secure erase + overwrite methods in a variety of flavors.

Methods that confirm to US Army, Navy, Air Force, Department of Defense and the National Security Agency specifications round out the list of erasure methods:

Fast Erase, DoD NISPOM 5220.22-M, DoD NISPOM 5220.22-M Sup 1, NSA/CSS 9-12, Army AR 380-19, Navy NAVSO P-5239-26, Air Force AFSSI-5020 and RCC-TG IRIG 106-7.

Test System

We will not be testing this SSD under our normal Enterprise Storage Bench. The reasoning behind this different approach to our testing regimen is that this Military/Industrial/Ruggedized SSD isn't utilized in typical enterprise scenarios by any means. These SSDs will not spend their lives doing anything as mundane as chugging away in a server rack nonstop.

Instead, they will subject to wild extremes. Shot into space, placed into combat situations and conducting top-secret missions. The majority of applications that will utilize this SSD will not require the highest specifications or need to operate under enterprise steady state conditions for an extended time. The data loads placed upon this type of SSD are typically going to be light, such as data logging and telemetry data in aircraft and recording in satellites. These applications will require performance that will be closer in line with consumer testing than our Enterprise Storage Bench, so we will use several consumer benchmarks that are available to the public.

As much as we would like to go skeet shooting with this SSD or even just go throw it in the pool, we aren't allowed to do any hardcore environmental testing. This falls to independent laboratories certified by governmental agencies to handle this type of testing.

Since we have no other SSD of this type to compare to we will be simply presenting the test results by themselves. Perhaps as we receive more SSDs for the industrial or military space we can begin to do some apples-to-apples testing, which unfortunately will not involve shooting at them with rocket launchers.

Specifications

A brief synopsis of the finer points of the Proteus Plus, then off to testing. It is interesting to see that some of the MIL-STD-810 options include Explosive Atmosphere and Gunfire Vibration.

ATTO

ATTO is a test that operates outside of the file system installed on the host system. This allows the benchmark to test the performance of the drive without the limitations that some file systems can impose on the storage device. The typical file system does have some overhead and restrictions that can hamper readings of the sequential bandwidth in particular.

This approach gives a clear view of the sequential performance of the drive under testing and used by the majority of manufacturers to generate the specifications that they market.

The Proteus Plus easily meets its marketed specifications in the sequential testing with ATTO. The SSD performs well in the lower Queue Depths and then scales very nicely up to a maximum of 275MB/s in read speed and 263MB/s with the sequential write testing. These results are at the maximum that the SATA 2.6 interface can provide.

Crystal Disk Mark

Crystal Disk Mark measures a number of various types of file access patterns to the data storage device under testing. The benchmark uses both sequential and random data, along with varying Queue Depths for the random data, creating a compelling disk benchmark for users. There is also the ability to select between testing with compressible and incompressible data.

The Indilinx Barefoot controller performs the same regardless of the compressibility of the data at hand, so we will be using the standard default benchmark mode with Crystal Disk Mark.

The sequential read and write results are close to the results that we achieved with ATTO. The random 4K read at the Queue Depth of is 33.96, which is comparable with even current generation SSDs at that same Queue Depth. The write speed is considerably slower than today's models and the SSD does not scale well with the 4K write results at the higher QD. This is typical behavior expected from this generation of SSD.

The typical applications for the Proteus will typically not consist of heavy random write workloads.

AS SSD

AS SSD is one of the few benchmarks that was actually designed with the SSD solely in mind. It tests with many of the same metrics that are included with Crystal Disk Mark with the notable inclusion of latency measurement. AS SSD tests latency with a 512B file size at a Queue Depth of one, while the industry specification is actually 4k QD1.

AS SSD testing consists of incompressible data in the main benchmark. There is testing with varying levels of compression with one of the subtests. We will not be including that test as the Barefoot processor performs the same regardless of the compressibility of the data.

The AS SSD results show the same relatively good low QD write performance and the lack of scaling with the 4K random write speed. This result is a hallmark of previous generations of SSDs. These relatively low scores are miles ahead of even the fastest HDDs on the market.

Anvil Storage Utilities

Anvil Storage Utilities is the other premier SSD-centric benchmark. Anvil measures the file system performance with a variety of file sizes and focuses on providing latency measurements for each type of data access. This is very important, as latency is the key advantage that SSDs have over their HDD competitors. Latency is the driving force behind that feeling of "˜snappiness' from the attached storage.

Anvil also has other built-in utilities that test with more specific user defined parameters. Threaded read and write testing is possible with manual QD settings. There is also an endurance application and the ability to test with varying levels of compression. Anvil also does a great job of illustrating the type of system and drivers used in the testing of the storage right on the face of the benchmark screen. This can help when comparing results with different drivers and firmware revisions.

Overall, the SSD performs within expected parameters for this paring of controller and NAND.

HD Tune and Quick Bench

HD Tune

HD Tune tests over the entire surface of the drive or NAND in this case, by systematically writing or reading over every LBA on the attached storage. The initial design for HD Tune was for the testing of hard disk drives. As the drive progresses in the test, it would illustrate the loss of speed as the head moved from the outer portion of the platter to the inner regions.

This approach can also be uniquely suited for SSDs, as it will highlight any inconsistent or erratic behavior in the SSD as it fills with data.

The read only average latency remains remarkably consistent across the entire drive during testing, an expected result when using premium SLC NAND. There is very little variability between the minimum, maximum and average read speeds.

The write speed is remarkably consistent, with a flat line of 250MB/s across the entire surface of the NAND. This isn't surprising with the implementation of SLC NAND.

Quick Bench

Quick Bench conducts a user configurable number of runs (termed Cycles) and then provides the average of those cycles as the result. This can blur out any peak values and show results that are indicative of continued usage. This is particularly relevant when assessing write performance. There is also the option to perform a variety of testing at various file sizes. The option to allow disk cache effects injects pauses between write commands to clear the write cache. Unchecking this box removes the testing of the write caching entirely.

Providing results across numerous file sizes in both random and sequential access both graphically and numerically provides a great representation of the overall storage performance.

The straight lines represent the average speed of the different variations and the curved lines represent the average of the five combined cycles. The random and sequential write speed is remarkably consistent, regardless of the size of file tested.

The highlighted areas indicate both the highest and lowest marks for each test. Here we can note that the random read and write speed with larger file sizes is surprisingly good.

Final Thoughts

The mobile explosion has created a huge problem for the various government agencies tasked with creating, storing and protecting classified data. Reality can be scary. On March 15th of this year a nuclear scientist's laptop went missing on a train in India. The implication of missing sensitive nuclear data in this volatile region of the world is simply alarming. This loss isn't just a threat to the security of India, it could be a threat to the entire world.

In June of this year, a top-secret laptop containing Taiwanese plans for a stealth ship went missing and presumably is in the hands of the Chinese government. Unfortunately, these aren't isolated events and well publicized security breaches with laptops have happened in the UK and the US as well. Loss of equipment such as the top secret US drone in Iran also brings the relevance of data security to light.

Maybe what is the scariest are the losses of data that we aren't even aware of. Information that is so sensitive that even the loss will never be confirmed nor denied. Protecting data that can cost human lives brings a tremendous responsibility along with it. In these types of applications, reliability comes to the forefront and speed is a secondary consideration. That is the purpose of utilizing the Indilinx Barefoot controller with the Proteus Plus SSD. It is stable and a proven performer that has stood the test of time. Making this controller forward compatible with the newer generations of NAND is an important step to making this a relevant NAND/controller combination.
 
The only notable feature that is lacking is power capacitors for data protection in the event of power loss. This may have been lost to price constraints as power capacitors typically add quite a bit of cost to the end product.

Features that harden the SSD abound with the base design of this SSD providing a tremendous amount of protection from the majority of environmental hazards. The added ability to customize this SSD to withstand the most violent of forces adds an extra layer of protection. BGA underfill, staking of components, conformal coating and gel encapsulation will support just about any use.

Perhaps most important are the steps taken to ensure that the data contained on the SSD is safe. While the device does not support encryption at the hardware level, the majority of secure applications will employ software encryption as a standard.

What is important is the ability to destroy the data immediately. The plethora of secure erase methods provides a means to please even the most scrutinizing of government agencies. Triggering these different types of data destruction with either software or hardware is a neat feature that will allow for multiple methods of destruction with a single SSD. Anything from too many password attempts, remote triggers or physically moving the SSD could delete the data.

It can be frightening to think of the power that a bunch of ones and zeros can have when they fall into the wrong hands, but the advent of technology and devices such as the Proteus Plus can help keep that data secure under the most demanding scenarios.

Update from manufacturer: "The Proteus Plus does not feature tantalum capacitors, but instead uses a Power Management Circuit designed to protect the data resting in the volatile SDRAM cache at any moment. This is done by a power monitoring circuit in lieu of a passive RC circuit. The power monitoring circuit issues an early reset generated up to 200ms earlier as power is removed. The reset is used to both reset the controller IC as well as write protect the flash chips, leading to less chance of data corruption by an attempted write with unstable power. TCS System engineering has tested tens of thousands of power failures with this Power Management Circuitry and has not observed a loss of data with this technique."

Источник: https://www.militarysystems-tech.com/articles/telecommunication-systems-proteus-plus-military-ssd-preview

Samsung SSD T3 Review

samsung-ssd-t3-review_01Following its external T1 SSD drive last year, Samsung is back with a T3 SSD USB 3.1 drive that targets the same market, with some improvements. This new drive can put up to 2TB of storage in about 2.75 cubic inches. I’ll go over the design, some performance numbers, use cases and a comparison with its predecessor.

Industrial design

samsung-ssd-t3-review_02

The general form factor of the Samsung SSD T3 is comparable to the SSD T1. As you hold it, it is evident that this new design is a little bit bigger. From the specs, I can say that this T3 2TB unit is 2.75 cubic inches in volume, versus 2.1 CI (Cubic inch) for the 1TB T1 SSD.

It’s not a small increase (+31% in volume), but the overall positioning and usage model for the T3 SSD remain similar to the T1: it is small and offers a much greater storage density:

Samsung SSD T3 2TB storage density: 744.7 GB/Cubic-Inch
Samsung SSD T3 1TB storage density: 448.4 GB/Cubic-Inch

"744.7 GB PER CUBIC-INCH"

This is the highest storage density for a consumer-level product, and the 2TB version of the SSD T3 is particularly impressive on that level.

Physical Protection

When you carry up to 2TB of data, you don’t want to see it destroyed, or have it fall in the wrong hands. If destroyed, you may have a backup somewhere, but the chances are that you’re not at your office location, and it may or may not be easy to download that kind of data quickly.

That’s why Samsung has made the outer shell much tougher than it did for the first iteration. The SSD feels much tougher, and I guess that the slightly more rectangular design has something to do with how it can withstand shocks. It feels many times more solid than its predecessor.

"THE T3 CAN SURVIVE NASTY DROPS AND SHOCKS" With a rating of 1500G (1500 times its weight), the device should support pressures of ~168lbs, which is probably sufficient to survive most falls. If we take the quick approximation that the 51g of mass have a surface area of 4292 square mm (58x74mm) with a drag coefficient of 2.1 (brick-sized object) falling in the air (medium density=1.5 kg/cube meter), the terminal velocity (maximum falling speed) is ~9 Meters/sec.

This speed is reached if the object falls from a height of around ~5m (~5 yards), which is more or less a two-story building. At that speed, the impact force for a 51g object is around 24 Newtons, which can be roughly converted to ~107 lbs. of force. Long story short: the T3 can survive nasty drops and shocks.

Moving to USB-C

For this iteration, Samsung has decided to switch to USB-C and it’s a good decision. First of all, the connector is much smaller (and reversible) on the drive. Secondly, this will make it compatible with cables commonly used for USB phones and more. Most of the industry will fully jump on the USB-C wagon next year, but Samsung has decided to do it early with this product.

Disk performance: leading-edge

ssd-t3-crystalmark

A lot of people are still using mechanical drives for their affordable price per GB. However, the invisible price to pay for these is of course, a huge performance gap. Secondly, all Flash memory storage is not equal. Let’s take a look at a spectrum of performance (T1: green, T3: orange):

ssd-t3-filecopy-speed

Interestingly, the Samsung SSD T-series can do better than this. We ran the same file copy on a new HP X360 15” laptop, and the copy speed was nearly 2X faster, which is pretty great. This is to say that plugging a drive and copy some file on your computer doesn’t reveal the whole performance picture, but it can give you a good (relative) starting point.

"THE SSD T3 HAS NO CLEAR CHALLENGER" And I don’t even have a USB 3.1+ UASP mode which supposedly has 2X the performance of USB 3.0 to reach 10Gbps (although the Samsung SSD T3 specs give it a 5Gbps speed even with USB 3.1 UASP). In reality, in no case can the SSD T3(or T1) go beyond 450 MB/s.

UASP means USB Attached SCSI Protocol. SCSI has been around for a very long time and was used for high-performance servers I/O. UASP requires support from your motherboard manufacturer.

As far as performance is concerned, the Samsung SSD T3 is extremely fast, and offers leading-edge speed. In its category, the SSD T3 has no clear challenger.

Software

01-ssd-t3-setup-passwordThe software has remained very similar to the previous version. It is very simple to get up and running a couple of minutes after following the step by step setup which consists of setting up your password. After that, you need to log in every time you reconnect the drive.

You don’t “have to” use the security feature. If you don’t want to activate the encryption, you can use the drive right away, no extra step required.

To make the drive compatible with both Windows and Mac OS, the Samsung SSD T3 comes preformatted with exFAT (Extended File Allocation Table), a file system that Microsoft created for Flash drives.

Security

If you do opt to use encryption, you simply run the little setup app which is on the drive, and it will ask to create a password. I’ve written a guide for creating strong passwords that are EASY to remember if you want some quick advice. There’s a 16-characters limit on the length of the password.

In practice, 16 characters can lead to a password entropy that makes it hard enough to crack (100s of years). However, having a longer limit could let users use passphrases that are extremely hard to guess, but very easy to remember such as “this is my 16 TH USB drive this year!” which yields a rather high entropy and is super-easy for the user to remember.

Strong AES encryption technology

The Samsung T3 SSD uses AES-256 encryption (Advanced Encryption Standard), which is a secure enough to be used by governments worldwide (including the U.S) to secure “Top Secret” classified documents. “256” refers to the key size (in bits) if the cryptographic key. The longer is it, and the longer it takes to break. A long password with AES-256 could take “centuries” to crack using current computer technology.

“256” refers to the key size/length (in bits) of the cryptographic key. The longer is it, and the longer it takes to break. A long password with AES-256 could take “centuries” to crack using current computer technology.

If you have sensitive data that you wouldn’t want a competitor or the general public to see, using the encryption is the best way to achieve that goal. Losing 2TB worth of professional or personal data could be a treasure trove for competitors, ID thieves, and hackers.

Android mobile access (new)

The Samsung SSD T1 can be connected to Android mobile devices via the USB port. There’s an app that you can download that which will use the password to decrypt the content. If encryption is disabled, the app is not required/needed.

Many flash drive in this segment (size/performance) aren’t compatible with Android devices.

Competitive landscape: limited

As a potential user, there is more than one way to look at drives such as the Samsung T3 SSD. Because of the product design, I’ll assume that you are not simply looking for the cheapest Flash option, but that you are in search of a secure, very fast or very small or very sturdy external drive – possibly a combination of all.

T3 SSD 256GB ~$129

in this segment the competition is interesting. You have mostly unencrypted products such as

T3 SSD 500GB ~$216

  • The MiniPro 500GB is much bigger, and its performance is unknown at this point. It’s also more expensive at around ~220
  • U32 Shadow 512GB is said to 420/420 MBs (can’t confirm) and sells for a similar price at ~$200
  • Shadow mini 500GB is a little cheaper at ~$190, and I suspect it has the same performance as the 256Gb version at 266/398 MBs
  • Samsung’s own SSD T1 (~199) has almost the same feature set and performance, minus the sturdier design.

T3 SSD 1TB ~$425

  • U32 Shadow 1TB (~360) starts to have a price difference that could be interesting IF performance holds true, and if durability isn’t as important to you.
  • Shadow mini 1TB (~379) isn’t such a good deal since performance is noticeably lesser and has no particular advantage

T3 SSD 2TB ~$849

  • U32 Shadow 2TB is one of the rare competitors in that size and capacity. At $740, the price difference is not insignificant if you’re willing to forgo the extra durability. The shadow mini is the only competitor with a 1500G shock rating.

Extra data points

To illustrate some of the differences in size (volume), storage density and storage relative to the weight, I made a few charts. First, let’s look at how big the drives are, in cubic inches:

ssd-t3-storage-volume-all

Right there, you can see that although the U32 Shadow 2TB seems interesting when browsing products, this shows that it is much bigger than the Samsung SSD T-Series. To be able to see more nuance, I’ll remove this model from the next chart.

ssd-t3-drive-volume

Despite being “mini”, the Shadow mini is still larger than both T-series drives. That said, it remains one of the closest competitors.

Looking at the number of Gigabytes per cubic inch will give us a further peek into how much data can be crammed into these drives. Again, both T-Series devices take the lead, with the 2TB capacity giving the T3 an advantage over its T1 cousin. The only 2TB competitor, the U32 Shadow, simply cannot compete by this metric.

ssd-t3-storage-gb-ci

Finally, looking at the amount of storage in relation to the drive’s weight, the Samsung drives take the lead once more, and compete and we end up with a Samsung vs. Samsung contest.

ssd-t3-storage-gb-g

Conclusion: the SSD T-Series remains undefeated

samsung-ssd-t3-editors-choiceThe Samsung SSD T3 is a superb product, and its full feature set is not often matched, if ever. Even if you restrict the comparison to performance and size (and forget about durability, design, and security), it is well positioned to compete aggressively in this market.

If you take all features into account (including real-time encryption and decryption), the Samsung SSD T3 Series rules in the ultra-compact high-performance market. In that context, Samsung’s SSD T1 is the closest T3 competitor. As data shows, non-Samsung popular competitors lose on all objective metrics – except price.

With the SSD T1, you would get a comparable compact size, security and performance as the T3, but you’re giving up only on potential speed with USB 3.1 UASP and on the sturdier design. Since the 256GB and 500GB T1s models are priced similarly (that’s true for non-Samsung SSDs too), the T3 is the obvious choice.

In the 1TB and 2TB segments, the price difference with non-Samsung products starts to be felt, so it’s up to you to decide if the T3 SSD unique features are worth the price difference. In many cases, they are.

Filed in . Read more about Samsung, Ssd and Storage.

Источник: https://www.ubergizmo.com/reviews/samsung-ssd-t3-review/

ג'ון יוסריאן

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Miss granny לי ג'ין-ווק. הזמנת מספר מכוניות בחו ל. לשכת מנכ ל מזרחי טפחות. מבחן במדעים כיתה ג אנרגיה חשמלית. נגב קרמיקה ראשל צ שעות פתיחה. חקר נתונים דיאגרמות כיתה ג. פעולת כניסה לכיתה ח. שפי ניסימוב ושות רו ח. ג'ון יוסריאן. שעות פעילות דואר הרצליה ב. גלי צה ל ערן סבאג חיים של אחרים. התמצאות בתנ ך מלא כיתה ד. ק.טנציק. חוברת פסח כיתה ג. Flight 666 ג'סי ג'יימס דאנג'לו. כבוד האדם רוח צה ל. תיקון פנצ'ר טבריה. מצגת חלבונים כיתה ט. תמ 'ג לנפש סינגפור. פן רפא וי ק 500 בהנקה. פתיתים אדומים ניקי ב. ניקי ב מרקים לחורף. רובוט צ'יקן אברהם בנרובי. יוסי בניון שכר צ& 39. Filetype pdf בדלתיים סגורות ז'אן פול סארטר. Tazza one-eyed jacks צ'וי יו-הווא. המטריד החדש של תושבי ראשל צ חזיר בר. הפקדת צ'ק אונליין לאומי. רשת ביטחון ח פ. ג'ון הרינגטון aja. א.א.ג אבנר ברקוביץ. השתלמויות פסגה ראשל צ. מילים באות ס. תכנית אנ מ ראשון לציון. הפועל חפ נ. אורי מלכה ז ל. אורנג חבילת גלישה חו ל. 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    Источник: http://0411202123.zasaditakava.cz/649374.html

    Crucial M4 64GB: Solid-State on a Budget

    Through a quirk of SSD technology, the Crucial M4 64GB has limited write speeds compared to the larger M4 models. The question is whether it’s still a worthwhile upgrade for users with limited storage needs and/or budget restrictions.

    September 13, 2012 byLawrence Lee

    Product

    Crucial M4 64GB
    CT064M4SSD2

    2.5″ SSD

    Manufacturer

    Crucial Technology

    Street Price

    US$70

    We’re currently in a sort of golden age for solid state drives with every well-known flash memory brand taking a crack at the market. With so many models available, selecting an SSD is arduous, but on the bright side, the intense competition has made them more affordable. The current crop of high performance consumer SSDs are faster, more reliable, and about half the price compared to those from a year ago. Despite the substantially lower pricing, they are still more expensive per byte than a standard magnetic hard drive by an order of magnitude.

    That said, many users don’t need a lot of capacity for everyday use, assuming personal media like music and video, etc. are stored in the cloud or on secondary/shared hard drives in desktops, enclosures, or NAS type devices. A fully updated Windows 7 install uses about 15GB, give or take, and the most common applications are megabytes in size rather than gigabytes, with some notable exceptions like Microsoft Office, Adobe Photoshop, and of course, high-end games. In many cases, a small, cheap SSD like the Crucial M4 64GB, can make for a very nice upgrade.

    Crucial first dipped their toe in the performance SSD market a couple of years ago with the acclaimed C300, one of the first SSDs to use the new SATA 6 Gbps interface. The M4 is the next iteration based mainly on the same architecture with a slightly updated Marvell 88SS9174 controller and smaller 25 nm NAND Flash chips rather than the 32 nm packages found in the C300.


    Crucial M4 64GB (CT064M4SSD2):
    Specifications
    (from the product data sheet)
    NANDMicron MLC
    ControllerIntegrated 8-channel single chip
    InterfaceSATA 6Gb/sec (compatible 3Gb/sec)
    Average Access Time< .1 ms
    Sequential Read (up to)415 MB/sec (SATA 6Gb/sec)
    Sequential Write (up to)95 MB/sec (SATA 6Gb/sec)
    Random 4k READ40,000 IOPS
    Random 4k WRITE20,000 IOPS
    2.5-inch SSD dimensions (L x W x H)100.5 x 69.85 x 9.50 mm
    2.5-inch SSD weight75g
    MTBF1.2 Million Hours
    Drive Endurance36TB=20GB per day for 5 years
    WarrantyLimited 3 Year Warranty

    Looking at the specifications you will see some disappointing numbers. The write performance is listed as only 95 GB/s maximum for sequential writes and 20,000 IOPS for random writes, fairly pitiful for a SATA 6 Gbps drive. Some small capacity SSDs have poor performance because manufacturers burden them with more affordable controllers and/or slower NAND chips but this doesn’t apply to the M4. The larger versions have more respectable write speeds yet use the same internal components. The issue boils down to the design of the controller and the type of NAND chips used across the entire M4 line.


    Crucial M4 Model Comparison: Performance Specifications

    Specification

    64GB

    128GB

    256GB

    512GB

    Sequential Read (up to)

    415 MB/sec

    415 MB/sec

    415 MB/sec

    415 MB/sec

    Sequential Write (up to)

    95 MB/sec

    175 MB/sec

    260 MB/sec

    260 MB/sec

    Random 4k Read

    40,000 IOPS

    40,000 IOPS

    40,000 IOPS

    40,000 IOPS

    Random 4k Write

    20,000 IOPS

    35,000 IOPS

    50,000 IOPS

    50,000 IOPS

    The M4 family uses 25 nm synchronous NAND modules with two 32Gb dies per chip for a combined size of 64Gb (8GB) per chip. So the 64GB model has 8 chips while the 128GB model sports 16. The Marvell controller has 8 channels that can be written to simultaneously and they’re all populated, one chip per channel in the 64GB version. Unfortunately this isn’t enough to to fully exploit each channel’s write potential — the 128GB model, with twice as many chips per channel, has specified write speeds about 80% higher, while the 256GB and 512MB versions are faster still. The question is how much does this effect the speed of the 64GB drive in real world use and whether it’s still a worthy upgrade over a magnetic hard drive.

    Crucial M4 64GB (CT064M4SSD2) box and contents.

    The drive.

    There are three versions of the Crucial M4 64GB that use the familiar 2.5 inch 9.5 nm thick form factor (Crucial also offers two slim 7 mm models) with the only difference being the accessories. Like many manufacturers, they offer a desktop kit with a 3.5 inch drive adapter, a laptop kit with a SATA to USB adapter for data transfer and imaging, and a less expensive barebones, almost OEM model which is what we have today. All that’s included is a small instruction sheet and the drive itself in an antistatic bag, immobilized by a thin plastic shell.

    TESTING

    Our samples were tested according to our standard hard drive testing methodology. As of mid-2008, we have been conducting most acoustics tests in our own 10~11 dBA anechoic chamber, which results in more accurate, lower SPL readings than before, especially with <20 dBA@1m SPL.

    Two forms of hard drive noise are measured:

    1. Airborne acoustics
    2. Vibration-induced noise.

    These two types of noise impact the subjective
    perception of hard drive noise differently depending on how and where the drive
    is mounted.

    Both forms of noise are evaluated objectively and
    subjectively. Airborne acoustics are measured in our anechoic chamber using a lab reference
    microphone and computer audio measurement system. Measurements are taken at a distance of one meter from the top
    of the drive using an A-weighted filter. Vibration noise is rated on a scale
    of 1-10 by comparing against our standard reference drives.

    As of late-2011, we have been conducting performance testing. A combination of timed real-world tests is used to represent a workload of common activities for a boot drive including loading games, running disk-intensive applications, copying files, and installing programs. Synthetic tests are also run to better judge the performance across the entire span of the drive.

    Summary of primary HDD testing tools:

    Key Components in LGA1155 Heatsink Test Platform:

    Performance Test Tools:

    Benchmark Details

    • Boot: Time elapsed between pressing the power button to the desktop and the Windows start sound playing (minus the average time to get to the “loading Windows” screen, 11 seconds on our test system)
    • COD5: Combined load time for “Breaking Point” and “Black Cats” levels.
    • Far Cry 2: Load time for one level.
    • ExactFile: Creating a MD5 check file of our entire test suite folder.
    • TrueCrypt: Creating a 10GB encrypted file container.
    • 3DMark Vantage: Install time, longest interval between prompts.
    • PowerDVD 10: Install time, longest interval between prompts.
    • Small File Copy: Copy time for a variety of small HTML, JPEG, MP3, ZIP, and EXE files.
    • Large File Copy: Copy time for 4 AVI files, 2 x 700MB and 2 x 1400MB
      in size.

    A final caveat: As with most reviews, our comments
    are relevant to the samples we tested. Your sample may not be identical. There
    are always some sample variances, and manufacturers also make changes without
    telling everyone.

    Ambient conditions at time of testing were 10.5 dBA and 22°C.

    Real World Performance

    A Windows 7 image loaded with our test suite was cloned to a 50GB partition
    at the beginning of each drive after a complete format. Our entire
    test suite was run start to finish three times with a defragmentation (SSDs and hybrid drives excluded) and reboot
    between runs.
    Average times were collected for comparison.

    In our loading tests, read speed is key and according to the specifications, the 64GB version of the M4 is just as fast in this regard as the larger models. There doesn’t appear to be any compromise in performance with the M4 64GB coming in second overall

    Our application tests showcased the disparity in read and write performance. In the ExactFile file integrity check test, it was as snappy as all our recently tested high performance SSDs. In the TrueCrypt test, where an encrypted file container is created (written to the drive), it was substantially slower.

    In our file copy test, the M4 64GB lagged behind the other SSDs tested by a noticeable margin. It was even defeated by the VelociRaptor 1TB, a high performance 10,000 RPM hard drive.

    The M4 produced a similar result in our installation tests, edged out all the models compared except the older VelociRaptor 600GB.

    To accurately represent the overall real world performance of the drives, we gave each model a proportional score in each benchmark series (loading, application, file copy, and installation) with each benchmark set equally weighted. The scale has been adjusted so that among the drives compared, a perfectly average model would score 100 points.

    With its handicapped write speeds, the Crucial M4 64GB finished slightly behind the Corsair Force 180GB, a first generation SandForce drive from almost two years ago, though it did manage to beat the fastest hard drives available, the VelociRaptors from WD.

    Synthetic Test Results

    Though our timed benchmark tests do a fair job of simulating performance in real world situations, it doesn’t tell the whole story. Synthetic tests like HD Tune and CrystalDiskMark help fill the gap. Note: on SSDs, a full format was conducted before running these tests.

    HD Tune’s main benchmark clearly illustrates the disproportionate read and write speeds. In sequential read performance, the M4 64GB came very close to the Kingston HyperX 240GB, the fastest SandForce drive we’ve tested. In sequential writes, its average speed was atrocious, well below 100 MB/s which is slower than current 7200 RPM hard drives. Access times were excellent though.

    CrystalDiskMark uncovered more of the same. Using a block size of 512K and a random data set, its sequential and random read speeds were excellent, challenging the top SSDs compared. Writes speeds were behind by 40% to 65% depending on the drive.

    Random read/writes with the smaller 4K block size gave us similar results as well. Good reads, poor writes.

    Energy Efficiency

    The energy efficiency of the Crucial M4 64GB was poor compared to other SSDs. Its power consumption was more typical of a 5400 RPM notebook hard drive. As a notebook upgrade, don’t expect any noticeable battery life improvement.

    Noise

    As solid state drives have no spinning platters or moving parts of any kind, they are effectively silent storage devices. It is possible that there could be a tiny bit of electronic noise (typically a high pitched squeal) being emitted, either intermittently depending on task, or continuously, but the Crucial M4 64GB was completely silent. In fact, the only SSD we’ve ever tested that made any audible noise was the Zalman S Series 128GB model which produced an odd high frequency squeal whenever it was accessed.

    FINAL THOUGHTS

    The Crucial M4 64GB is arranged with only one NAND chip connected to each of the eight channels provided by its Marvell controller, preventing each channel from reaching its full write potential. The obvious alternative to this strategy is to use only four channels with two NAND chips each but this would have decreased overall performance, not just writes. For SSDs, read speed is generally more important, particularly on small capacity models, so it’s hard to argue with their reasoning. Manufacturers want to use the latest, most densely-packed NAND chips for their high-end products and prefer uniform production lines using the same parts to keep costs down. Unfortunately this means that smaller SSD models sometimes end up getting the shaft.

    If we look purely at the reads tests, the M4 64GB is fairly competitive with modern SSDs like the best SandForce SF-2281 drives and the Samsung 830 Series. However, the limited write speeds has a substantial effect on all around performance, making it look like a last generation product ported onto a SATA 6 Gbps interface to keep up appearances. Despite this, it’s still a stronger overall performer than any hard drive on the market, even 10,000 RPM models like the WD VelociRaptor. If you’re looking for an SSD primarily for quicker loading times, that is the one area at which the M4 64GB excels.

    Unfortunately the pricing scale doesn’t favor low capacity SSDs either — the M4 64GB doesn’t provide much bang for the buck. Its US$70 street price is comparable to various 60GB SandForce drives but bigger SSDs are much cheaper per byte and faster as well. The larger 128GB version of the M4 for example, costs only $30 more and has much higher specified write speeds than that of the 64GB model. Unless your budget is severely restricted, it’s advisable to pay for the upgrade even if the extra capacity will largely go unused.

    Many thanks to Crucial Technology for the M4 64GB solid state drive.

    * * *

    SPCR Articles of Related Interest:

    Kingston HyperX 3K 240GB vs. Samsung 830 Series 128GB
    Corsair Force GS 240GB: SandForce with Toggle-Mode NAND
    Western Digital Red 3TB & 1TB Hard Drives
    ADATA XPG SX910 128GB Solid State Drive
    WD VelociRaptor 1TB and Scorpio Blue 500GB
    Hitachi Deskstar 7K3000 2TB Hard Drive

    * * *

    Discuss this article in the SPCR Forums

    Источник: https://silentpcreview.com/crucial-m4-64gb-solid-state-on-a-budget/

    INTRODUCTION

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    kingston a1000 480gb reviewa   When we first started testing NVMe M.2 Solid State Drives roughly two years ago we knew that this type would dominate the market in terms of read and write performance and as many of you are certainly aware we couldn't be more right (at least until something new comes along). Of course just like with SATA models not all NVMe M.2 SSDs are created equal and so there are many performance categories currently available for all pockets ranging from 1000MB/s and going all the way up to around 4000MB/s. Considering however that even 2.5" and SATA M.2 SSDs with read and write numbers at around 500-550MB/s are more than enough for the majority of the consumer base even entry-level NVMe M.2 models are in a whole different performance category/league. Kingston released their second consumer oriented NVMe M.2 SSD a few months back called the A1000 and today we'll be testing the 480GB capacity model.


           Kingston Technology Company, Inc. is the world’s largest independent manufacturer of memory products. Kingston designs, manufactures and distributes memory products for desktops, laptops, servers, printers, and Flash memory products for PDAs, mobile phones, digital cameras, and MP3 players. Through its global network of subsidiaries and affiliates, Kingston has manufacturing facilities in California, Taiwan, China and sales representatives in the United States, Europe, Russia, Turkey, Ukraine, Australia, India, Taiwan, China, and Latin America.


       For their entry-level A1000 NVMe M.2 PCIe Gen 3x2 SSD (M.2280 form factor currently available in 240/480/960GB capacities) SSD Kingston has paired the Phison PS5008-E8 quad-channel NAND flash controller with Toshiba's 64-layer 256Gb BiCS 3D TLC NAND flash memory and LPDDR3 RAM modules (either by Nanya or Micron). The PS5008-E8 NVMe v1.2 NAND flash controller supports several technologies including end-to-end data protection, SmartFlush (minimizes In-Flight data loss due to unexpected power loss), SmartECC (Strong ECC and RAID ECC), Smart Refresh, thermal-protection and self-encryption (supports AES, TCG-OPAL and TCG-Pyrite). In terms of performance Kingston states sequential read numbers of up to 1500MB/s for all models while write numbers vary according to capacity (800MB/s for the 240GB model, 900MB/s for the 480GB model and up to 1000MB/s for the 960GB model). As for durability/endurance Kingston reports 150TB for the 240GB model, 300TB for the 480GB model and 600TB for the 960GB model (all models are covered by a 5 year limited warranty).

     

     

    SPECIFICATIONS AND FEATURES

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    PACKAGING AND CONTENTS

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    kingston a1000 480gb review 1t

    The A1000 480GB NVMe M.2 SSD arrived inside a small clamshell box.

     

     

     

    Along with the A1000 NVMe M.2 SSD you'll also receive a getting started guide and an Acronis True Image HD Software Activation key.

     

     

    THE A1000 480GB

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The A1000 is a single side NVMe M.2 SSD model.

     

     

    Just like every other M.2 model to pass from our lab the A1000 follows the standard 2280 form factor.

     

     

    As usual a large sticker (not a copper one) placed at the top contains information like the drive capacity, serial and part numbers, barcodes, electrical requirements and several certification logos.

     

     

    Since this is a single side model no modules are placed on the opposite side.

     

     


    Removing the sticker reveals 4 Toshiba 3D TLC NAND flash modules (each 128GB in capacity), the Phison PS5008-E8 quad-channel controller and a 512MB LPDDR3 RAM module.

     

     

    SSD MANAGER

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    downloadt

    For more control over the drive you can download the SSD Manager software from the official Kingston support page.

     

     


    From the Kingston SSD Manager you can check the health of the drive, its current temperatures, various health options, available capacity and partitions, installed firmware version and check for new firmware versions.

     

     

    TEST BED

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    cpuz6700

     

    TESTING METHODOLOGY



       After almost 10 years of testing solid state drives we’ve concluded that it's almost impossible for any single benchmark suite to accurately measure their performance and that's why in certain benchmark suites we see amazing read/write performance numbers with some drives while in others things are quite different. The reason behind this is that some benchmarking suites are configured to read and write random chunks of data while others read and write constant (sequential) ones. So that's why i always use a very wide selection of benchmarking suites including AIDA64, HD Tach RW, HD Tune Pro, Crystal Disk Mark, Sisoftware Sandra Pro, AS SSD, IOmeter and ATTO. To get the most accurate results each test gets repeated a total of 6 times with the average performance numbers recorded into our charts. Also as of February 25th 2015 our results will also include the Storage Networking Industry Association’s (SNIA) IOMeter tests. These tests include a 12 Hour write test used to “simulate” performance degradation over time and a mixed workload test which basically shows what you can expect when using an SSD continuously for roughly two hours. Unfortunately due to the time required for these tests we repeat them a total of 3 times and not 6 as the above.


       Many people have made inquiries about our charts in the past so once again please do keep in mind that the Charts have the average performance numbers of each drive recorded and not the peak (highest) ones. Also although every single one of these programs can help potential buyers choose the right drive for their needs you should also remember that from any kind of benchmark up to real world usage the gap is not small (and usually most differences will go unnoticed by most people). All tests were performed in a fresh Windows 10 Pro x64 installation with every update installed up to November 11th 2018.

     

     

    TEST RESULTS - AIDA64 / ATTO

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    TEST RESULTS - HD TACH RW / HD TUNE PRO

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    TEST RESULTS - SISOFTWARE SANDRA PRO / CRYSTAL DISK MARK X64

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    TEST RESULTS – AS SSD / IOMETER

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    TEST RESULTS – IOMETER SNIA

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    CONCLUSION

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    kingston a1000 480gb reviewb

       Kingston lists the A1000 line of NVMe M.2 solid state drives as part of their entry level solutions and although they are still 2-3 times faster compared to regular SATA M.2 models in the NVMe market they are exactly that (for example their high-end KC1000 line – we should have a review up soon - is aimed towards professionals and demanding users). The performance of the Phison PS5008-E8 quad-channel NVMe NAND flash controller may not be stellar but it does offer performance levels of over 1600MB/s in read and 1000MB/s in write and several error correction features that boost its MTBF to 1 million hours with endurance numbers of up to 300TBW for the 480GB which we reviewed today. Unfortunately just like in every other M.2 drive we’ve reviewed to date thermal throttling was a very serious issue primarily during our SNIA testing suite so due to their very low cost we suggest grabbing an M.2 heatsink (EK Waterblocks, Alphacool and others make such solutions) to avoid ever encountering that issue.


       With a current price tag set at USD104.42 inside the USA (Amazon) and at 85Euros inside the EU (Amazon UK) the A1000 480GB NVMe M.2 SSD by Kingston costs roughly the same as your average SATA M.2 480GB drive. Granted it’s far from the fastest or most durable NVMe M.2 drive in the market today but if we’re being honest most consumers will never be able to tell it apart when compared with much faster models and that along with its very affordable price tag make the A1000 480GB NVMe M.2 SSD by Kingston well worth of our Golden Award.

    PROS


    - Good Overall Performance (1600MB/s Read & 1000MB/s Write)
    - Endurance Numbers (300TBW / 1 Million Hours MTBF)
    - Kingston SSD Manager Software
    - 5 Years Warranty
    - Price (For Some)


    CONS


    - Thermal Throttling

     

     

    Источник: https://www.nikktech.com/main/articles/pc-hardware/storage/solid-state-drives/9509-kingston-a1000-480gb-m-2-nvme-ssd-review

    3D NAND is something we started talking about two years ago when Samsung released their 850 Pro solid state drive which was the first consumer solid state drive to feature 3D NAND. With the launch of the MX300 Series Crucial becomes the second company to use 3D NAND in a consumer solid state drive. The drive is engineered with Micron 3D NAND technology, resulting in an endurance rating of up to 220TB total bytes written by leveraging larger NAND cells to deliver top-notch performance and prolong endurance. Furthermore, Dynamic Write Acceleration, a technology that uses an adaptable pool of high-speed and single-level cell flash memory, enables faster saves and file transfers. Compared to 16nm planar NAND, Micron’s 3D TLC NAND triples that density. This not only will help lower solid state drive pricing, but also enable higher capacity drives. Currently the MX300 is only available in a 750GB capacity, which has a price of only $199.99.

    Special thanks to Crucial for providing us with the MX300 750GB Solid State Drive to review.

    Specifications
    specs

    Packaging
    The MX300 comes in Crucial’s typical retail packaging for solid state drives. On the front there is a photo of the drive and it lets us know this is the 750GB limited edition version.

    Crucial MX300

    Flipping over to the back the package lets us know what all is inside and a resource URL for all of Crucial’s SSD resources.

    Crucial MX300

    Getting everything out of the box we have the MX300 750GB solid state drive, 7mm to 9.5mm spacer, and an Acronis True Image HD software activation key.

    Crucial MX300

    Pages:Page 1, Page 2, Page 3, Page 4, Page 5, Page 6, Page 7

    About Author

    Bob Buskirk

    About 10 years of computer experience. Been messing around with electronics since I was 5, got into computers when I was in highschool, been modding them ever since then. Very interested in how things work and their design.

    View all posts by Bob Buskirk
    Источник: https://thinkcomputers.org/crucial-mx300-750gb-solid-state-drive-review/

    If you’re in the market for a portable external SSD, both the Samsung T5 and the WD My Passport SSD are top choices (next to the rugged SanDisk Extreme) due to their proven reliability and solid performance (the drives are about two years old), but also because both devices are very easy to carry around. After the 3D TLC flash was released, it allowed the storage manufacturers to significantly shrink the memory cells, which meant that the new external drives would have a higher capacity while also keeping a very compact enclosure. The Samsung T3 caught the attention of the general public by taking advantage of the 48-layer vertical (3D) NAND and Western Digital decided to release the WD My Passport SSD as a response to the ever growing popularity of the Samsung T3 (at the beginning, My Passport used the inferior planar TLC tech, but it has updated its line with the 64-layer 3D TLC flash).

    wd-my-passport-vs-samsung-t5

    In the meantime, Samsung didn’t stay silent and it immediately released the T5 SSD (which also uses 64-layer TLC V-NAND) in an attempt to retain its top spot in the portable storage market. Two years later, the Samsung T5 and the WD My Passport are still very much popular and, since the flash storage memory got a lot cheaper, both devices are more accessible, so, if you need an external drive to easily carry around data while traveling or to simply increase the available flash memory of your laptop (especially MacBooks which don’t allow you to upgrade the SSD), I think it would be interesting to see which of the two portable SSDs are the better choice.

    ALSO CHECK OUT: SAMSUNG T5 SSD VS SANDISK EXTREME SSD

    Design
    The reason why I use external SSDs is because I can work on various projects directly on the drive and it’s easy to switch from one working station to another without having to transfer the data – of course, a NAS can help with this (and the TerraMaster F2-210 does a wonderful job), but it’s not going to work if I am constantly traveling, so the design and durability of an external SSD drive are two factors that should be taken very seriously.

    samsung-t5-ssd

    The Samsung T5 has kept the same case and the dimensions of its predecessor, the T3 (it measures 2.91 x 2.25 x 0.41 inches), both featuring a card-sized case with the uni-body metallic enclosure surrounding the internal hardware, leaving only the left and the right areas in hard plastic. Depending on the chosen storage, the T5 is going to be either blue (the entry-level models of 250 and 500GB) or black (the 1 and 2TB higher-end models), but, despite the chosen color, the finish remains matte, so you don’t have to worry about fingerprints or smudges.

    Similarly to the SanDisk Extreme SSD, the WD My Passport went for a slightly different design approach and instead of a metallic unibody, it chose a narrow plastic case which measures 3.5 x 1.8 x 0.39 inches, so while, it’s taller than the T5, it’s size will allow you to easily slide it inside a pocket (it’s also more lightweight, weighing 1.23 ounces, making it lighter than both the Samsung T5, which weighs 1.79 ounces and the SanDisk Extreme SSD). I did find the design approach of the SanDisk Extreme quite unique, but WD took it to another level with the My Passport SSD: the drive features a rectangular case (with sharp corners) which is divided into two equal parts, one is fully covered by a black matte finish (only with the WD logo carved inside the plastic) and the other has a ridge pattern covered by a silver finish which, unfortunately, is a smudge magnet. On a personal note, while I do appreciate the unique design of the WD My Passport, I do prefer the more premium feel of the Samsung T5.

    wd-my-passport

    Western Digital claims that the My Passport SSD will survive drops from up to 6.5 feet and, while I haven’t tested this claim, it’s in the nature of the SSD to be more rugged than the HDDs (the former lacks the spinning platter or any other moving parts), but if you’re looking for a truly rugged external drive, then the SanDisk Extreme is going to be the better option due to its rubber-coated unibody (while the plastic case of the My Passport can be cracked). At the same time, since I’m a long time user of the Samsung T5, I can attest that it will survive against drops despite not having any rating since I constantly drop it and it still functions perfectly fine (once again, the SSDs are simply tougher than the HDDs).

    wd-my-passport

    When I tested the SanDisk Extreme SSD, I noticed that, even when I wasn’t moving files, the case was constantly warm, especially towards the port and I have seen the same behavior on the WD My Passport which, immediately after I have connected to the computer, it got warm on the silver side of the case. The Samsung T5 is almost always cool to touch and it only got slightly warm when data was being transferred for a longer period of time. Both the WD My Passport and the Samsung T5 SSDs come with a USB 3.1 Generation 2 Type-C port (10Gbps), but only Samsung has added a small LED indicator to let you know the status of the device (solid blue shows that the SSD is connected to a computer, while a flashing blue LED shows that the data is being transferred).

    Note: Just like the SanDisk Extreme SSD, the WD My Passport has a single cable USB Type-C to Type-C and an additional Type-A adapter that can be attached to one end of the cable; Samsung has added two USB cables, one is Type-C to Type-A and the other is Type-C to Type-C.

    samsung-t5-ssd

    Verdict: Samsung has kept the same design for two generations and for good reason, since the T5 is solidly built and the heat management is one of the best I have seen on a portable SSD drive. Western Digital, on the other hand, seems to favor a narrower case which, similarly to the T5, will easily slip in your pocket. Furthermore, in terms of ruggedness, both drives will survive a few tumbles to the ground, but, since the Samsung T5 remained cooler than the MyPassport, it wins this round.

    Features and Performance
    The current WD My Passport SSD is equipped with an ASMedia ASM235CM B1TT7147A3, a Nanya 1733 NT5CC128M16IP-DIB DDR3L SDRAM and the WD Blue NAND 3D 64-layer flash (as a significant improvement over the initial planar TLC) which, despite seeming that it may be NVMe, is still using the SATA technology, so it is limited to 6Gb/s. Still, the WD My Passport advertises a maximum speed of 540MBps which is a bit lower than the 550MBps of the SanDisk Extreme SSD, but on par with what Samsung advertises for its T5 SSD.

    wd-my-passport

    That being said, the Samsung T5 is also equipped with the ASMedia ASM235CM Gen 2 SATA III bridge chip and it also uses a 64-Layer V-NAND flash, so, similarly to My Passport SSD, it uses the same technology to stack up 64 layers of 3-bit cells one on top of the other vertically, resulting in a higher density and allowing the portable compact design.
    In terms of security, the WD My Passport SSD claims that it uses hardware encryption (the AES-256-bit encryption) to protect your data which, apparently is always enabled; some users suggest that it uses a randomly generated (hard-coded?) encryption key and by setting up a password, you simply enable the controller to use the aforementioned key.

    Unfortunately, this means that in case the controller dies, the data is going to be unreachable, just like it would on a dedicated hardware encrypted external SSD – such as devices from iStorage (DiskAshur 2 HDD) or from SecureData (surprisingly, the SecureDrive BT does have some ways to recover the data even if you lost your password). Still, the difference between the security dedicated external SSDs and the My Passport drive is that you can get physical access to the internal hardware, so, technically, it is possible to access the data on the latter, while completely impossible on the former.

    samsung-t5-ssd

    The Samsung T5 also uses hardware encryption to protect your data and, similarly to the WD My Passport SSD, it locks your data using a password, but it seems that the T5 is among the drivers that are exploitable (as seen in this article). This means that even if the user uses the BiltLocker software encryption, since it trusts the drive, the entire system still remains vulnerable and the solutions seems to be to upgrade the firmware of the drive or to just use a third-party software encryption program.
    To test the performance of each drives, I first used the CrystalDiskMark 6 and the ATTO synthetic benchmarks (both drives have been formatted to NTFS and each has a capacity of 250GB).

    After running the CrystalDiskMark 6, I noticed that the read performance of the WD My Passport was almost identical to the SanDisk Extreme, so, when compared to the Samsung T5, there was no significant difference between the two drives. The ATTO Disk benchmark does seem to favor the Samsung T5 which overall shows a better performance, although not by much.

    wd-my-passport-vs-samsung-t5

    wd-my-passport-vs-samsung-t5

    Lastly, I decided to move a 30GB folder which contains five movie files (just like when I tested the SanDisk Extreme against the T5) and, using the Samsung T5 SSD, I measured an average of 340MBps while reading the folder and an average of 287 MBps while writing the same folder. Moving the same folder using the WD My Passport SSD showed an average of 355 MBps while reading the folder and an average of 214 MBps when I was writing the folder to the drive. I was pleasantly surprised by the reading performance, but the reading speed is unnaturally low and, since I saw a similar decrease when I tested the SanDisk Extreme SSD, I came to the conclusion that it may be some thermal throttling (?) since both device got really hot when running these tests consistently.

    wd-my-passport-vs-samsung-t5
    Verdict: From the internal hardware point of view, both the Samsung T5 and the WD My Passport SSD share a similar build and both use the 3D 64-layer NAND flash tech, but the difference between the drive (although not significant) can be seen when performing read/write tests, so, considering that the Samsung T5 did perform better, it wins this round as well.

    Software
    The WD My Passport has several software utilities that you can use, the first being the WD Backup which will allow you to backup files to either the My Passport SSD or to the Dropbox (you can create a Backup Schedule and choose which files will be saved on the drive or Cloud).

    wd-my-passport-vs-samsung-t5

    wd-my-passport-vs-samsung-t5

    Another utility is the WD Security where you can set up a password to protect the data from your drive – the utility allows you to Enable auto unlock for specific devices. Furthermore, if you want to upgrade the firmware of the drive, WD has made available the Universal Firmware Updater which is another small utility that quickly detects if the My Passport is up to date and, lastly, there’s the Western Digital SSD Dashboard which includes some of the previous utilities under a single larger software.

    Specifically, it will show some stats about the drive towards the top and, underneath, there’s a menu which includes the Status of the My Passport (shows the Capacity, the Volume, the Life Remaining, the Temperature and the Interface Speed), the Performance (it monitors the live performance of the drive and it can be optimized using TRIM), the Tools (here, you can update the Firmware, Erase the Drive’s content, run the S.M.A.R.T diagnostic tests, as well as view the Drive and System Details), the Settings (here, you can update the utility or adjust some other aspects of the drive) and Help (guides and reports).

    wd-my-passport-vs-samsung-t5

    Similarly to WD, Samsung has made available an utility (compatible with macOS and Windows OS) in order to allow the users to adjust various aspects of the drive, but unlike the My Passport, everything is kept within a single software. So, after installing the Portable SSD Software, you will immediately be asked if you want to add a password (write it down as you won’t be able to recover it using regular means) and afterwards, I could see the total amount of Used and Free GB, as well as a shortcut to the Settings area: press it to either enable or disable the Security Mode.

    samsung-t5-vs-sandisk-extreme-ssd

    samsung-t5-vs-sandisk-extreme
    Verdict: I really like the modern feel of the Samsung utility and the way it allows for a basic configuration of the drive, but, even if the security aspect of the My Passport is separate from the Dashboard, I did find the WD software bundle more comprehensive, so it wins this round.

    Conclusion
    When I tested the Samsung T5 and the SanDisk Extreme, I found it difficult to choose a favorite since both were excelling at a specific task (one was focused towards raw performance, while the other towards portability), but when put against the WD My Passport, I do prefer the Samsung T5 because of its slightly better speed performance, but mostly because of its exterior. I know that the WD My Passport is more lightweight and its shape may make it easier to carry around, but the drive is always either warm or hot and it lacks the portability advantage of SanDisk’s orange loop, so I do consider the Samsung T5 the better drive.
    Note: Both the WD My Passport and the Samsung T5 SSDs have a three-year limited warranty.

    Check the products here:

    Samsung T5 SSD:

    amazonbutton

    WD My Passport SSD:

    amazonbutton

    logo

    Mark B

    Mark is a graduate in Computer Science, having gathered valuable experience over the years working in IT as a programmer. Mark is also the main tech writer for MBReviews.com, covering not only his passion, the networking devices, but also other cool electronic gadgets that you may find useful for your every day life.

    Tags my passport, portable, samsung, samsung t5, ssd, storage, wd, western digitalИсточник: https://www.mbreviews.com/samsung-t5-vs-wd-my-passport/

    As ssd benchmark vs crystaldiskmark - Crack Key For U -

    Every day the war for data rages and much of it is out of the public eye. Lately hackers seem to attack at will and this high profile type of data theft is rampant. The most sensitive of government data isn't as vulnerable as data that proliferates in the private sector, but the data is still definitely at risk.

    Proteus Plus Military SSD

    Today we are delving into new territory, the land of Military/Ruggedized and Industrial SSDs. These can be among the most interesting of SSDs, simply because of some of the features added to make them survive some of the harshest environments in the world and protect sensitive data at all costs.

    Last year the Iranian government was able to capture a top-secret US drone never viewed by the public. The most discussed topic pertaining to the capture was the data that was contained on the drone itself. Encrypted data transmissions and the codes themselves, could allow the Iranian government to capture further top-secret data and drones and snoop on encrypted communications. On the other hand, they could even sell that data to more nefarious countries with the technology to exploit it further.

    This event had members of the government and the media questioning how this data is stored and protected. Do we just have drones flying about with top-secret information out there? The simple answer is yes; all governments have sensitive data stored in laptops, vehicles, drones and satellites. The trick is to protect this type of information from those that would seek to capture it.

    This is where the militarized and ruggedized SSD products come into the picture. SSDs by their very nature are best suited for the industrial and militarized space. They are more resilient than HDDs, which have moving parts that can be susceptible to failure by many factors in tough environments that simply do not budge an SSD. By tough environments, we are speaking of being launched into space under tremendous G-Forces, flying through the stratosphere in drones and taking enemy fire in tanks and other combat vehicles.

    The SSD is well suited to these types of applications, but the business of making ruggedized SSDs requires that there are steps taken to make these SSDs function under even more extreme circumstances.

    The TeleCommunication Systems base model comes ready for a rough life, but also has specialized options available and one that even allows for the SSD to work while totally submerged in water. Let's take a look inside at some of the features that make this SSD stand out from the crowd.

    Ruggedized Internals

    Lifting the drive for inspection it becomes clear by the heft that this isn't your garden variety SSD from Amazon. The SSD has a solid feel to it due to its precision-machined aluminum alloy case.

    The rear of the case at first appears unremarkable, but closer inspection reveals some non-standard screws rarely seen in consumer SSDs.

    These Torx screws were installed into the drive without normal thread locking to ease our ability to remove them and conduct the review. In actual deployments the screws will be thread locked, making them nearly impossible to remove with standard approaches.

    As we start to open up the SSD, we can see that the case has a channel milled between the two sides of the case. This channel allows for gel fills that can seal the case for waterproofing purposes if the customer desires that option. These types of seals provide for moisture proofing in very humid environments and dustproofing for dry sandy environments.

    Once we pop off the rear panel, we can observe the additional fasteners that hold the circuit board down securely. The eight additional fasteners hold this board down tightly. This makes the PCB extremely resistant to any type of vibration or G-Forces that would potentially cause the PCB to move out of place or crack.

    We also notice the odd-looking pins that protrude from the front of the case. These headers are for different methods of secure erasing, which we will cover shortly.

    Once we remove the PCB from the bottom of the case, we note that the PCB does not rest directly on the surface of the case. There is a gap between the PCB and the bottom of the case as well. This allows the entire case to be injected with silicone gel, which will encapsulate the PCB and all vital components. This protects it from any type of water or dust hazards.

    There is also the option of silicone, urethane or polymer conformal coating to round out the various forms of protecting the internals and the external case itself.

    The rear of the PCB holds eight packages of Micron 25nm SLC NAND. The NAND, 29F128G08AJAAA, reveals that this is asynchronous NAND. SLC is utilized because of not only its excellent wear characteristics, it can withstand 100,000 P/E cycles compared to 5,000 cycles from premium MLC, but also the performance in high heat conditions. SLC has much better data retention performance at higher temperatures, along with lower bit error rates and superb latency. For this capacity of drive, it could tolerate a rough estimate of 35 Petabytes in transfers.

    Finally, we get to the front of the PCB, which contains the Indilinx Barefoot controller. This controller, utilized for years now, is as stable as they come. Most commercial and enterprise SSDs released today are obsolete within a year. For the Militarized segment, the design and testing phase alone for these SSDs takes roughly a year. This approach guarantees 100% reliability.

    The choice to use a SSD controller with such low specifications might be surprising to many. The key here is the reliability.

    In the militarized and industrial segments performance takes a back seat to reliability. Lives can literally be on the line so it is crucial for the SSD to have reliable and predictable performance. Coupling this controller with SLC is going to provide for more than enough speed for its application in deployments.

    Blue BGA underfill surrounds both the Indillinx controller and the 64MB cache chip. This allows for a higher resistance to shock and temperature changes over the life of the device than solder alone can provide. This underfill adds additional rigidity to ensure the solder points do not fatigue significantly, limiting the risk of additional failure. For further protection, there is also the option for each component to have staking applied.

    Secure Erase Features

    Finally we come to the header that is located on the front of the Proteus Plus case. This is not standard fare on consumer SSDs, but is certainly a crucial component for the Proteus. The Indillinx Barefoot controller does not provide for hardware level encryption, though using software encryption will be common.

    This lack of hardware level encryption makes it critical that the fast destruction of the data contained on the SSD is possible. This is where the secure erase functionality, enabled via either software or hardware triggers, comes into play.

    This header is a General Purpose I/O header. This allows the SSD to be secure erased via a number of methods, including jumpers or hardware triggers. The hardware triggers can be either physical buttons or remote triggers that assure data destruction. Other possible uses could be triggers activated when panels are removed or when the SSD is removed from the location that it is installed within. There are a number of possibilities, but that is up to the end-user or agency. TCS simply provides them a port to connect the device of their choice.

    There are two holes to either side of the GPIO port. One is for a green LED power indication light and the other is for a blue LED to indicate that a secure erase is taking place. If the secure erase is interrupted by a loss of power, it will simply continue upon power restoration.

    The Proteus Plus SSD has eight different methods of data destruction. While this may seem over the top, several different governmental agencies have their own specifications for handling data destruction. This includes a bevy of military and governmental agency approved data destruction methods, which range from a fast erase (under eight seconds for our model) to secure erase + overwrite methods in a variety of flavors.

    Methods that confirm to US Army, Navy, Air Force, Department of Defense and the National Security Agency specifications round out the list of erasure methods:

    Fast Erase, DoD NISPOM 5220.22-M, DoD NISPOM 5220.22-M Sup 1, NSA/CSS 9-12, Army AR 380-19, Navy NAVSO P-5239-26, Air Force AFSSI-5020 and RCC-TG IRIG 106-7.

    Test System

    We will not be testing this SSD under our normal Enterprise Storage Bench. The reasoning behind this different approach to our testing regimen is that this Military/Industrial/Ruggedized SSD isn't utilized in typical enterprise scenarios by any means. These SSDs will not spend their lives doing anything as mundane as chugging away in a server rack nonstop.

    Instead, they will subject to wild extremes. Shot into space, placed into combat situations and conducting top-secret missions. The majority of applications that will utilize this SSD will not require the highest specifications or need to operate under enterprise steady state conditions for an extended time. The data loads placed upon this type of SSD are typically going to be light, such as data logging and telemetry data in aircraft and recording in satellites. These applications will require performance that will be closer in line with consumer testing than our Enterprise Storage Bench, so we will use several consumer benchmarks that are available to the public.

    As much as we would like to go skeet shooting with this SSD or even just go throw it in the pool, we aren't allowed to do any hardcore environmental testing. This falls to independent laboratories certified by governmental agencies to handle this type of testing.

    Since we have no other SSD of this type to compare to we will be simply presenting the test results by themselves. Perhaps as we receive more SSDs for the industrial or military space we can begin to do some apples-to-apples testing, which unfortunately will not involve shooting at them with rocket launchers.

    Specifications

    A brief synopsis of the finer points of the Proteus Plus, then off to testing. It is interesting to see that some of the MIL-STD-810 options include Explosive Atmosphere and Gunfire Vibration.

    ATTO

    ATTO is a test that operates outside of the file system installed on the host system. This allows the benchmark to test the performance of the drive without the limitations that some file systems can impose on the storage device. The typical file system does have some overhead and restrictions that can hamper readings of the sequential bandwidth in particular.

    This approach gives a clear view of the sequential performance of the drive under testing and used by the majority of manufacturers to generate the specifications that they market.

    The Proteus Plus easily meets its marketed specifications in the sequential testing with ATTO. The SSD performs well in the lower Queue Depths and then scales very nicely up to a maximum of 275MB/s in read speed and 263MB/s with the sequential write testing. These results are at the maximum that the SATA 2.6 interface can provide.

    Crystal Disk Mark

    Crystal Disk Mark measures a number of various types of file access patterns to the data storage device under testing. The benchmark uses both sequential and random data, along with varying Queue Depths for the random data, creating a compelling disk benchmark for users. There is also the ability to select between testing with compressible and incompressible data.

    The Indilinx Barefoot controller performs the same regardless of the compressibility of the data at hand, so we will be using the standard default benchmark mode with Crystal Disk Mark.

    The sequential read and write results are close to the results that we achieved with ATTO. The random 4K read at the Queue Depth of is 33.96, which is comparable with even current generation SSDs at that same Queue Depth. The write speed is considerably slower than today's models and the SSD does not scale well with the 4K write results at the higher QD. This is typical behavior expected from this generation of SSD.

    The typical applications for the Proteus will typically not consist of heavy random write workloads.

    AS SSD

    AS SSD is one of the few benchmarks that was actually designed with the SSD solely in mind. It tests with many of the same metrics that are included with Crystal Disk Mark with the notable inclusion of latency measurement. AS SSD tests latency with a 512B file size at a Queue Depth of one, while the industry specification is actually 4k QD1.

    AS SSD testing consists of incompressible data in the main benchmark. There is testing with varying levels of compression with one of the subtests. We will not be including that test as the Barefoot processor performs the same regardless of the compressibility of the data.

    The AS SSD results show the same relatively good low QD write performance and the lack of scaling with the 4K random write speed. This result is a hallmark of previous generations of SSDs. These relatively low scores are miles ahead of even the fastest HDDs on the market.

    Anvil Storage Utilities

    Anvil Storage Utilities is the other premier SSD-centric benchmark. Anvil measures the file system performance with a variety of file sizes and focuses on providing latency measurements for each type of data access. This is very important, as latency is the key advantage that SSDs have over their HDD competitors. Latency is the driving force behind that feeling of "˜snappiness' from the attached storage.

    Anvil also has other built-in utilities that test with more specific user defined parameters. Threaded read and write testing is possible with manual QD settings. There is also an endurance application and the ability to test with varying levels of compression. Anvil also does a great job of illustrating the type of system and drivers used in the testing of the storage right on the face of the benchmark screen. This can help when comparing results with different drivers and firmware revisions.

    Overall, the SSD performs within expected parameters for this paring of controller and NAND.

    HD Tune and Quick Bench

    HD Tune

    HD Tune tests over the entire surface of the drive or NAND in this case, by systematically writing or reading over every LBA on the attached storage. The initial design for HD Tune was for the testing of hard disk drives. As the drive progresses in the test, it would illustrate the loss of speed as the head moved from the outer portion of the platter to the inner regions.

    This approach can also be uniquely suited for SSDs, as it will highlight any inconsistent or erratic behavior in the SSD as it fills with data.

    The read only average latency remains remarkably consistent across the entire drive during testing, an expected result when using premium SLC NAND. There is very little variability between the minimum, maximum and average read speeds.

    The write speed is remarkably consistent, with a flat line of 250MB/s across the entire surface of the NAND. This isn't surprising with the implementation of SLC NAND.

    Quick Bench

    Quick Bench conducts a user configurable number of runs (termed Cycles) and then provides the average of those cycles as the result. This can blur out any peak values and show results that are indicative of continued usage. This is particularly relevant when assessing write performance. There is also the option to perform a variety of testing at various file sizes. The option to allow disk cache effects injects pauses between write commands to clear the write cache. Unchecking this box removes the testing of the write caching entirely.

    Providing results across numerous file sizes in both random and sequential access both graphically and numerically provides a great representation of the overall storage performance.

    The straight lines represent the average speed of the different variations and the curved lines represent the average of the five combined cycles. The random and sequential write speed is remarkably consistent, regardless of the size of file tested.

    The highlighted areas indicate both the highest and lowest marks for each test. Here we can note that the random read and write speed with larger file sizes is surprisingly good.

    Final Thoughts

    The mobile explosion has created a huge problem for the various government agencies tasked with creating, storing and protecting classified data. Reality can be scary. On March 15th of this year a nuclear scientist's laptop went missing on a train in India. The implication of missing sensitive nuclear data in this volatile region of the world is simply alarming. This loss isn't just a threat to the security of India, it could be a threat to the entire world.

    In June of this year, a top-secret laptop containing Taiwanese plans for a stealth ship went missing and presumably is in the hands of the Chinese government. Unfortunately, these aren't isolated events and well publicized security breaches with laptops have happened in the UK and the US as well. Loss of equipment such as the top secret US drone in Iran also brings the relevance of data security to light.

    Maybe what is the scariest are the losses of data that we aren't even aware of. Information that is so sensitive that even the loss will never be confirmed nor denied. Protecting data that can cost human lives brings a tremendous responsibility along with it. In these types of applications, reliability comes to the forefront and speed is a secondary consideration. That is the purpose of utilizing the Indilinx Barefoot controller with the Proteus Plus SSD. It is stable and a proven performer that has stood the test of time. Making this controller forward compatible with the newer generations of NAND is an important step to making this a relevant NAND/controller combination.
     
    The only notable feature that is lacking is power capacitors for data protection in the event of power loss. This may have been lost to price constraints as power capacitors typically add quite a bit of cost to the end product.

    Features that harden the SSD abound with the base design of this SSD providing a tremendous amount of protection from the majority of environmental hazards. The added ability to customize this SSD to withstand the most violent of forces adds an extra layer of protection. BGA underfill, staking of components, conformal coating and gel encapsulation will support just about any use.

    Perhaps most important are the steps taken to ensure that the data contained on the SSD is safe. While the device does not support encryption at the hardware level, the majority of secure applications will employ software encryption as a standard.

    What is important is the ability to destroy the data immediately. The plethora of secure erase methods provides a means to please even the most scrutinizing of government agencies. Triggering these different types of data destruction with either software or hardware is a neat feature that will allow for multiple methods of destruction with a single SSD. Anything from too many password attempts, remote triggers or physically moving the SSD could delete the data.

    It can be frightening to think of the power that a bunch of ones and zeros can have when they fall into the wrong hands, but the advent of technology and devices such as the Proteus Plus can help keep that data secure under the most demanding scenarios.

    Update from manufacturer: "The Proteus Plus does not feature tantalum capacitors, but instead uses a Power Management Circuit designed to protect the data resting in the volatile SDRAM cache at any moment. This is done by a power monitoring circuit in lieu of a passive RC circuit. The power monitoring circuit issues an early reset generated up to 200ms earlier as power is removed. The reset is used to both reset the controller IC as well as write protect the flash chips, leading to less chance of data corruption by an attempted write with unstable power. TCS System engineering has tested tens of thousands of power failures with this Power Management Circuitry and has not observed a loss of data with this technique."

    Источник: https://www.militarysystems-tech.com/articles/telecommunication-systems-proteus-plus-military-ssd-preview

    10 best hard drive benchmark tools for Windows 10

    Madalina has been a Windows fan ever since she got her hands on her first Windows XP computer. She is interested in all things technology, especially emerging technologies -- AI and DNA computing in... Read more

    • Disk benchmarking is the operation of running a utility or tool that accurately measures the rate of transfer or the transfer speed under various disk access scenarios (sequential, random 4K, deep queue depth, etc.).
    • Although there are many Disk benchmarking tools all over the internet, not all of them can do a great job providing you with accurate measurements. That's why we've gathered the best ones and included them in this list.
    • If you like keeping everything in order, here's a collection of handy Windows tools.
    • Explore our dedicated Hard Disk section to learn how you can fix various HDD/SSD issues.
    What are the Best hard drive benchmark tools for Windows 10

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    Computers today have some important components and without them, computers cannot operate. One of these components is Hard Disk Drive (HDD).

    This hardware holds immense importance because it holds the operating system for your computer to run. Speed of your computer depends on your HDD and if it’s slow, your computer will lag whether you have high performing CPU and memory.

    Multitasking also gets difficult due to lagging in computer hardware. This is the reason why high performing HDDs are popular and are highly demanded by many users. Upgrading HDD gives a new better life to your computer.

    With the launch of Windows 10, Microsoft has worked quite a bit to make the operating system use the system resources of a computer in the best possible way to provide the best user experience to the user.

    In this article I will tell you more about benchmarking HDD on Windows 10 with a list of programs that you can use to perform benchmarks.

    What is Hard Disk Benchmarking?

    Windows 10 continues to use NTFS as the default file system for the permanent storage devices installed on a PC running Windows 10.

    NTFS is known to provide a better way to index files and keep track of partitions. Microsoft has worked to make file accessing faster on Windows 10 but it also depends on the speed of the HDD.

    There are many factors that determine the speed of a HDD such as drive’s rotation or memory chips and settings such as the mainboard chipset, controller drivers, SATA/AHCI mode and RAID configuration.

    Speed of CPU and RAM also play a small part as well. But the problem lies when you cannot know if your HDD is even capable of working better than it currently is or does it need to be upgraded.

    For this purpose, software developers created some software to test HDD in your computer. The process is called Benchmarking.

    The need for Hard Disk Benchmarking

    Disk benchmarking is the operation of running a utility or tool that accurately measures the rate of transfer or the transfer speed under various disk access scenarios (sequential, random 4K, deep queue depth etc.).

    The purpose for this testing is to figure out in the terms of MBPS the speed, and summarise the speed characteristic of the disk.

    People involved in Graphic designing, 3D modelling, System admins and anyone who wants to maximize the performance of their PC finds disk benchmarking very useful for this purpose.

    There are many Disk benchmarking tools all over the internet. Downloading these tools gives you a strong way of finding the performance of your computer. Also, this kind of software can evaluate how much one adjustment impacts your computer.

    But there are so many benchmarking tools over the internet. Which to choose?

    For this purpose, we provide you a list of 10 best disk benchmarking tools that you can use to check your HDD on Windows 10.

    Benchmark data selection HD Tach

    This software is very old, from 2004, but it has shown good results since the date of its inception. It also works on the drives in today’s world after so much progress in technology.

    This software needs to be run in XP compatibility mode for Windows Vista or above operating systems in Windows. This tool allows long and short block tests to be run on the HDD and then shows the results through a pop-up window.

    It has a good processing speed due to which it takes only one to two minutes. HD Tach displays the result as a graph and a chart, specifying the read performance, burst speed and information for CPU utilization, average access time and average read speed. HD Tach can also be made portable.

    Keep in mind that in 2011 HD Tach had reached end-of-life and is no longer being supported.

    ⇒ Download HD Tach

    Best hdd benchmarking tools

    Crystal Disk Mark is prevalent nowadays as a tool for benchmarking because it has multipurpose and it has good rate of generating results.

    This tool works for about anything from USB drives to RAM, SSD drives to Mechanical hard drives. It is very easy to operate for the users who do not possess advanced knowledge. You can run more passes to find out relatively more accurate results.

    Crystal Mark Drive has an extra option for SSD drives which is considered to be very useful as it allows the user to select whether the to fill the data randomly or with 0’s or 1’s. This option affects the result on drives with hardware compression.

    Crystal Disk Mark also has portable and installer versions. Now it’s on version 6.0 and it’s still being supported and developed.

    ⇒ Download Crystal Disk Mark

    Best hdd disk benchmark tools ATTO

    ATTO is also one of the most famous portable tools which is being used by many hardware review websites. Some manufacturers also recommend this disk benchmark software to test the SSD drives for speed.

    All of the tests performed are sequential and are taken for read and write operations using block sizes of 512 bytes up to 8MB with a test file length between 64KB and 2GB, all selectable from drop down menus.

    Leaving Direct I/O enabled and the Overlapped I/O option selected will rule out odd results due to any system caching.

    Results obtained through this software can be saved and can again be loaded when required. You can get it for free from the link below or sent to you through email via the official site.

    ⇒ Download ATTO Disk Benchmark

    AS SSD Benchmark

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    This software is primarily developed to benchmark SSD drives and is very popular. It’s used by many hardware websites to compare different products on their sites and share the results.

    This software uses incompressible data due to which some of the SSDs show lower score results than if they compress their data.

    Sequential and 4KB read and write scores are displayed along with access times and a final general overall score. The overall view can be changed to IOPS according to the user’s preference.

    AS SSD is also completely portable.

    ⇒ Download AS SSD Benchmark

    Best hdd benchmarking tools hd tune pro

    This is the most widely known software for Disk Benchmarking. It also has a diagnostic utility. The free version has some issues and is old, but benchmarking works fine.

    As a result of the test performed, the graph will show the minimum, maximum and average read speed along with the average access time in milliseconds and the burst rate.

    The block size can be changed in the options from 512 bytes up to 8MB, and a slider can move between faster or slower and more accurate test speeds.

    The last version is HD Tune Pro 5.70 and it was released on August 4, 2017. The most important changes in this version are: erase – range can be specified, save options – current pass can be specified and added support for Windows 10.

    ⇒ Download HD Tune

    anvils storage utilities

    This utility is very comprehensive compared to the other tools and utilities. It runs all the tests and also displays all the results including response time, speed in MB/s and also IOPS.

    The developers didn’t launch the final build, but still, it is a very impressive work in progress.

    ⇒ Download Anvil’s Storage Utilities

    disk throughput tester

    It’s a small and portable software and it uses Windows core read and write functions to write a temporary file to the specified drive, then reads it back sequentially and randomly to get three resulting scores.

    The test file can be between 10MB and 100GB with a block size to test of 1KB up to 8MB.

    ⇒ Download Disk Thruput Tester

    roadkil

    It is a simple utility for beginners and it does the expected job. It creates small and useful utilities. But it only runs read tests and displays the score ranging from 512 bytes to 1MB blocks.

    ⇒ Download Roadkil’s Disk Speed

    HD speed

    It’s mostly like Roadkil’s tool, small and portable yet simple in nature, but HD Speed has more configuration options for different kinds of storage devices.

    It even has more modes than Roadkil’s: Read+write and Read+Write+Verify. This software however destroys any data that is being tested in writing mode.

    Block size can be left at Auto or changed from 1KB up to 16MB, a log file can also be created to review the results.

    ⇒ Download HD Speed

    DiskMark

    It is a tool that displays plenty of information after a test about average, maximum, minimum and last read and write scores.

    The scores are projected as a raw number form and as a graph, as well. Configuring this software for test is really a difficult task, mainly changing the set size.

    Disk Mark has 32bit and 64 bit versions available.

    ⇒ Download DiskMark

    As you can see, there are many benchmarking tools and more are being developed every day. We covered the most important ones and their features.

    If you are looking for a benchmarking utility for your Suface tablet, check the Disk Benchmark official app from the Microsoft store.

    Don’t forget to tell us in the comments section below what is your favorite hard drive benchmarketing tool and how often do you use it.

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    Frequently Asked Questions

      Источник: https://windowsreport.com/hard-drive-benchmark-software-windows-10/

      Kingston A1000 960GB PCIe NVMe SSD Review

      Kingston Brings First Value PCIe NVMe Drive To Market

      The A1000 Solid-State Drive (SSD) is Kingston’s first entry-level PCIe NVMe solution and it is available today in capacities of 240GB, 480GB and 960GB. As Kington’s starting point for PCIe NVMe drives, the A1000 series will sit underneath the KC1000 series that was introduced last year. This affordable drive series boasts speeds that are twice as fast as a traditional SSD using the SATA III interface and around 20x faster than the old school spinning 7200RPM hard drive. We are talking about sequential read/write performance of up to 1500 / 1000 MB/s and random 4K read/write performance of up to 120K / 100K IOPS. Not bad performance numbers from an entry-level PCIe NVMe drive series that uses a single-sided M.2 2280 form factor design. Kingston is targeting users that are trying to breath life into an old system or are building a new system on a budget and want to run the latest drive technology. Kingston is using the Phison E8 (PS5008-E8) controller with Toshiba 64-Layer BiCS3 3D TLC NAND Flash memory on the A1000 drive series.

      Kingston Consumer SSD Series For 2018

      Pricing on entry-level products is crucial as there is no shortage of low-cost SSDs on the market, so what does this ‘affordable’ PCIe NVMe series cost? The Kingston A1000 240GB drive is $119.60, the 480GB drive is $218.40 and the largest 960GB drive is $403.00. That prices the Kingston A1000 series just below the popular Samsung 960 EVO and Intel SSD 760p drive series.

      Kingston A1000 PCIe NVMe SSD Features and Specifications:

      • Form Factor: M.2 2280
      • Interface: NVMe PCIe Gen 3.0 x2 Lanes
      • Capacities: 240GB, 480GB, 960GB
      • Controller: Phison E8 (PS5008-E8)
      • NAND: Toshiba 64-Layer BiCS3 3D TLC
      • Sequential Read/Write:
        • 240GB: up to 1500/800MB/s
        • 480GB: up to 1500/900MB/s
        • 960GB: up to 1500/1000MB/s
      • Random 4K Read/Write:
        • 240GB: up to 100,000/80,000 IOPS
        • 480GB: up to 100,000/90,000 IOPS
        • 960GB: up to 120,000/100,000 IOPS
      • PCMARK Vantage HDD Suite Score: 150,000
      • Total Bytes Written (TBW):
        • 240GB: 150TB
        • 480GB: 300TB
        • 960GB: 600TB
      • Power Consumption: .0117W Idle / .0756W Avg / .458W (MAX) Read / 0.908W (MAX) write
      • Storage Temperature: -40C to 85C
      • Operating Temperature: 0C to 70C
      • MTBF: 1,000,000
      • Warranty/support: Limited 5-year warranty with free technical support.

      The drive that we will be testing for this review is the Kingston Technology A1000 PCIe NVMe 960GB model that is sold under part number SA1000M8/960G. The MSRP on this drive is $564.00, but street pricing has already shaved 28% off and that brings the price down to $403.00 or just under $0.42 per GB. The Kingston A1000 960GB NVMe drive has an endurance rating of 600 TBW when it comes to lifetime writes. That works out to meaning that you can write roughly 328.8 GB of data to the drive per day over the 5-year warranty period and be fully covered.

      Kingston A1000 NVMe SSD

      The A1000 series looks pretty much like any other M.2 2280 ‘gumstick’ drive. You have the common blue PCB with a sticker covering all the major components. Under the label there are four TLC NAND chips, one Micron DDR3L cache chip and the Phison E8 controller. The only thing included with the drive is an activation key for Acronis True Image HD software and a basic ‘getting started’ guide. Kingston A1000 NVMe Single-Sided SSD

      The back of the single-sided PCB is bare as one might expect.

      Let’s take a look at the test system we’ll be using and then jump into the performance numbers on a handful of popular benchmarking utilities that you can run at home to see how much faster this drive may be than what you currently have.

      Questions or comments? View this thread in our forums!
      Источник: https://www.legitreviews.com/kingston-a1000-960gb-pcie-nvme-ssd-review_204201

      Crucial M4 64GB: Solid-State on a Budget

      Through a quirk of SSD technology, the Crucial M4 64GB has limited write speeds compared to the larger M4 models. The question is whether it’s still a worthwhile upgrade for users with limited storage needs and/or budget restrictions.

      September 13, 2012 byLawrence Lee

      Product

      Crucial M4 64GB
      CT064M4SSD2

      2.5″ SSD

      Manufacturer

      Crucial Technology

      Street Price

      US$70

      We’re currently in a sort of golden age for solid state drives with every well-known flash memory brand taking a crack at the market. With so many models available, selecting an SSD is arduous, but on the bright side, the intense competition has made them more affordable. The current crop of high performance consumer SSDs are faster, more reliable, and about half the price compared to those from a year ago. Despite the substantially lower pricing, they are still more expensive per byte than a standard magnetic hard drive by an order of magnitude.

      That said, many users don’t need a lot of capacity for everyday use, assuming personal media like music and video, etc. are stored in the cloud or on secondary/shared hard drives in desktops, enclosures, or NAS type devices. A fully updated Windows 7 install uses about 15GB, give or take, and the most common applications are megabytes in size rather than gigabytes, with some notable exceptions like Microsoft Office, Adobe Photoshop, and of course, high-end games. In many cases, a small, cheap SSD like the Crucial M4 64GB, can make for a very nice upgrade.

      Crucial first dipped their toe in the performance SSD market a couple of years ago with the acclaimed C300, one of the first SSDs to use the new SATA 6 Gbps interface. The M4 is the next iteration based mainly on the same architecture with a slightly updated Marvell 88SS9174 controller and smaller 25 nm NAND Flash chips rather than the 32 nm packages found in the C300.


      Crucial M4 64GB (CT064M4SSD2):
      Specifications
      (from the product data sheet)
      NANDMicron MLC
      ControllerIntegrated 8-channel single chip
      InterfaceSATA 6Gb/sec (compatible 3Gb/sec)
      Average Access Time< .1 ms
      Sequential Read (up to)415 MB/sec (SATA 6Gb/sec)
      Sequential Write (up to)95 MB/sec (SATA 6Gb/sec)
      Random 4k READ40,000 IOPS
      Random 4k WRITE20,000 IOPS
      2.5-inch SSD dimensions (L x W x H)100.5 x 69.85 x 9.50 mm
      2.5-inch SSD weight75g
      MTBF1.2 Million Hours
      Drive Endurance36TB=20GB per day for 5 years
      WarrantyLimited 3 Year Warranty

      Looking at the specifications you will see some disappointing numbers. The write performance is listed as only 95 GB/s maximum for sequential writes and 20,000 IOPS for random writes, fairly pitiful for a SATA 6 Gbps drive. Some small capacity SSDs have poor performance because manufacturers burden them with more affordable controllers and/or slower NAND chips but this doesn’t apply to the M4. The larger versions have more respectable write speeds yet use the same internal components. The issue boils down to the design of the controller and the type of NAND chips used across the entire M4 line.


      Crucial M4 Model Comparison: Performance Specifications

      Specification

      64GB

      128GB

      256GB

      512GB

      Sequential Read (up to)

      415 MB/sec

      415 MB/sec

      415 MB/sec

      415 MB/sec

      Sequential Write (up to)

      95 MB/sec

      175 MB/sec

      260 MB/sec

      260 MB/sec

      Random 4k Read

      40,000 IOPS

      40,000 IOPS

      40,000 IOPS

      40,000 IOPS

      Random 4k Write

      20,000 IOPS

      35,000 IOPS

      50,000 IOPS

      50,000 IOPS

      The M4 family uses 25 nm synchronous NAND modules with two 32Gb dies per chip for a combined size of 64Gb (8GB) per chip. So the 64GB model has 8 chips while the 128GB model sports 16. The Marvell controller has 8 channels that can be written to simultaneously and they’re all populated, one chip per channel in the 64GB version. Unfortunately this isn’t enough to to fully exploit each channel’s write potential — the 128GB model, with twice as many chips per channel, has specified write speeds about 80% higher, while the 256GB and 512MB versions are faster still. The question is how much does this effect the speed of the 64GB drive in real world use and whether it’s still a worthy upgrade over a magnetic hard drive.

      Crucial M4 64GB (CT064M4SSD2) box and contents.

      The drive.

      There are three versions of the Crucial M4 64GB that use the familiar 2.5 inch 9.5 nm thick form factor (Crucial also offers two slim 7 mm models) with the only difference being the accessories. Like many manufacturers, they offer a desktop kit with a 3.5 inch drive adapter, a laptop kit with a SATA to USB adapter for data transfer and imaging, and a less expensive barebones, almost OEM model which is what we have today. All that’s included is a small instruction sheet and the drive itself in an antistatic bag, immobilized by a thin plastic shell.

      TESTING

      Our samples were tested according to our standard hard drive testing methodology. As of mid-2008, we have been conducting most acoustics tests in our own 10~11 dBA anechoic chamber, which results in more accurate, lower SPL readings than before, especially with <20 dBA@1m SPL.

      Two forms of hard drive noise are measured:

      1. Airborne acoustics
      2. Vibration-induced noise.

      These two types of noise impact the subjective
      perception of hard drive noise differently depending on how and where the drive
      is mounted.

      Both forms of noise are evaluated objectively and
      subjectively. Airborne acoustics are measured in our anechoic chamber using a lab reference
      microphone and computer audio measurement system. Measurements are taken at a distance of one meter from the top
      of the drive using an A-weighted filter. Vibration noise is rated on a scale
      of 1-10 by comparing against our standard reference drives.

      As of late-2011, we have been conducting performance testing. A combination of timed real-world tests is used to represent a workload of common activities for a boot drive including loading games, running disk-intensive applications, copying files, and installing programs. Synthetic tests are also run to better judge the performance across the entire span of the drive.

      Summary of primary HDD testing tools:

      Key Components in LGA1155 Heatsink Test Platform:

      Performance Test Tools:

      Benchmark Details

      • Boot: Time elapsed between pressing the power button to the desktop and the Windows start sound playing (minus the average time to get to the “loading Windows” screen, 11 seconds on our test system)
      • COD5: Combined load time for “Breaking Point” and “Black Cats” levels.
      • Far Cry 2: Load time for one level.
      • ExactFile: Creating a MD5 check file of our entire test suite folder.
      • TrueCrypt: Creating a 10GB encrypted file container.
      • 3DMark Vantage: Install time, longest interval between prompts.
      • PowerDVD 10: Install time, longest interval between prompts.
      • Small File Copy: Copy time for a variety of small HTML, JPEG, MP3, ZIP, and EXE files.
      • Large File Copy: Copy time for 4 AVI files, 2 x 700MB and 2 x 1400MB
        in size.

      A final caveat: As with most reviews, our comments
      are relevant to the samples we tested. Your sample may not be identical. There
      are always some sample variances, and manufacturers also make changes without
      telling everyone.

      Ambient conditions at time of testing were 10.5 dBA and 22°C.

      Real World Performance

      A Windows 7 image loaded with our test suite was cloned to a 50GB partition
      at the beginning of each drive after a complete format. Our entire
      test suite was run start to finish three times with a defragmentation (SSDs and hybrid drives excluded) and reboot
      between runs.
      Average times were collected for comparison.

      In our loading tests, read speed is key and according to the specifications, the 64GB version of the M4 is just as fast in this regard as the larger models. There doesn’t appear to be any compromise in performance with the M4 64GB coming in second overall

      Our application tests showcased the disparity in read and write performance. In the ExactFile file integrity check test, it was as snappy as all our recently tested high performance SSDs. In the TrueCrypt test, where an encrypted file container is created (written to the drive), it was substantially slower.

      In our file copy test, the M4 64GB lagged behind the other SSDs tested by a noticeable margin. It was even defeated by the VelociRaptor 1TB, a high performance 10,000 RPM hard drive.

      The M4 produced a similar result in our installation tests, edged out all the models compared except the older VelociRaptor 600GB.

      To accurately represent the overall real world performance of the drives, we gave each model a proportional score in each benchmark series (loading, application, file copy, and installation) with each benchmark set equally weighted. The scale has been adjusted so that among the drives compared, a perfectly average model would score 100 points.

      With its handicapped write speeds, the Crucial M4 64GB finished slightly behind the Corsair Force 180GB, a first generation SandForce drive from almost two years ago, though it did manage to beat the fastest hard drives available, the VelociRaptors from WD.

      Synthetic Test Results

      Though our timed benchmark tests do a fair job of simulating performance in real world situations, it doesn’t tell the whole story. Synthetic tests like HD Tune and CrystalDiskMark help fill the gap. Note: on SSDs, a full format was conducted before running these tests.

      HD Tune’s main benchmark clearly illustrates the disproportionate read and write speeds. In sequential read performance, the M4 64GB came very close to the Kingston HyperX 240GB, the fastest SandForce drive we’ve tested. In sequential writes, its average speed was atrocious, well below 100 MB/s which is slower than current 7200 RPM hard drives. Access times were excellent though.

      CrystalDiskMark uncovered more of the same. Using a block size of 512K and a random data set, its sequential and random read speeds were excellent, challenging the top SSDs compared. Writes speeds were behind by 40% to 65% depending on the drive.

      Random read/writes with the smaller 4K block size gave us similar results as well. Good reads, poor writes.

      Energy Efficiency

      The energy efficiency of the Crucial M4 64GB was poor compared to other SSDs. Its power consumption was more typical of a 5400 RPM notebook hard drive. As a notebook upgrade, don’t expect any noticeable battery life improvement.

      Noise

      As solid state drives have no spinning platters or moving parts of any kind, they are effectively silent storage devices. It is possible that there could be a tiny bit of electronic noise (typically a high pitched squeal) being emitted, either intermittently depending on task, or continuously, but the Crucial M4 64GB was completely silent. In fact, the only SSD we’ve ever tested that made any audible noise was the Zalman S Series 128GB model which produced an odd high frequency squeal whenever it was accessed.

      FINAL THOUGHTS

      The Crucial M4 64GB is arranged with only one NAND chip connected to each of the eight channels provided by its Marvell controller, preventing each channel from reaching its full write potential. The obvious alternative to this strategy is to use only four channels with two NAND chips each but this would have decreased overall performance, not just writes. For SSDs, read speed is generally more important, particularly on small capacity models, so it’s hard to argue with their reasoning. Manufacturers want to use the latest, most densely-packed NAND chips for their high-end products and prefer uniform production lines using the same parts to keep costs down. Unfortunately this means that smaller SSD models sometimes end up getting the shaft.

      If we look purely at the reads tests, the M4 64GB is fairly competitive with modern SSDs like the best SandForce SF-2281 drives and the Samsung 830 Series. However, the limited write speeds has a substantial effect on all around performance, making it look like a last generation product ported onto a SATA 6 Gbps interface to keep up appearances. Despite this, it’s still a stronger overall performer than any hard drive on the market, even 10,000 RPM models like the WD VelociRaptor. If you’re looking for an SSD primarily for quicker loading times, that is the one area at which the M4 64GB excels.

      Unfortunately the pricing scale doesn’t favor low capacity SSDs either — the M4 64GB doesn’t provide much bang for the buck. Its US$70 street price is comparable to various 60GB SandForce drives but bigger SSDs are much cheaper per byte and faster as well. The larger 128GB version of the M4 for example, costs only $30 more and has much higher specified write speeds than that of the 64GB model. Unless your budget is severely restricted, it’s advisable to pay for the upgrade even if the extra capacity will largely go unused.

      Many thanks to Crucial Technology for the M4 64GB solid state drive.

      * * *

      SPCR Articles of Related Interest:

      Kingston HyperX 3K 240GB vs. Samsung 830 Series 128GB
      Corsair Force GS 240GB: SandForce with Toggle-Mode NAND
      Western Digital Red 3TB & 1TB Hard Drives
      ADATA XPG SX910 128GB Solid State Drive
      WD VelociRaptor 1TB and Scorpio Blue 500GB
      Hitachi Deskstar 7K3000 2TB Hard Drive

      * * *

      Discuss this article in the SPCR Forums

      Источник: https://silentpcreview.com/crucial-m4-64gb-solid-state-on-a-budget/

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      Dell Precision 5510 - Upgraded HDD to SSD. Your opinion.

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      If you’re in the market for a portable external SSD, both the Samsung T5 and the WD My Passport SSD are top choices (next to the rugged SanDisk Extreme) due to their proven reliability and solid performance (the drives are about two years old), but also because both devices are very easy to carry around. After the 3D TLC flash was released, it allowed the storage manufacturers to significantly shrink the memory cells, which meant that the new external drives would have a higher capacity while also keeping a very compact enclosure. The Samsung T3 caught the attention of the general public by taking advantage of the 48-layer vertical (3D) NAND and Western Digital decided to release the WD My Passport SSD as a response to the ever growing popularity of the Samsung T3 (at the beginning, My Passport used the inferior planar TLC tech, but it has updated its line with the 64-layer 3D TLC flash).

      wd-my-passport-vs-samsung-t5

      In the meantime, Samsung didn’t stay silent and it immediately released the T5 SSD (which also uses 64-layer TLC V-NAND) in an attempt to retain its top spot in the portable storage market. Two years later, the Samsung T5 and the WD My Passport are still very much popular and, since the flash storage memory got a lot cheaper, both devices are more accessible, so, if you need an external drive to easily carry around data while traveling or to simply increase the available flash memory of your laptop (especially MacBooks which don’t allow you to upgrade the SSD), I think it would be interesting to see which of the two portable SSDs are the better choice.

      ALSO CHECK OUT: SAMSUNG T5 SSD VS SANDISK EXTREME SSD

      Design
      The reason why I use external SSDs is because I can work on various projects directly on the drive and it’s easy to switch from one working station to another without having to transfer the data – of course, a NAS can help with this (and the TerraMaster F2-210 does a wonderful job), but it’s not going to work if I am constantly traveling, so the design and durability of an external SSD drive are two factors that should be taken very seriously.

      samsung-t5-ssd

      The Samsung T5 has kept the same case and the dimensions of its predecessor, the T3 (it measures 2.91 x 2.25 x 0.41 inches), both featuring a card-sized case with the uni-body metallic enclosure surrounding the internal hardware, leaving only the left and the right areas in hard plastic. Depending on the chosen storage, the T5 is going to be either blue (the entry-level models of 250 and 500GB) or black (the 1 and 2TB higher-end models), but, despite the chosen color, the finish remains matte, so you don’t have to worry about fingerprints or smudges.

      Similarly to the SanDisk Extreme SSD, the WD My Passport went for a slightly different design approach and instead of a metallic unibody, it chose a narrow plastic case which measures 3.5 x 1.8 x 0.39 inches, so while, it’s taller than the T5, it’s size will allow you to easily slide it inside a pocket (it’s also more lightweight, weighing 1.23 ounces, making it lighter than both the Samsung T5, which weighs 1.79 ounces and the SanDisk Extreme SSD). I did find the design approach of the SanDisk Extreme quite unique, but WD took it to another level with the My Passport SSD: the drive features a rectangular case (with sharp corners) which is divided into two equal parts, one is fully covered by a black matte finish (only with the WD logo carved inside the plastic) and the other has a ridge pattern covered by a silver finish which, unfortunately, is a smudge magnet. On a personal note, while I do appreciate the unique design of the WD My Passport, I do prefer the more premium feel of the Samsung T5.

      wd-my-passport

      Western Digital claims that the My Passport SSD will survive drops from up to 6.5 feet and, while I haven’t tested this claim, it’s in the nature of the SSD to be more rugged than the HDDs (the former lacks the spinning platter or any other moving parts), but if you’re looking for a truly rugged external drive, then the SanDisk Extreme is going to be the better option due to its rubber-coated unibody (while the plastic case of the My Passport can be cracked). At the same time, since I’m a long time user of the Samsung T5, I can attest that it will survive against drops despite not having any rating since I constantly drop it and it still functions perfectly fine (once again, the SSDs are simply tougher than the HDDs).

      wd-my-passport

      When I tested the SanDisk Extreme SSD, I noticed that, even when I wasn’t moving files, the case was constantly warm, especially towards the port and I have seen the same behavior on the WD My Passport which, immediately after I have connected to the computer, it got warm on the silver side of the case. The Samsung T5 is almost always cool to touch and it only got slightly warm when data was being transferred for a longer period of time. Both the WD My Passport and the Samsung T5 SSDs come with a USB 3.1 Generation 2 Type-C port (10Gbps), but only Samsung has added a small LED indicator to let you know the status of the device (solid blue shows that the SSD is connected to a computer, while a flashing blue LED shows that the data is being transferred).

      Note: Just like the SanDisk Extreme SSD, the WD My Passport has a single cable USB Type-C to Type-C and an additional Type-A adapter that can be attached to one end of the cable; Samsung has added two USB cables, one is Type-C to Type-A and the other is Type-C to Type-C.

      samsung-t5-ssd

      Verdict: Samsung has kept the same design for two generations and for good reason, since the T5 is solidly built and the heat management is one of the best I have seen on a portable SSD drive. Western Digital, on the other hand, seems to favor a narrower case which, similarly to the T5, will easily slip in your pocket. Furthermore, in terms of ruggedness, both drives will survive a few tumbles to the ground, but, since the Samsung T5 remained cooler than the MyPassport, it wins this round.

      Features and Performance
      The current WD My Passport SSD is equipped with an ASMedia ASM235CM B1TT7147A3, a Nanya 1733 NT5CC128M16IP-DIB DDR3L SDRAM and the WD Blue NAND 3D 64-layer flash (as a significant improvement over the initial planar TLC) which, despite seeming that it may be NVMe, is still using the SATA technology, so it is limited to 6Gb/s. Still, the WD My Passport advertises a maximum speed of 540MBps which is a bit lower than the 550MBps of the SanDisk Extreme SSD, but on par with what Samsung advertises for its T5 SSD.

      wd-my-passport

      That being said, the Samsung T5 is also equipped with the ASMedia ASM235CM Gen 2 SATA III bridge chip and it also uses a 64-Layer V-NAND flash, so, similarly to My Passport SSD, it uses the same technology to stack up 64 layers of 3-bit cells one on top of the other vertically, resulting in a higher density and allowing the portable compact design.
      In terms of security, the WD My Passport SSD claims that it uses hardware encryption (the AES-256-bit encryption) to protect your data which, apparently is always enabled; some users suggest that it uses a randomly generated (hard-coded?) encryption key and by setting up a password, you simply enable the controller to use the aforementioned key.

      Unfortunately, this means that in case the controller dies, the data is going to be unreachable, just like it would on a dedicated hardware encrypted external SSD – such as devices from iStorage (DiskAshur 2 HDD) or from SecureData (surprisingly, the SecureDrive BT does have some ways to recover the data even if you lost your password). Still, the difference between the security dedicated external SSDs and the My Passport drive is that you can get physical access to the internal hardware, so, technically, it is possible to access the data on the latter, while completely impossible on the former.

      samsung-t5-ssd

      The Samsung T5 also uses hardware encryption to protect your data and, similarly to the WD My Passport SSD, it locks your data using a password, but it seems that the T5 is among the drivers that are exploitable (as seen in this article). This means that even if the user uses the BiltLocker software encryption, since it trusts the drive, the entire system still remains vulnerable and the solutions seems to be to upgrade the firmware of the drive or to just use a third-party software encryption program.
      To test the performance of each drives, I first used the CrystalDiskMark 6 and the ATTO synthetic benchmarks (both drives have been formatted to NTFS and each has a capacity of 250GB).

      After running the CrystalDiskMark 6, I noticed that the read performance of the WD My Passport was almost identical to the SanDisk Extreme, so, when compared to the Samsung T5, there was no significant difference between the two drives. The ATTO Disk benchmark does seem to favor the Samsung T5 which overall shows a better performance, although not by much.

      wd-my-passport-vs-samsung-t5

      wd-my-passport-vs-samsung-t5

      Lastly, I decided to move a 30GB folder which contains five movie files (just like when I tested the SanDisk Extreme against the T5) and, using the Samsung T5 SSD, I measured an average of 340MBps while reading the folder and an average of 287 MBps while writing the same folder. Moving the same folder using the WD My Passport SSD showed an average of 355 MBps while reading the folder and an average of 214 MBps when I was writing the folder to the drive. I was pleasantly surprised by the reading performance, but the reading speed is unnaturally low and, since I saw a similar decrease when I tested the SanDisk Extreme SSD, I came to the conclusion that it may be some thermal throttling (?) since both device got really hot when running these tests consistently.

      wd-my-passport-vs-samsung-t5
      Verdict: From the internal hardware point of view, both the Samsung T5 and the WD My Passport SSD share a similar build and both use the 3D 64-layer NAND flash tech, but the difference between the drive (although not significant) can be seen when performing read/write tests, so, considering that the Samsung T5 did perform better, it wins this round as well.

      Software
      The WD My Passport has several software utilities that you can use, the first being the WD Backup which will allow you to backup files to either the My Passport SSD or to the Dropbox (you can create a Backup Schedule and choose which files will be saved on the drive or Cloud).

      wd-my-passport-vs-samsung-t5

      wd-my-passport-vs-samsung-t5

      Another utility is the WD Security where you can set up a password to protect the data from your drive – the utility allows you to Enable auto unlock for specific devices. Furthermore, if you want to upgrade the firmware of the drive, WD has made available the Universal Firmware Updater which is another small utility that quickly detects if the My Passport is up to date and, lastly, there’s the Western Digital SSD Dashboard which includes some of the previous utilities under a single larger software.

      Specifically, it will show some stats about the drive towards the top and, underneath, there’s a menu which includes the Status of the My Passport (shows the Capacity, the Volume, the Life Remaining, the Temperature and the Interface Speed), the Performance (it monitors the live performance of the drive and it can be optimized using TRIM), the Tools (here, you can update the Firmware, Erase the Drive’s content, run the S.M.A.R.T diagnostic tests, as well as view the Drive and System Details), the Settings (here, you can update the utility or adjust some other aspects of the drive) and Help (guides and reports).

      wd-my-passport-vs-samsung-t5

      Similarly to WD, Samsung has made available an utility (compatible with macOS and Windows OS) in order to allow the users to adjust various aspects of the drive, but unlike the My Passport, everything is kept within a single software. So, after installing the Portable SSD Software, you will immediately be asked if you want to add a password (write it down as you won’t be able to recover it using regular means) and afterwards, I could see the total amount of Used and Free GB, as well as a shortcut to the Settings area: press it to either enable or disable the Security Mode.

      samsung-t5-vs-sandisk-extreme-ssd

      samsung-t5-vs-sandisk-extreme
      Verdict: I really like the modern feel of the Samsung utility and the way it allows for a basic configuration of the drive, but, even if the security aspect of the My Passport is separate from the Dashboard, I did find the WD software bundle more comprehensive, so it wins this round.

      Conclusion
      When I tested the Samsung T5 and the SanDisk Extreme, I found it difficult to choose a favorite since both were excelling at a specific task (one was focused towards raw performance, while the other towards portability), but when put against the WD My Passport, I do prefer the Samsung T5 because of its slightly better speed performance, but mostly because of its exterior. I know that the WD My Passport is more lightweight and its shape may make it easier to carry around, but the drive is always either warm or hot and it lacks the portability advantage of SanDisk’s orange loop, so I do consider the Samsung T5 the better drive.
      Note: Both the WD My Passport and the Samsung T5 SSDs have a three-year limited warranty.

      Check the products here:

      Samsung T5 SSD:

      amazonbutton

      WD My Passport SSD:

      amazonbutton

      logo

      Mark B

      Mark is a graduate in Computer Science, having gathered valuable experience over the years working in IT as a programmer. Mark is also the main tech writer for MBReviews.com, covering not only his passion, the networking devices, but also other cool electronic gadgets that you may find useful for your every day life.

      Tags my passport, portable, samsung, samsung t5, ssd, storage, wd, western digitalИсточник: https://www.mbreviews.com/samsung-t5-vs-wd-my-passport/

      watch the video

      How to Use CrystalDiskMark

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